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  #1  
Old 04-09-2010, 01:35 PM
Chickie Chickie is offline
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How does the locksmith know it's your house?

About a year ago, I was living with a boyfriend in a NYC apartment building- no doorman, maybe 10 apartments total, locked outer door on the street. He had gone away for a few days, so I was by myself- predictably enough, I left the keys on the table when I went to the bakery downstairs and locked myself out.

I managed to get into the building by following someone in, and then I camped out in the hallway outside the apartment door and called a locksmith. He came within a half-hour, I let him in the outside door, and we made pleasant small-talk while he quickly and efficiently drilled through the old lock, put a new lock on the door, gave me the new key, and relieved me of $80.

This got me thinking- he never asked for proof that I lived there- if he had, I could have pulled out some mail with my name on it, but only after I was inside. I wasn't on the lease. Couldn't I have easily been an ex-girlfriend who wanted into the apartment building while her guy is out on vacay? Do most locksmiths ask for proof of residency before they go drilling into people's locks, especially somewhere like NYC?

Can you just show up at whatever house you want, call a locksmith, and get in? Would a locksmith be legally liable for letting someone in who doesn't own the place?
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  #2  
Old 04-09-2010, 02:16 PM
Leaffan Leaffan is online now
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I don't have an answer for you, but this reminds me of the Police Squad TV series where Frank Drebin (Leslie Neilsen) is undercover as a locksmith and breaks into someone's house. So, the owner says "who are you and how did you get in here?"

Sergeant Frank Drebin, Detective Lieutenant Police Squad answers "I'm a locksmith. And I'm a locksmith."

Comedic genius that series was.
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  #3  
Old 04-09-2010, 02:17 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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He should have verified it with some form of ID, either before or after he opened the door for you. This is a major point of liability for locksmiths and locksmith shops. This is why most states require locksmiths to be licensed and bonded.

When I was working as a locksmith everyone in the shop was told on a daily basis, "Make sure you get some sort of verification of address when you do a lockout." We were taught to take a minute while getting our tools together or whatever and talk to the client, first by asking them outright for a picture ID, and if they didn't have one on them, ask questions like, "How did this happen?" "You're sure you don't have your keys on you?" stuff like that. That second question may sound like a strange thing to ask, but trust me, on at least a couple of jobs the person actually did have their keys in a back pocket, or sitting on their car seat or something. We were also taught that if a job seemed suspicious, to just walk away, which I also did more than a couple of times.

Anyway, if a locksmith breaks into a house/business/wherever and the person who hired them is a crook and proceeds to rob the place blind, the locksmith would be liable as an accomplice, so it should be in his/her best interest to check up on these things.

Last edited by DCnDC; 04-09-2010 at 02:20 PM..
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  #4  
Old 04-09-2010, 03:34 PM
Dynamo Dynamo is offline
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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
He should have verified it with some form of ID, either before or after he opened the door for you. This is a major point of liability for locksmiths and locksmith shops. This is why most states require locksmiths to be licensed and bonded.

When I was working as a locksmith everyone in the shop was told on a daily basis, "Make sure you get some sort of verification of address when you do a lockout." We were taught to take a minute while getting our tools together or whatever and talk to the client, first by asking them outright for a picture ID, and if they didn't have one on them, ask questions like, "How did this happen?" "You're sure you don't have your keys on you?" stuff like that. That second question may sound like a strange thing to ask, but trust me, on at least a couple of jobs the person actually did have their keys in a back pocket, or sitting on their car seat or something. We were also taught that if a job seemed suspicious, to just walk away, which I also did more than a couple of times.

Anyway, if a locksmith breaks into a house/business/wherever and the person who hired them is a crook and proceeds to rob the place blind, the locksmith would be liable as an accomplice, so it should be in his/her best interest to check up on these things.
Correct. We ask for either an ID that shows your name living at the address that needs to be unlocked OR a bill for that residence that matches a name on ID (in case you just moved, currently renting, etc.). DCnDC mentions that common sense goes a long way in these situations and if you have reason to suspect that something shady is going on then your best bet is to require ID before hand. Our dispatchers make sure to stress, no matter the situation, that ID is required before entering the premises. If they can't produce that, we tell them that we cannot be of assistance. There's no sense in risking your business over one call.

