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Old 04-14-2010, 11:12 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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Did Jesse Jackson Ever Apologize For This?

Years ago, I heard a snippet of a statement by the Rev. Jackson.
It was something like "I was worried when I heard footsteps behind me, but I relaxed when it was a white person"..or words to that effect.
Given the inherent racism of such a statement (i.e. that a black person following him was likely to do him harm), I would be surprised if Jackson did not offer an apology (or clarification) of what he said.
Did he ever offere an apology for his statement?
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  #2  
Old 04-14-2010, 11:27 AM
Frylock Frylock is offline
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Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
Years ago, I heard a snippet of a statement by the Rev. Jackson.
It was something like "I was worried when I heard footsteps behind me, but I relaxed when it was a white person"..or words to that effect.
Given the inherent racism of such a statement (i.e. that a black person following him was likely to do him harm), I would be surprised if Jackson did not offer an apology (or clarification) of what he said.
Did he ever offere an apology for his statement?
Not having seen the context of the quote, but knowing who Jackson is and what positions he typically argues for, isn't it overwhelmingly likely that the sentence you quoted is confessional? In other words, he's not saying he should have relaxed on seeing the person was white. The force of his statement, I would think, comes from the assumption that he shouldn't have relaxed just because he saw the person was white.

There's nothing to apologize for, if I'm reading the statement right.
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:28 AM
Smeghead Smeghead is offline
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I believe, though I could be wrong, that the point of his statement was that even he, himself, had been so steeped in the racism of society that he found himself with these deep-seated racist attitudes. The racism of his statement was exactly the point he was trying to make, so I don't know why he would apologize for it.
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:33 AM
raindog raindog is offline
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I believe, though I could be wrong, that the point of his statement was that even he, himself, had been so steeped in the racism of society that he found himself with these deep-seated racist attitudes. The racism of his statement was exactly the point he was trying to make, so I don't know why he would apologize for it.
Because he was dead wrong, maybe?
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:35 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Actually he was talking about the harm that black street crime does to black society in general. What he said was: "There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery, then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved."
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:37 AM
mbetter mbetter is offline
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Because he was dead wrong, maybe?
So you're saying he wasn't relieved to see a white person?
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:43 AM
The Great Philosopher The Great Philosopher is offline
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He said: "There is nothing more painful to me ... than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery, then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved."


I can't find the original speech unfortunately, so I can't give the actual context. Can anyone else? Personally I interpreted that not as meaning that even Jesse Jackson himself harbors racist sentiments, but that there are some areas of the country where statistically it is more likely that a black man might rob you than a white man, and that this reflects some sort of institutional problem in society (perhaps that inequalities of wealth and opportunity mean that those living in urban poverty, and those driven to crime as a result, are disproportionately black, for instance). But that's just a guess.
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Old 04-14-2010, 01:39 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher View Post
I can't find the original speech unfortunately, so I can't give the actual context. Can anyone else? Personally I interpreted that not as meaning that even Jesse Jackson himself harbors racist sentiments, but that there are some areas of the country where statistically it is more likely that a black man might rob you than a white man, and that this reflects some sort of institutional problem in society (perhaps that inequalities of wealth and opportunity mean that those living in urban poverty, and those driven to crime as a result, are disproportionately black, for instance). But that's just a guess.
I think you're overcomplicating this.

According to Wikiquote, he made those statements to a meeting of Operation PUSH in Chicago in 1993. They add that he found the feeling "humiliating." The original source (which Wikiquote may not be aware of) may be this Mike Royko column.* If that's the original source, I don't think we're going to find the whole speech. But Rokyo says Jackson was talking about crime in the black community, and I think that makes more sense.

*There's a discrepancy on the dates here: Wikiquote says he made those comments on December 4, 1993, but the Royko column is from December 1. He says Jackson spoke "last Saturday," which might be November 28.

