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  #1  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:11 PM
Telcontar Telcontar is offline
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Job app question "Minimum Salary Requirement"

So, I'm filling out a job application and one of the required lines on the online form is "Minimum Salary Requirement." Whats the SD on what companies expect there? I've never encountered it before. The ad in question did not include a pay range or similar.

I think this is a GQ, but it might be a IMHO.
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  #2  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:13 PM
Captain Amazing Captain Amazing is offline
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I'm pretty sure they want to know what the least they can get away paying you is. The question is asking what the minimum salary that you'd accept if you were offered the job.
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  #3  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:16 PM
Frylock Frylock is offline
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I think the only answer can be do the research about typical salaries for the position, decide for yourself how much you want to be paid, and use these two pieces of information to come up with a number to put down.

As for what the company is expecting, what can they be expecting other than a number representing them minimum you are willing to be paid for the position?

I've actually called into companies about this question before (anonymously!) asking what kind of number they are expecting there. I haven't been laughed off the phone yet, so it can't hurt to try. Oc course, they're probably likely to lowball the figure!

No mindgames. Just put down how much you want to get paid.
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  #4  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:19 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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As a business owner, most people who fill out a standard application write, "negotiable" in that block. The few who do not, either leave it blank, or else write, "negoshible".
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  #5  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:24 PM
Telcontar Telcontar is offline
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Originally Posted by Captain Amazing View Post
I'm pretty sure they want to know what the least they can get away paying you is. The question is asking what the minimum salary that you'd accept if you were offered the job.
Well, let me put it this way. In this economy I'd accept X, be surprised at anything lower than X + 10k, and would expect something more in the neighborhood of X+15 to 25k. So X is the honest answer, but it seems rather foolish to tell them that.

Unfortunately the position is such that there really are no "typical salaries" (at least not outside this company). The company down the road pays the "expected" range for someone with my background, but the positions are apples and oranges. I suppose what I'm wondering is whether
1.) They'll screen out people with high answers
Or people with low. Perhaps they don't want you if you don't know the value of the work
2.) They'll bring the number up in negotiation if this reaches the offer stage.
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  #6  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:26 PM
dhkendall dhkendall is offline
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Just covering my ass ...

If you think anything like me, I have to add the words "within reason".

I mean, if someone asks me how much I want to get paid, the number I would give them would have more zeroes than the House of Commons!
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  #7  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:40 PM
Telcontar Telcontar is offline
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
As a business owner, most people who fill out a standard application write, "negotiable" in that block. The few who do not, either leave it blank, or else write, "negoshible".
Missed this before posting. Hmm. It is a webform, otherwise I would definitely do that. I wonder if it will accept string input.

Also, awesome.
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  #8  
Old 04-14-2010, 01:05 PM
Carol the Impaler Carol the Impaler is offline
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Ignore it. This is either a weed-out question or it will lock you into a salary offer if and when you get offered the job.

He who mentions money first loses. Put negotiable if you must.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frylock View Post
No mindgames. Just put down how much you want to get paid.
Only if you want to potentially leave thousands of dollars on the table. You're not playing mind games. You're being a smart negotiator. There is nothing wrong with being a smart negotiator.
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  #9  
Old 04-14-2010, 01:31 PM
joebuck20 joebuck20 is offline
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I always wondered how you're supposed to fill that out on applications for retail or other sorts of hourly jobs (as my wife was doing when she was unemployed last year). If you're applying for a corporate job, you can usually negotiate your salary, but in retail I've found that they have a set salary that they start pretty much all new hourly employees on and there is little to no room for negotiation.
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  #10  
Old 04-14-2010, 01:36 PM
Carol the Impaler Carol the Impaler is offline
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Same advice. Sure, you won't really be negotiating a salary, but if you put down $10.00 and get weeded out when you'd be willing to work for $8.00? Leave it blank.
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  #11  
Old 04-14-2010, 02:45 PM
Frylock Frylock is offline
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Originally Posted by niblet_head View Post
Ignore it. This is either a weed-out question or it will lock you into a salary offer if and when you get offered the job.

He who mentions money first loses. Put negotiable if you must.