With that said, I have made exceptions in the past. On hand I helping a woman that was locked out in just her bath robe while taking out the trash one cold winter's morning. Her ID was inside and I was able to speak with a neighbor who confirmed her as the tennant. I made an exception to requiring ID beforehand because this obviously was a plausible situation. Once I got her in, she was able to produce evidence that she lived there. Granted, it was a risk, but given the circumstances it was a very, very small one.

Still, there are risks. Just because the ID matches the residence does not mean you're 100% clear. They could have just been evicted days or hours before hand. That hasn't happened to me or anyone that I work with but still, the possibility exists.

Same situation with cars. ID must match title or insurance card which are cross referenced to the VIN number. If they do not have ID on them, say it is locked in the car along with the keys, then we normally open the door, grab the ID and title/insurance card and check before we allow them access to the car. If something doesn't match, the door is locked and shut and the authorities are notified.

This is the second locksmith related question in as many days. I feel important!
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  #5  
Old 04-09-2010, 04:25 PM
Chickie Chickie is offline
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Ah, I got it. I guess this guy was simply not doing his due diligence. Then again, I also look pretty innocent *grins evilly*
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  #6  
Old 04-09-2010, 06:47 PM
Osip Osip is offline
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[QUOTE=Dynamo;12323373
This is the second locksmith related question in as many days. I feel important![/QUOTE]


Glad your around, I am the charter member locksmith, and I have been quite the slacker checking the boards and mostly lurking though. Nice to know Someone is picking up the slack and getting answers out in quick order!
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  #7  
Old 04-09-2010, 08:43 PM
Dynamo Dynamo is offline
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Glad your around, I am the charter member locksmith, and I have been quite the slacker checking the boards and mostly lurking though. Nice to know Someone is picking up the slack and getting answers out in quick order!
Wow, that's great to know I'm not alone here. Really great, diverse group on these forums. Sorry to derail but just wanted to issue some praise.
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  #8  
Old 04-09-2010, 09:55 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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I helped out a neighbor who had been locked out once -- let her in to use my phone to call the locksmith. (Years ago, before cell phones.)

The locksmith asked her for a picture id, and actually had a form on a clipboard where he copied down the information. He said his company required him to do this, and they filed the form. The form had lots of places for various types of other identifying info, like looking at mail, etc. And he wrote down my info on the form, as a neighbor who had identified her as living there. He had also already checked the building directory and found her name, and that was marked on the form, too.

I remember being rather impressed at how thorough this company was at verifying identity.
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  #9  
Old 04-10-2010, 12:36 AM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Remember the pilot of the Mary Tyler Moore Show? Rhoda was supposed to get Mary's flat but Phyllis beat her out of hit by signing a lease for Mary. Then Mary comes back home to find Rhoda has hired a locksmith to open the door to Mary's apartment.

Then Mary explains to the locksmith that it's not Rhoda's flat.

Locksmith) If that's true then I just helped you break into her apartment
[Rhoda shrugs]
Mary) Yes, you did
Locksmith) [to Rhoda] Let me see your driver's license
Rhoda) [laughs] I'm not showing you my driver's license
Locksmith) OK, but then I'm gonna memorize your face [stares intensely at Rhoda]
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  #10  
Old 04-10-2010, 08:32 AM
Ruken Ruken is offline
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Originally Posted by Chickie View Post
I managed to get into the building by following someone in, and then I camped out in the hallway outside the apartment door and called a locksmith. He came within a half-hour, I let him in the outside door, and we made pleasant small-talk while he quickly and efficiently drilled through the old lock, put a new lock on the door, gave me the new key, and relieved me of $80.
Did he even try to pick it, or was there no difference in price?
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  #11  
Old 04-10-2010, 08:52 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Originally Posted by Ruken View Post
Did he even try to pick it, or was there no difference in price?
There would have to be a difference in price, considering he replaced the lock, unless he was using hardware he had taken off of someone else's door(locksmiths often take away and keep locks they replace to be mined for parts or doing customers a favor by selling them a used lock at a discount instead of a brand-new one).