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Because he was dead wrong, maybe?
He was talking about his own feelings, so I don't see how he could be wrong.
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Old 04-14-2010, 01:43 PM
Si Amigo Si Amigo is offline
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So you're saying he wasn't relieved to see a white person?
Knowing how many whites feel about the Rev. Jackson he really shouldn't be relived to see a white person coming up behind him.
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  #10  
Old 04-14-2010, 02:54 PM
Lightnin' Lightnin' is online now
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I find myself wondering if ralph124c sits around trying to find something vaguely related to liberals in order to get his outrage on.
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  #11  
Old 04-14-2010, 03:36 PM
Tapioca Dextrin Tapioca Dextrin is offline
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Given the enlightened responses so far, can we say that the answer to the OP's question is NO and leave it at that?
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Old 04-14-2010, 04:00 PM
Hal Briston Hal Briston is offline
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Given the enlightened responses so far, can we say that the answer to the OP's question is NO and leave it at that?
I got as far as the thread title when I guessed the answer would be "no".
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  #13  
Old 04-14-2010, 04:43 PM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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Originally Posted by Lightnin' View Post
I find myself wondering if ralph124c sits around trying to find something vaguely related to liberals in order to get his outrage on.
Outrage? I asked a question. I did not reference any "outrage" as you imagine.
Mods: please clarify-did I express any outrage?
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Old 04-14-2010, 04:47 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
Mods: please clarify-did I express any outrage?
You said the statement was inherently racist, so it sounded like you were expressing some disapproval. That said, it's probably better to keep this discussion on the topic of what Jackson said and whether or not he apologized for it rather than speculating about people's motives.
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Old 04-14-2010, 04:47 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Ralph is shocked -shocked! - at the idea that he was outraged.


Anyway, I don't see why Jackson need apologize.
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Old 04-14-2010, 05:02 PM
raindog raindog is offline
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..

Last edited by raindog; 04-14-2010 at 05:05 PM.. Reason: rescinded as post was a hijack
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  #17  
Old 04-14-2010, 05:22 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Jackson was talking about how black criminals were hurting black people, both directly by victimizing them and indirectly by perpetuating the stereotype of black people being criminals.

How is that an accusation of racism and what is there in this idea that needs an apology?

Last edited by Little Nemo; 04-14-2010 at 05:22 PM..
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  #18  
Old 04-14-2010, 07:23 PM
BigT BigT is offline
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Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
Jackson was talking about how black criminals were hurting black people, both directly by victimizing them and indirectly by perpetuating the stereotype of black people being criminals.

How is that an accusation of racism and what is there in this idea that needs an apology?
I think it's more like he should have expressed remorse for not rising above the culture and thinking that way himself. At one point in time, he apparently believed the stereotype.

However, in context, it appears he was expressing said remorse, as he was advocating how to fix the problem.

Last edited by BigT; 04-14-2010 at 07:25 PM..
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Old 04-14-2010, 07:36 PM
Diogenes the Cynic Diogenes the Cynic is offline
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Basically, he said he sometimes experienced a particular feeling that made him feel ashamed. I don't see how that's anything he has to apologize for admitting. He was expressing it as a feeling that he didn't like, not as a defense of the feeling. What is he supposed to apologize for, exactly, and to who?

Last edited by Diogenes the Cynic; 04-14-2010 at 07:38 PM..
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Old 04-14-2010, 08:04 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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Looked at another way, you could say that the original statement was itself the apology.
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Old 04-14-2010, 09:45 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Looked at another way, you could say that the original statement was itself the apology.
How so? Why would Jackson be apologizing from street crime? I'm pretty sure he's never mugged anyone.
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Old 04-14-2010, 09:53 PM
Diogenes the Cynic Diogenes the Cynic is offline
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Not for street crime, he was admitting to sometimes feeling fear of young black men and expressing shame about it (i.e. "apologizing" for it).

He was confessing to a weakness, even to hypocrisy. He was not defending the feeling. Essentially, the OP is asking whether he apologized for confessing human imperfection.
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Old 04-14-2010, 10:50 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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He didn't express shame; he expressed pain - that's a big difference. Shame would imply he felt the fault lay within him for feeling something that had no basis in reality. Pain would imply that there were legitimate reasons why an older man might be worried if he saw a group of young black men following him and that he was unhappy that that reality existed.

In support of this, I found some more context. Here's what Jackson said, "We must face the No. 1 critical issue of our day. It is youth crime in general and black-on-black crime in particular. There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery. Then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved. After all we have been through, just to think we can't walk down our own streets, how humiliating."
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:03 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
In support of this, I found some more context. Here's what Jackson said, "We must face the No. 1 critical issue of our day. It is youth crime in general and black-on-black crime in particular. There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery. Then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved. After all we have been through, just to think we can't walk down our own streets, how humiliating."
You would need to sign up for a free trial to read it, but this link goes to a November 1993 article in the Chicago Sun-Times that gives a longer account of what Jackson said at the PUSH meeting.
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Old 04-15-2010, 05:29 AM
The Great Philosopher The Great Philosopher is offline
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Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
I think you're overcomplicating this.