Only if you want to potentially leave thousands of dollars on the table. You're not playing mind games. You're being a smart negotiator. There is nothing wrong with being a smart negotiator.
Well, I was going on the assumption that you have to actually put a number there. If leaving it blank is an option or writing "negotiable" then that'd be the thing to do.

If you have to put a number, though, then I can't see how you'd have any option other than to write down a number that your information shows is reasonable and that you would be happy making.
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  #12  
Old 04-14-2010, 02:54 PM
RaftPeople RaftPeople is offline
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Well, I was going on the assumption that you have to actually put a number there. If leaving it blank is an option or writing "negotiable" then that'd be the thing to do.

If you have to put a number, though, then I can't see how you'd have any option other than to write down a number that your information shows is reasonable and that you would be happy making.
If you must enter a number enter 0.

It will keep you from getting weeded out on the high end and you've revealed nothing about your actual limits.
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  #13  
Old 04-14-2010, 04:11 PM
Frylock Frylock is offline
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Originally Posted by RaftPeople View Post
If you must enter a number enter 0.

It will keep you from getting weeded out on the high end and you've revealed nothing about your actual limits.
Yes, the OP should follow this advice.

Just to clarify, though, what I meant is I was assuming it was necessary to enter an informative number in the blank.
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  #14  
Old 04-15-2010, 07:29 AM
cdsilv cdsilv is offline
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How about when asked your current salary? In this 'economy', I've taken much less than I've earned in the past. As I'm now a contractor (not by choice but it was all I could find) and my contract states that I'm not supposed to disclose my rate, would it be acceptable to list my current 'salary' as 'Confidential' - or 'Contractually Undisclosable'?

I'm comfortable with saying that my minimum is negotiable.
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  #15  
Old 04-15-2010, 07:47 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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I think you people are over thinking this. Put in the minimum salary that is reasonable for this position. Then when the talk comes to salary, ask for what you think you are worth. If they call you on the discrepancy, tell them that was just a starting number. If they want you, they will negotiate. If they won't negotiate, you would not have gotten the job by putting in a higher number. At least you got in the door to prove your stuff. That is the purpose of resumes; the rest is up to you.

The notion that your starting salary figure is somehow legally binding is silly, and the question of ethics has nothing to do with it; this is a business transaction. Nothing more, nothing less.

Nobody is going to be fooled by answers like "negotiable".
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  #16  
Old 04-15-2010, 08:10 AM
jtgain jtgain is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
I think you people are over thinking this. Put in the minimum salary that is reasonable for this position. Then when the talk comes to salary, ask for what you think you are worth. If they call you on the discrepancy, tell them that was just a starting number.
"I understand, Mr. Prospective Employee, but in this economy...so many people out of work...profits are down...we can't afford...I had to take a pay cut this year...we can't pay the electric bill......but we were able to beg, steal, and borrow the $X that you stated was an acceptable starting salary. Can you start Monday?"
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  #17  
Old 04-15-2010, 08:35 AM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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I would put open. I wouldn't put any figure down, then later try to argue the point. That may work in normal times, but these are tough times. A company doesn't want to waste time and if you won't take the job at that salary you put down, they'll go on to the next candidate.

Just put open and if they want something more, do a range, such as "$40 - $45" depending on what the job duties are. Or you can say "May I ask what the last person made?" They'll probably give some lame excuse like they can't give out information like that.

I recall in the late 90s / early 00's, I could apply for a job and refuse to fill out an application. I'd say "You have my resume that's good enough. If I get hired, I'll back fill it in." No one, not one company, ever complained. Now no company will allow that. Why? Because too many applicants for one job.

You don't want to do anything that is going to get your application put on the bottom.

Wages have fallen dramatically. I used to be an asst controller in Chicago and the salary was about $50k/year. Now I am going on interviews where they want to pay me $32k and they are getting it. People take any job.

Especially if the job knows you're on unemployment. They only have to offer you a buck more than your last job, and you'll have to take it.
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  #18  
Old 04-15-2010, 09:25 AM
Carol the Impaler Carol the Impaler is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
I think you people are over thinking this. Put in the minimum salary that is reasonable for this position. Then when the talk comes to salary, ask for what you think you are worth. If they call you on the discrepancy, tell them that was just a starting number. If they want you, they will negotiate. If they won't negotiate, you would not have gotten the job by putting in a higher number. At least you got in the door to prove your stuff. That is the purpose of resumes; the rest is up to you.