Picking the lock is something I would have tried first, but some guys don't like to do it or just aren't good at it. His time/labor cost was probably at least $50/hr, and attempting to pick a lock can be a huge waste of time, especially when you've got other jobs scheduled; you try to get in and out as quickly as possible both for your sake and the customer's. My shop always advocated "Only try to pick a lock for a maximum of 10 minutes. Longer than that, it looks like you're either wasting time or you don't know what you're doing." which is totally true, even if you're genuinely making an effort and completely know what you're doing. Some locks just don't pick, and nobody likes to look like incompetent.

Maybe the guy should have tried to pick it, but he didn't even check her ID. Sounds to me like he was in a hurry, like he had another job waiting or it was the end of the day or something.
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2010, 10:57 AM
Dynamo Dynamo is offline
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Could have been either a decent quality or high security lock and he knew better to even try picking it.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2010, 11:09 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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True. But even in those cases I liked to give them a quick rake just for the hell of it, unless it's a Medeco or Primus or something with more than just pins. Never know when they'll just pop open and save you the trouble of drilling and replacing.

Last edited by DCnDC; 04-10-2010 at 11:09 AM..
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  #14  
Old 04-10-2010, 06:52 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Picking the lock is something I would have tried first, but some guys don't like to do it or just aren't good at it. His time/labor cost was probably at least $50/hr, and attempting to pick a lock can be a huge waste of time, especially when you've got other jobs scheduled; you try to get in and out as quickly as possible both for your sake and the customer's.
What about trying out those automated electric lock picker tools? I thought that they were pretty effective on most locks. They are too noisy for a burglar to use, but that should not bother an authorized locksmith.
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  #15  
Old 04-10-2010, 07:05 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Originally Posted by t-bonham@scc.net View Post
What about trying out those automated electric lock picker tools? I thought that they were pretty effective on most locks. They are too noisy for a burglar to use, but that should not bother an authorized locksmith.
Many locksmiths frown on those, myself included. It does the same thing as a rake with the same success rate. Fact is, they're really no better at opening a lock than an experienced locksmith with manual picks.
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  #16  
Old 04-11-2010, 03:17 AM
Omi no Kami Omi no Kami is offline
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I lived in a hotel converted into apartments in a bad part of Oahu for a year, and I worried about the lock being jimmied/picked/broken on a pretty regular basis.

That is, until I locked myself out and had to call the locksmiths: they didn't ask for ID (although I spoke pidgin and my landlord called people who knew him, so they probably took his word for it). They assured me that I'd be inside in just a minute, and pulled out some manual picks. When those didn't work they tried an electric pick. When THAT didn't work they did a bunch of stuff I didn't recognize.

Two hours later, the door was still locked: either they were terrible locksmiths, or I lucked into having an incredibly resilient door (which is what I assumed). Since it was a hotel door the inside handle didn't lock, and they finally got me in by stringing a unfolded hanger under and up the door and grabbing the inside handle with it.
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  #17  
Old 04-11-2010, 07:17 AM
The Other Waldo Pepper The Other Waldo Pepper is online now
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Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
Locksmith) If that's true then I just helped you break into her apartment
[Rhoda shrugs]
Since the question's been answered, I don't mind continuing the hijack with quick mention of a Nero Wolfe story where a businessman (a) explains that he works out of the house and (b) readily consents to a tap on his own phone to learn whether his secretary is passing inside information. Our heroes naturally agree. The guy doesn't live there.
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  #18  
Old 04-11-2010, 10:19 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Originally Posted by Omi no Kami View Post
I lived in a hotel converted into apartments in a bad part of Oahu for a year, and I worried about the lock being jimmied/picked/broken on a pretty regular basis.