According to Wikiquote, he made those statements to a meeting of Operation PUSH in Chicago in 1993. They add that he found the feeling "humiliating." The original source (which Wikiquote may not be aware of) may be this Mike Royko column.* If that's the original source, I don't think we're going to find the whole speech. But Rokyo says Jackson was talking about crime in the black community, and I think that makes more sense.
Well that's what I meant: that he was saying there are parts of the country where crime is much higher amongst the black community than the white community, so sometimes even the Reverend is relieved to find he's being followed by someone white, which upsets him.
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Old 04-15-2010, 08:36 AM
muldoonthief muldoonthief is online now
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Did anyone else think was going to be about the "I want to cut his nuts off" comment (which he did apologize for profusely) instead?
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Old 04-15-2010, 10:47 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher View Post
Well that's what I meant: that he was saying there are parts of the country where crime is much higher amongst the black community than the white community, so sometimes even the Reverend is relieved to find he's being followed by someone white, which upsets him.
I think we're in agreement. I just don't know where you're getting the 'some parts of the country' thing. He didn't say that. He was talking about a general feeling and his comments don't seem to be restricted to particular cities or neighborhoods.

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Originally Posted by muldoonthief View Post
Did anyone else think was going to be about the "I want to cut his nuts off" comment (which he did apologize for profusely) instead?
Unfortunately for him, there were cameras and microphones at that one. And YouTube had been invented.
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:06 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Did anyone else think was going to be about the "I want to cut his nuts off" comment (which he did apologize for profusely) instead?
Actually I was thinking this was going to be about Hymietown.
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Old 04-15-2010, 08:32 PM
rowrrbazzle rowrrbazzle is offline
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Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
*There's a discrepancy on the dates here: Wikiquote says he made those comments on December 4, 1993, but the Royko column is from December 1. He says Jackson spoke "last Saturday," which might be November 28.
Try this link for the whole Sun-Times article (I can't guarantee it'll work) http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-searc...&&p_multi=CSTB

The date of the article is given as Monday, Nov. 29, 1993. So "last Saturday" would be Nov. 27. I've updated wikiquote.

Last edited by rowrrbazzle; 04-15-2010 at 08:32 PM..
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Old 04-15-2010, 10:23 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Nice work!
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:05 AM
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What would have been the response of those who are dropping all over themselves to explain "The Rev" if he were white? Oh! Not just white - say Rush or Newt? Would you have accused them of being racist? That is the point to ponder. FBI data indicate that more than 75percent of crimes against black people are by black males under 30.

Last edited by Breadfruit; 04-14-2012 at 08:07 AM..
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:28 AM
Jenaroph Jenaroph is offline
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Well, it's sure fun to speculate about other how other people would be hypocrites, isn't it? Especially zombie hypocrites.

But given the exact sentence as prefaced ("There is nothing more painful to me...") it hardly sounds like someone speaking as an unrepentant racist. It's a thought-provoking comment, a confessional one, whether it came from a black person or a white person. It would be a little bit of a non-sequitur for a white person to reference black-on-black crime and then talk about their own experience walking down the street, but I assume in a necessarily different context, it would still be hard to paint it as anything other than something the speaker regretted.

In the case of Rush or Newt, I'd probably think they were trying to score some good-guy points instead of being sincere, but that's because those two are assholes with histories of being insincere, not because they're white.
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Old 04-14-2012, 08:55 AM
isaiahrobinson isaiahrobinson is offline
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Originally Posted by Breadfruit View Post
What would have been the response of those who are dropping all over themselves to explain "The Rev" if he were white? Oh! Not just white - say Rush or Newt? Would you have accused them of being racist? That is the point to ponder. FBI data indicate that more than 75percent of crimes against black people are by black males under 30.
This is an old thread and I'm not sure why you've resurrected it, but I don't think this comparison makes much sense. The equivalent would be for Rush Limbaugh to say "There is nothing more painful to me ... than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery, then look around and see somebody black and feel relieved." It's in such a radically different context to the Reverend that I don't think it even makes sense to consider it.

Last edited by isaiahrobinson; 04-14-2012 at 08:57 AM..
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  #34  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:00 AM
Baron Greenback Baron Greenback is offline
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Originally Posted by Breadfruit View Post
What would have been the response of those who are dropping all over themselves to explain "The Rev" if he were white? Oh! Not just white - say Rush or Newt? Would you have accused them of being racist? That is the point to ponder. FBI data indicate that more than 75percent of crimes against black people are by black males under 30.

Isn't that what Jesse Jackson was addressing? I mean I've read the entire quote and everything, and I speak as an oppressed white male.
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Old 04-14-2012, 10:32 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Originally Posted by Breadfruit View Post
What would have been the response of those who are dropping all over themselves to explain "The Rev" if he were white? Oh! Not just white - say Rush or Newt? Would you have accused them of being racist? That is the point to ponder. FBI data indicate that more than 75percent of crimes against black people are by black males under 30.
Let me guess. You're just asking questions.

And you probably have black friends.
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