The notion that your starting salary figure is somehow legally binding is silly, and the question of ethics has nothing to do with it; this is a business transaction. Nothing more, nothing less.

Nobody is going to be fooled by answers like "negotiable".
You're not trying to fool anyone. You are trying to be a smart negotiator. Even in this economy I have made this recommendation to friends and family members and it hasn't negatively affected them one bit.

I'll say it again: he who mentions money first loses. It is very likely, still, that what you may think is reasonable for the position and what the employer thinks is reasonable are two different things. You need to find out what the employer thinks is reasonable first and then go from there. Case in point, I have a friend who just got a new job and bumped her salary almost $24,000 (I'm not kidding) because she did not mention money first. She would have gone in offering to work for what she was currently making or maybe $3-5 grand more. And her new employer, I'm certain, would have loved to have had a very, very talented employee like herself for $20,000 less than what they were willing to pay. What was interesting, too, is that they had no idea what she was currently making. They assumed they'd have to be aggressive in salary to get her and they assumed a much higher starting point. Their idea of what "aggressive" equated to would have been a lot different had they known how little she was making at her old job.

Never ever mention money first.
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Old 04-15-2010, 09:56 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Originally Posted by jtgain View Post
"I understand, Mr. Prospective Employee, but in this economy...so many people out of work...profits are down...we can't afford...I had to take a pay cut this year...we can't pay the electric bill......but we were able to beg, steal, and borrow the $X that you stated was an acceptable starting salary. Can you start Monday?"
"No, I am sorry, after evaluating the skills and responsibilities this job requires, I cannot accept your offer. Best wishes in your search for a candidate for this position."

If you don't have the courage to walk away, you will never get what you are worth, only what the employer would rather spend. It takes balls of brass to get what you deserve.
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Old 04-15-2010, 10:11 AM
Keeve Keeve is offline
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Many posters are presuming that only high numbers are ones that would cause you to get weeded out. That makes no sense to me. If the employer is asking for a number, then it is likely that they will also weed out people who don't answer the question. And giving answers like "negotiable" does NOT mean that you've answered the question to the employer's satisfaction.

That's why I like post #15 the best. I concede that giving a specific number does weaken one's bargaining position, but at least you'll still be in the game.
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  #21  
Old 04-15-2010, 10:49 AM
Citygirl852 Citygirl852 is offline
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Don't employers usually check previous salary when they check references, though? I was under the impression that this was one of the "acceptable" questions to ask previous employers (ending salary). I've always assumed that my potential employer knew what I made at my last job, so inflating my salary requests would be shooting myself in the foot.
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  #22  
Old 04-15-2010, 10:56 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Don't employers usually check previous salary when they check references, though? I was under the impression that this was one of the "acceptable" questions to ask previous employers (ending salary).
I've never had anyone ask me what someone's salary was. If they asked, I'd laugh.
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  #23  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:07 AM
Carol the Impaler Carol the Impaler is offline
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Many posters are presuming that only high numbers are ones that would cause you to get weeded out. That makes no sense to me. If the employer is asking for a number, then it is likely that they will also weed out people who don't answer the question. And giving answers like "negotiable" does NOT mean that you've answered the question to the employer's satisfaction.

That's why I like post #15 the best. I concede that giving a specific number does weaken one's bargaining position, but at least you'll still be in the game.
I've never had that experience. Seriously. I never answer that question. But I wouldn't want to work with an employer (at the professional level, at least) who doesn't understand that salary negotiation is standard practice, like wearing appropriate clothing to an interview. If I'm weeded out for not answering the question, that's a save for me.

Ok, I'll stop banging my drum now.
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:23 AM
Citygirl852 Citygirl852 is offline
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I've never had anyone ask me what someone's salary was. If they asked, I'd laugh.
Interesting. I thought there were three questions they could ask:
  1. Length of employment
  2. Ending Salary
  3. Would you hire again?

Huh....this is something to ponder.
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  #25  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:36 AM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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Well, let me put it this way. In this economy I'd accept X, be surprised at anything lower than X + 10k, and would expect something more in the neighborhood of X+15 to 25k. So X is the honest answer, but it seems rather foolish to tell them that.