That is, until I locked myself out and had to call the locksmiths: they didn't ask for ID (although I spoke pidgin and my landlord called people who knew him, so they probably took his word for it). They assured me that I'd be inside in just a minute, and pulled out some manual picks. When those didn't work they tried an electric pick. When THAT didn't work they did a bunch of stuff I didn't recognize.

Two hours later, the door was still locked: either they were terrible locksmiths, or I lucked into having an incredibly resilient door (which is what I assumed). Since it was a hotel door the inside handle didn't lock, and they finally got me in by stringing a unfolded hanger under and up the door and grabbing the inside handle with it.
Your landlord didn't have a key?

Hotels generally don't skimp on the hardware, especially if it was a decent hotel. They could have drilled it but then they'd have to replace the lock at extra cost; maybe your landlord asked them not to do that. And that hanger thing? Probably the first thing I'd have tried. But shhh! It's one of those secret trade tricks that the general public usually wouldn't think of.
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  #19  
Old 04-11-2010, 12:06 PM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is offline
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Your landlord didn't have a key?

Hotels generally don't skimp on the hardware, especially if it was a decent hotel. They could have drilled it but then they'd have to replace the lock at extra cost; maybe your landlord asked them not to do that. And that hanger thing? Probably the first thing I'd have tried. But shhh! It's one of those secret trade tricks that the general public usually wouldn't think of.
I worked in a high rise building where a contractor could open a door faster that way then I could with a key.
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  #20  
Old 04-13-2010, 10:26 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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I worked in a high rise building where a contractor could open a door faster that way then I could with a key.
A friend of mine lived in a high-rise where apparently the thieves' favourite method was to put their foot on the frame beside the door, their butt on the other side of the doorframe, and push. The walls were metal 2x4 construction, so the whole frame bowed enough to allow a normal door latch to pop open.
After that break-in he put an extra-long deadbolt on the door.

Of coure, if the locksmith shows up from your call, opens your door, and goes away without talking to anyone else - who's going to know it was him unless they remember his van parked right outside the front door? (Even then, if it's a short stay, nobody may remember) If he had to park half a block away, they'd never know. Do the police canvass every locksmith after every break-in?
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  #21  
Old 04-13-2010, 02:34 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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A friend of mine lived in a high-rise where apparently the thieves' favourite method was to put their foot on the frame beside the door, their butt on the other side of the doorframe, and push. The walls were metal 2x4 construction, so the whole frame bowed enough to allow a normal door latch to pop open.
After that break-in he put an extra-long deadbolt on the door.
This is why good locksmiths try to sell you good locksets and double-locking deadbolts(needs a key on both sides). That Kwikset crap you buy at Home Depot is cheap for a reason. A small child could kick your door in with a Kwikset lockset on your door. People are really stupid about their home security until something happens. Got glass panels in your front door? You need a double-locking deadbolt. And don't leave the key in the lock on the inside. That door chain? Useless. Anyone with a coat hanger can pull that right off(no I'm not going to tell you how).
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  #22  
Old 04-13-2010, 03:09 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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How does the roofer know it is your house?

There was a house around here a few years ago that had its roof removed (the shingles). Homeowner returned home and called the cops. Turns out a roofing contractor had turned up at the wrong address and began work.

I cannot find the info for the local case, but it happens often enough that I found a number of references! In the local case, the roofer wanted the homeowner to pay a portion of the bill and the homeowner said no way.


Roofer removes roof from wrong house.
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  #23  
Old 04-13-2010, 03:13 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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...[A]sk questions like... "You're sure you don't have your keys on you?" stuff like that. That second question may sound like a strange thing to ask, but trust me, on at least a couple of jobs the person actually did have their keys in a back pocket, or sitting on their car seat or something....
My Aunt Jody, a dear lady but a little scatterbrained sometimes, called the police one hot summer day many years ago because she'd locked herself out of her car with her baby still inside. The cop looked at her, walked around to the other side of the car, and opened the unlocked door there.
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  #24  
Old 04-13-2010, 03:21 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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My Aunt Jody, a dear lady but a little scatterbrained sometimes, called the police one hot summer day many years ago because she'd locked herself out of her car with her baby still inside. The cop looked at her, walked around to the other side of the car, and opened the unlocked door there.
At least it wasn't a convertible.
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  #25  
Old 04-13-2010, 03:25 PM
Enola Straight Enola Straight is offline
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I've been following this thread...and to reply to the OP, I recently was directed to Self-Park to open a car whose owner accidentily lock the keys inside.

(I am trained and authorized to use specialized tools to open a locked car...I'm not going to explain how.)

Before I ever start I always ask "This car is registered to you, right"?

He says, "No, it's my sister's."


"Where's she?"

"Home."


"Sir, I can't break into a car that dosen't belong to you...I need security to come figure this out"

I call security for two reasons: one, to give some extra authority to my desicion because, after all, I'm the low man on the totem pole; and two, a guy who probably lost all his money at the casino and freaking out because he locked his keys in the car is liable to get violent if he dosen't get his way.

Security agrees with me...the car isn't registered to him, we can't break into it.

Last edited by Enola Straight; 04-13-2010 at 03:26 PM..
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  #26  
Old 09-08-2010, 06:44 PM
Best Buy Lock Best Buy Lock is offline
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As a locksmith I can tell you that I am not sure who you called but they should have ID'ed you before they let you in the place ... Thanks , Martin.

Last edited by samclem; 09-08-2010 at 06:53 PM.. Reason: removed link.
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  #27  
Old 09-09-2010, 04:33 AM
Dereknocue67 Dereknocue67 is offline
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I locked my keys in the car once and called a locksmith for help. He showed up, unlocked the car, asked for no ID, got paid and left.
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  #28  
Old 09-09-2010, 08:34 AM
muldoonthief muldoonthief is online now
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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
A friend of mine lived in a high-rise where apparently the thieves' favourite method was to put their foot on the frame beside the door, their butt on the other side of the doorframe, and push. The walls were metal 2x4 construction, so the whole frame bowed enough to allow a normal door latch to pop open.
After that break-in he put an extra-long deadbolt on the door.
This is why good locksmiths try to sell you good locksets and double-locking deadbolts(needs a key on both sides). That Kwikset crap you buy at Home Depot is cheap for a reason. A small child could kick your door in with a Kwikset lockset on your door. People are really stupid about their home security until something happens. Got glass panels in your front door? You need a double-locking deadbolt. And don't leave the key in the lock on the inside. That door chain? Useless. Anyone with a coat hanger can pull that right off(no I'm not going to tell you how).
Those double locking deadbolts are a code violation for residential buildings in lots of places, or at least every place I've lived. True, there's nothing stopping you from installing one yourself, but given that I've got young kids, I'll take the break-in risk over the dying-in-a-fire risk.
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:44 AM
Leaffan Leaffan is online now
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I locked my keys in the car once and called a locksmith for help. He showed up, unlocked the car, asked for no ID, got paid and left.
How does one ask for no ID?
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  #30  
Old 09-09-2010, 08:45 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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And don't leave the key in the lock on the inside.
Why not? I don't do it for security, I do it because it's the one place I will remember to grab them before going out, but I'm curious: what's wrong about having them there?
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  #31  
Old 09-09-2010, 08:52 AM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dereknocue67 View Post
I locked my keys in the car once and called a locksmith for help. He showed up, unlocked the car, asked for no ID, got paid and left.
How does one ask for no ID?
"Excuse me, do you have no ID?"
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  #32  
Old 09-09-2010, 09:17 AM
RandMcnally RandMcnally is offline
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Hijack question for the locksmiths: How do you become one? Is there a school?
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  #33  
Old 09-09-2010, 09:24 AM
EristicKallistic EristicKallistic is offline
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It was at that point that the Locksmith became enlightened.
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  #34  
Old 09-09-2010, 09:41 AM
Yarster Yarster is offline
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With AAA, they offer a discounted locksmith service for when you are locked out of your car. My boss locked his keys in his trunk one day, so we called the locksmith who asked for the AAA card, but no other ID. In other words, if I had found a random AAA card, I could have just used that to get a locksmith to unlock any random car, at least in this situation.
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  #35  
Old 09-09-2010, 10:30 AM
postcards postcards is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
And don't leave the key in the lock on the inside.
Why not? I don't do it for security, I do it because it's the one place I will remember to grab them before going out, but I'm curious: what's wrong about having them there?
Read the sentences before the one you quoted:

Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Got glass panels in your front door? You need a double-locking deadbolt. And don't leave the key in the lock on the inside.
Because a thief will be able to see the key through the glass panel before he breaks the glass panel to let himself in.
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Last edited by postcards; 09-09-2010 at 10:31 AM..
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  #36  
Old 09-09-2010, 12:06 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Hijack question for the locksmiths: How do you become one? Is there a school?
There are trade schools, places like Lincoln Tech or whatnot. Some shops, like the one I worked at, run their own training program; in fact my company didn't even hire people who had worked as locksmiths before, they only trained new ones.
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Old 09-09-2010, 12:31 PM
BobArrgh BobArrgh is offline
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Sorry if I have posted this before.

Back in the late 1980s, I was living in Pacoima, California. At the time, there was large gang presence in the area.

My wife and I drove an old car, and she had locked her keys in it a few times. The hood could be opened from the outside only, and so I had placed a bent coat hanger inside the engine compartment for those emergencies. I got pretty good at opening the door.

One day, I went to the store and locked my keys in the car. No problem, I thought. I grabbed the coat hanger and went to work. Fifteen minutes later, I was making no progress. I looked up and saw a gangbanger watching me with a bemused look on his face.

This guy looked like he was out of Central Casting for a "typical" Hispanic gang member: chino pants, patent leather shoes, white T-shirt, plaid outer shirt buttoned only at the top, hairnet, and teardrop next to his eye. As I am Caucasian in what was a predominantly Hispanic area, I was a little nervous.

He walked over to me and said, "You having problem?" I told him that I was, and handed him the coat hanger. He straightened it out and refashioned it, and then poised it next to the door.

Then he stopped and looked at me and said, "This your car?"

I laughed and told him it was, and that I would should him the registration when he got in.

He said, "Just checking," and had the car opened within 15 seconds. He handed me the coat hanger and walked away.

I still remember his politeness as he asked me if it was my car.
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  #38  
Old 09-09-2010, 12:42 PM
Bearflag70 Bearflag70 is offline
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Keep a spare car key in your wallet. It's saved me many times.

Last edited by Bearflag70; 09-09-2010 at 12:42 PM..
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  #39  
Old 09-09-2010, 01:16 PM
robardin robardin is offline
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Location: Flushing, NY
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Originally Posted by BobArrgh View Post
... a gangbanger ... walked over to me and said, "You having problem?" I told him that I was, and handed him the coat hanger. He straightened it out and refashioned it, and then poised it next to the door.

Then he stopped and looked at me and said, "This your car?"

I laughed and told him it was, and that I would should him the registration when he got in.

He said, "Just checking," and had the car opened within 15 seconds. He handed me the coat hanger and walked away.
That's professionalism, that is, 'cause if it wasn't your car, then he was gonna ask for some sort of cut . It's like when you inquire about custom jewelry settings and the first question they always ask is "are you in the business?".

ETA: That, or he suddenly thought he might be getting baited in some strange new sting operation.

Last edited by robardin; 09-09-2010 at 01:17 PM..
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  #40  
Old 09-09-2010, 01:32 PM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
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Location: ATX
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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
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Originally Posted by RandMcnally View Post
Hijack question for the locksmiths: How do you become one? Is there a school?
There are trade schools, places like Lincoln Tech or whatnot. Some shops, like the one I worked at, run their own training program; in fact my company didn't even hire people who had worked as locksmiths before, they only trained new ones.
I think I just figured out what I want to do after I retire.
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  #41  
Old 09-09-2010, 02:03 PM
zoid zoid is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
...[A]sk questions like... "You're sure you don't have your keys on you?" stuff like that. That second question may sound like a strange thing to ask, but trust me, on at least a couple of jobs the person actually did have their keys in a back pocket, or sitting on their car seat or something....
My Aunt Jody, a dear lady but a little scatterbrained sometimes, called the police one hot summer day many years ago because she'd locked herself out of her car with her baby still inside. The cop looked at her, walked around to the other side of the car, and opened the unlocked door there.
Another anecdote...