Unfortunately the position is such that there really are no "typical salaries" (at least not outside this company). The company down the road pays the "expected" range for someone with my background, but the positions are apples and oranges. I suppose what I'm wondering is whether
1.) They'll screen out people with high answers
Or people with low. Perhaps they don't want you if you don't know the value of the work
2.) They'll bring the number up in negotiation if this reaches the offer stage.
Having been in both situations (looking for a job and being a manager needing to hire people)...

This could be a question in good faith but clumsily done. However, I have been guilty of using such measures out of desperation.

You see, when you are a hiring manager for a small company and/or a company that doesn't pay all that well and you put out a job ad you will get tons of responses. 2 things can trip you up regarding salary:

- You bring someone in for an interview and they think they are applying for a position much better paying than it is*. This way I, as a hiring manager, can weed out people that think the position is more senior than it is. This is not necessarily hurting the job seeker but stopping us from wasting each others time.

- Because your company doesn't pay that well, you cannot expect to get the best out there. Knowing what they expect means that you avoid the job seekers that know what they are worth but what your company will not allow you to pay.

From my point of view, I was authorised to pay at most $x. $x was already too low. I was not trying to get people for less than $x. However, I didn't want to waste my time and the job seekers time going through all the interview process and hitting a brick wall during the offer. Gawd that was frustrating! This caused me to start doing stupid, clumsy things like asking minimum salary acceptable. However, if you had put $40,000 as min and I believed market wage was $50K and was authorised to pay $44K...I would offer you $44K. If you put down $50K, then I knew I couldn't get you and so wouldn't interview you.

I never did this written though. I would have called you and asked. This way you couldn't weasel out by putting 'negotiable".

However, I am not normal and others probably do use that to try to get you cheap.

====

One thing to note - The earlier the company fishes around for salary the less they will likely pay. Pre-interview phone calls fishing for salary or asking on forms is a huge red flag - this company doesn't pay well so we need to know this info so as not to waste our time.

Good companies will not usually fish around for salary expectation because they KNOW they pay market rate or higher and so it is not an issue.

It doesn't mean you shouldn't interview at these fishing companies...but realize why they are doing this.




* An example that happened to me here was I went on an interview, it went well and received an offer. For $30,000. I was shocked and she then asked what I thought the position would pay. I brought out my data showing $90-$100K. She was shocked - even more shocked when I told her what I was currently making. If she would have had some idea of what I thought the position should pay then she would not of interviewed me or (less likely) realize that she was bat-shit crazy when she received info from all the others with exepctation well north of $30K. It is an extreme example dealing with someone totally disconnected from reality but it shows what can happen.

Last edited by BlinkingDuck; 04-15-2010 at 11:40 AM..
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  #26  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:42 AM
Clark Cello Clark Cello is offline
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Originally Posted by Citygirl852 View Post
Interesting. I thought there were three questions they could ask:
  1. Length of employment
  2. Ending Salary
  3. Would you hire again?

Huh....this is something to ponder.
Sure they can ask. But most won't give it to them, and because of this, most won't ask. My employer, one of the largest in the country, would not even consider giving out a former employe's salary information.

Last edited by Clark Cello; 04-15-2010 at 11:42 AM..
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  #27  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:45 AM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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One other thing.

If you put, say, $40K as your lowest acceptable salary and then that is what they offer and you say you want $55K and they bring up your form saying $40K...that is easy to defeat. Just say you have other companies interested in you and that $55K seems to be the market rate for the position...and you feel that you are damned good at your job and that you should get at least market rate.
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  #28  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:49 AM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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How about when asked your current salary? In this 'economy', I've taken much less than I've earned in the past. As I'm now a contractor (not by choice but it was all I could find) and my contract states that I'm not supposed to disclose my rate, would it be acceptable to list my current 'salary' as 'Confidential' - or 'Contractually Undisclosable'?

I'm comfortable with saying that my minimum is negotiable.
Companies do not like to hire people that used to make more in the past. They tend to be a little bitter about this and will also demand more money or leave when the economy gets better.
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  #29  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:51 AM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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I think you people are over thinking this. Put in the minimum salary that is reasonable for this position. Then when the talk comes to salary, ask for what you think you are worth. If they call you on the discrepancy, tell them that was just a starting number. If they want you, they will negotiate. If they won't negotiate, you would not have gotten the job by putting in a higher number. At least you got in the door to prove your stuff. That is the purpose of resumes; the rest is up to you.