My wife called me one day years ago to tell me to get my butt over to the daycare center ASAP as she had locked the keys in the car with our 3 YO child inside. So I get to the daycare and I see a cop standing next to the car. Oh boy, I think, someone reported this and she's in trouble...turns out she called the cops when I didn't get there fast enough for her liking.

Then I notice he's laughing his ass off, and my wife is screaming hysterically at the rear window of the car - odd I thought.

Well it happened to be about a week before Halloween and while locked in the car our little angel had managed to open several large bags of candy. She was sitting in her car seat, about a pound of chocolate on her face, munching away as my wife loudly scolded her and the cop just wiped tears from his eyes.

Good times
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  #42  
Old 09-09-2010, 04:39 PM
CutterJohn CutterJohn is offline
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Whats a locksmith opinion on electric keypad deadbolts? I picked one up a couple years back, and I consider it one of the best purchases I ever made.


And my aunt locked her keys in her truck. I drove out, and using a simple coat hangar, got it open in about 15 seconds. She was all , and i was all .

Pre 97 F150s are stupidly easy to break into.
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  #43  
Old 09-09-2010, 05:22 PM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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Originally Posted by CutterJohn View Post
Whats a locksmith opinion on electric keypad deadbolts?
How do those work? Are they wired into the house electrical system, meaning you can't get in during a power outage? Or do they have their own batteries, meaning you can't get in if the battery dies?
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Old 09-09-2010, 05:47 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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Originally Posted by CutterJohn View Post
Whats a locksmith opinion on electric keypad deadbolts?
I assume you're talking about something like this.

They're decent. See a lot of them on rental properties. Just as simple to install as a normal mechanical one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary "Wombat" Robson View Post
How do those work? Are they wired into the house electrical system, meaning you can't get in during a power outage? Or do they have their own batteries, meaning you can't get in if the battery dies?
Most of them are battery powered, with indicators when the power is running low. As you can see in the pic, it does take a key for instances that the batteries totally die or if you forget the passcode. There are more complicated (and extremely expensive) systems that would be hard-wired into a building's security/surveillance system, but unless you have a large estate or are building a large apartment or office building, you'll never need to know about them.
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  #45  
Old 09-09-2010, 09:35 PM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is offline
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Originally Posted by RandMcnally View Post
Hijack question for the locksmiths: How do you become one? Is there a school?
My son is a locksmith.
He got his start by working as a utility engineer aat a college event center. He helped his boss with locks. Asked me questions. When he left he went to work at q hotel. Helped with some locks there. After he left the hotel he got a job with a large locksmith company. Started working in the shop. In a short time he was the shop forman. From there he started to work out of a truck with one of the old guys, and in a short period of time was working by himself. When he moved to the Denver area he got a job with a locksmith co there.


I am bragging but what the heck. I been working with machinery since 1968 and have never met a more natural wrench turner then my son. Got unkles and a Grandfather that are close so I guess it is in the blood. Normally it takes several years to learn the trade, you will never know it all though.
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  #46  
Old 09-09-2010, 10:04 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
I don't have an answer for you, but this reminds me of the Police Squad TV series where Frank Drebin (Leslie Neilsen) is undercover as a locksmith and breaks into someone's house. So, the owner says "who are you and how did you get in here?"

Sergeant Frank Drebin, Detective Lieutenant Police Squad answers "I'm a locksmith. And I'm a locksmith."

Comedic genius that series was.
From the files of YouTube!



Quote:
Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
Then Mary explains to the locksmith that it's not Rhoda's flat...

OK, but then I'm gonna memorize your face [stares intensely at Rhoda]
MTM!

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