The notion that your starting salary figure is somehow legally binding is silly, and the question of ethics has nothing to do with it; this is a business transaction. Nothing more, nothing less.

Nobody is going to be fooled by answers like "negotiable".
This.

Don't put negotiable. Do your research and put in a reasonable (but relatively low) number. However, don't let them use this to bind you.
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:54 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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However, if you had put $40,000 as min and I believed market wage was $50K and was authorised to pay $44K...I would offer you $44K..
It seems the most efficient approach given your employer's constraints would be to state up front, "This position pays $44k, non-negotiable. Is that acceptable to you?" That way your time and the applicant's time is not wasted dancing around the "minimum salary requirement" question.
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:56 AM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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Originally Posted by Keeve View Post
Many posters are presuming that only high numbers are ones that would cause you to get weeded out. That makes no sense to me. If the employer is asking for a number, then it is likely that they will also weed out people who don't answer the question. And giving answers like "negotiable" does NOT mean that you've answered the question to the employer's satisfaction.

That's why I like post #15 the best. I concede that giving a specific number does weaken one's bargaining position, but at least you'll still be in the game.
No.

Negotiable is a perfectly valid response. You are just being smart. It would not get you weeded out with me.

However, it will provoke a phone call.

I still think having the balls to put down a number that is well researched will do you good as well. However, there is nothing wrong with 'negotiable'. If the company thinks there is then that is a sucky company and thank God they weeded you out.
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  #32  
Old 04-15-2010, 12:00 PM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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It seems the most efficient approach given your employer's constraints would be to state up front, "This position pays $44k, non-negotiable. Is that acceptable to you?" That way your time and the applicant's time is not wasted dancing around the "minimum salary requirement" question.
This is what would happen during the initial phone call where the person had balls to stand up to me.

If it was obvious that the person would not flinch and mention salary first then I did do exactly what you have written above. Something like "I am authorised to offer at most $44K for this position. I am highly doubtful I can get the owner to offer more. Should we proceed with the interview process?"

Be aware though, I was in bad position. The MOST I could offer was underpaying. Hopefully most hiring managers were not/are not in that situation that I was in back then.

Now, thank heavens, the company work for believes in paying ABOVE market rate...and so I don't have to bring up salary until the offer. If they reject my offer it is NOT because of salary Much, much better.

I, now, never to pre-interview phone calls, require forms to be filled out etc.

Last edited by BlinkingDuck; 04-15-2010 at 12:04 PM..
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  #33  
Old 04-15-2010, 01:51 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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One of the pieces of advice that I've come across is to state a range (e.g. $50,000 to $60,000) - you can put what you really want and think is reasonable in the middle - thus you still have some protection if they're weeding out everyone above 50k.
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  #34  
Old 04-15-2010, 02:49 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by BlinkingDuck View Post
This.

Don't put negotiable. Do your research and put in a reasonable (but relatively low) number. However, don't let them use this to bind you.
So, when you buy a car, if the salesman asks what the most is you will pay do you give him an honest answer, hoping to go lower? You've just set a minimum price. Assuming this is higher than he was willing to go, he might cut it below your max, making you feel good, while being a lot higher than he was willing to go.
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  #35  
Old 04-15-2010, 02:52 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Sure they can ask. But most won't give it to them, and because of this, most won't ask. My employer, one of the largest in the country, would not even consider giving out a former employe's salary information.
Nick at Ask the Headhunter is dead set against giving this information. His suggested response is why a company wants to follow what another company says. Your salary should be based on your value to the new company. I think technically salary is considered proprietary (wouldn't company A like to know what company B pays specifically) and so should not be disclosed. Certainly not without your permission.
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  #36  
Old 04-15-2010, 02:53 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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It seems the most efficient approach given your employer's constraints would be to state up front, "This position pays $44k, non-negotiable. Is that acceptable to you?" That way your time and the applicant's time is not wasted dancing around the "minimum salary requirement" question.
How about a range, depending on experience and qualifications? That will keep away those wildly out of line, while giving some wiggle room.
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  #37  
Old 04-15-2010, 02:56 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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"No, I am sorry, after evaluating the skills and responsibilities this job requires, I cannot accept your offer. Best wishes in your search for a candidate for this position."

If you don't have the courage to walk away, you will never get what you are worth, only what the employer would rather spend. It takes balls of brass to get what you deserve.
This strategy might work a lot better when the unemployment rate hits 5%, or if you just finished walking on water in your interview. Not that walking isn't an option, but why shoot yourself in the foot? Walking when they offer you a salary you said you would take is not going to make them want to call you back.
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Old 04-15-2010, 03:42 PM
jtgain jtgain is offline
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
This strategy might work a lot better when the unemployment rate hits 5%, or if you just finished walking on water in your interview. Not that walking isn't an option, but why shoot yourself in the foot? Walking when they offer you a salary you said you would take is not going to make them want to call you back.
This. They asked you how much you would take. You said $X. They offered you $x and you said no. Unless there truly was something specific about the job that you can say you didn't understand or was poorly explained, I can't see how that is a reasonable position to take.

Think of buying a car:

You: I'll give you $24k and not a penny more!
Salesman: Deal!
You: How about $23-five?
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  #39  
Old 04-15-2010, 05:12 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citygirl852 View Post
Interesting. I thought there were three questions they could ask:
  1. Length of employment
  2. Ending Salary
  3. Would you hire again?

Huh....this is something to ponder.
I own a small business in a specific niche. I've had people ask all sorts of stuff. Like "She sure is hot. Was her reason for leaving related to this?"

I usually just confirm the length of employment and that's that. In one particular instance, with a real psycho ex-employee and a potential employer I'm friends with, I was honest. "Don't hire her. And you owe me dinner.". I collected.
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  #40  
Old 04-15-2010, 05:20 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
This strategy might work a lot better when the unemployment rate hits 5%, or if you just finished walking on water in your interview. Not that walking isn't an option, but why shoot yourself in the foot? Walking when they offer you a salary you said you would take is not going to make them want to call you back.
It is true if your skill set is a dime a dozen, or you know you don't interview well, you are behind the 8-ball and in no position to try to increase their offer. In that case, the best answer to the "minimum salary required" question is, "What ever you are offering!".

Last edited by Fear Itself; 04-15-2010 at 05:22 PM..
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  #41  
Old 04-15-2010, 05:51 PM
Cillasi Cillasi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Cello View Post
Sure they can ask. But most won't give it to them, and because of this, most won't ask. My employer, one of the largest in the country, would not even consider giving out a former employe's salary information.
Salary information is generally confirmed, not given. The third question is usually posed "Is the person eligible for rehire." Keeps out personal opinion and gets an answer based on company policy.
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  #42  
Old 04-15-2010, 06:36 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
It is true if your skill set is a dime a dozen, or you know you don't interview well, you are behind the 8-ball and in no position to try to increase their offer. In that case, the best answer to the "minimum salary required" question is, "What ever you are offering!".
In those cases you will never have lots of jobs available. However I know plenty of people with skills that are definitely not dime a dozen who took over six months to find a job in this economy.

Actually, when I got asked that question on the phone, I'd say my current salary plus 10% or 15%. I figured even if this was a lowball salary for the job, I'd still be happy, and it was not absurdly out of the ballpark.
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  #43  
Old 04-16-2010, 12:40 PM
steadierfooting steadierfooting is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlinkingDuck View Post

- You bring someone in for an interview and they think they are applying for a position much better paying than it is*. This way I, as a hiring manager, can weed out people that think the position is more senior than it is. This is not necessarily hurting the job seeker but stopping us from wasting each others time.

- Because your company doesn't pay that well, you cannot expect to get the best out there. Knowing what they expect means that you avoid the job seekers that know what they are worth but what your company will not allow you to pay.
I agree with this. For most average paying jobs, I think it's fine to leave it blank. When you get into more specialized or higher paying jobs, it helps weed people out for people that are on the fence with skills. I was called by a company I applied for a Sr. Analyst position and my range was about 50K more than what the company paid. I think a +-20K isn't going to have someone pass on the interview, but in my case I always make sure to put my salary requirements. There's no way in hell I'd take a 50K pay cut and I'd rather have us waste each others time.
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