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  #1  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:21 AM
bizerta bizerta is offline
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How do pro sports teams travel around?

I'm talking about teams like NFL, Major-League baseball, NBA, NHL, etc.

As a kid, I remember when the westernmost MLB team was in Kansas City and they all took trains (with private cars). When the Dodgers and Giants moved to California, jets were introduced.

Do all/some teams have their own private jets? If so, what does the darn thing do between gigs. If the Yankees have a 3-game road trip in Atlanta, does the jet just sit on the ground (and the pilots on the payroll) for three days? Does the plane just sit on the Albuquerque desert during the off season? Do the teams "rent" their planes to airlines/charter_companies when not in use by the team?

Do charter companies have contracts with the teams? Does (for example) a charter company fly the Bears from Chicago to Dallas and then deadhead to Providence to fly the Patriots to Denver (and then sit around for the rest of the NFL week?) Are the planes substantially modified to hold sports teams? Even a 120 seat 737 probably has many of the seats removed. (They may be so modular that a modification may only take a few hours).

Since they (especially baseball) have pretty tight schedules, how are weather delays handled? If the Islanders run into a snow storm traveling to Montreal, do they divert to Burlington, VT, and hire a bus? Has a pro-game ever been canceled because one of the teams just-couldn't-make-it?

If there's a long time between gigs, do the players come home. For example, if the Redskins play in San Francisco on Monday and then play in San Diego the following Sunday, do they return to Washington for a few days, or do they stay on the west coast?

Do any teams travel commercial? If not, what's the largest pro-sports team that does use commercial?

Last edited by bizerta; 06-03-2010 at 10:25 AM..
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  #2  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:24 AM
SandyHook SandyHook is offline
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I am very proud to say that I was the first to view this vital question.
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  #3  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:31 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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At least some teams have private jets. Here's a blurry picture of the NY Giants' jet (you can still make out the team logo on the tail).

A better pic of the tail section of the Dallas Cowboys' private jet, and of the Pittsburgh Steelers' jet.

Last edited by bordelond; 06-03-2010 at 10:32 AM..
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  #4  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:32 AM
Whack-a-Mole Whack-a-Mole is offline
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I can't speak for all teams but the Chicago Bears charter flights (I know they use United a lot and presume they have a contract with them). They'll charter a flight to the destination then one back (they always return to Chicago after a game). Whether the charter company lets the plane sit waiting or uses it for other purposes I have no idea. I presume if they can squeeze in another flight they will do that. They just need a plane to take the team back at the appointed time.

Pro teams, especially football, has a lot of people to move. No way they are buying tickets on a scheduled flight.
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:35 AM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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Many (most?) teams travel by charter aircraft - the plane does not belong to the team. The Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs and Raptors, Edmonton Oilers, Calgary Flames and Vancouver Canucks all use Air Canada Jetz (I wonder what the Senators use?). There was a bit of an issue last summer with the FAA enforcing anti-cabotage rules, meaning that the Canadian-based planes couldn't travel between two US points without first returning to Canada (you can imagine how this would screw up a sport's team's travel plans on road trips!), but I think certain exemptions were made.

I believe the Canadiens use a bus to go to Ottawa for games against the Sens, though, since it's really only a 2 hour drive.
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:35 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bizerta View Post
If there's a long time between gigs, do the players come home. For example, if the Redskins play in San Francisco on Monday and then play in San Diego the following Sunday, do they return to Washington for a few days, or do they stay on the west coast?
NFL teams invariably come back home between road trips AFAIK. In the other three major North American pro sports (NBA, MLB, NHL), teams will, of course, play multiple opponents in different cities on a single road trip.
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  #7  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:38 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Several team planes turned up in a Google Images search of the simple terms "team plane". The Dallas Mavericks (NBA), Detroit Pistons (NBA), Phoenix Suns (NBA), and Seattle Seahawks (NFL) team planes are pictured on pg 1 alone.
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  #8  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:39 AM
brickbacon brickbacon is offline
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Originally Posted by bizerta View Post
Do all/some teams have their own private jets?
Almost all professional teams have private jets due to the nature of their travel. Some teams own their own jets, other teams use charter companies like this one, or charter private jets with regular airlines.

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Originally Posted by bizerta View Post
If so, what does the darn thing do between gigs. If the Yankees have a 3-game road trip in Atlanta, does the jet just sit on the ground (and the pilots on the payroll) for three days?
I would imagine it depends on the circumstances. If they charter a private plane with an established airline, I would imagine the plane goes whenever the airline needs it to go. If they own the jet, the owner probably does whatever they want. It's just a (relatively small) cost of doing business.
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  #9  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:42 AM
hogarth hogarth is online now
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
Many (most?) teams travel by charter aircraft - the plane does not belong to the team. The Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs and Raptors, Edmonton Oilers, Calgary Flames and Vancouver Canucks all use Air Canada Jetz (I wonder what the Senators use?).
In 2001, I flew on an Air Canada charter flight to the Bahamas using the same plane used by the Toronto Raptors for road trips (at least that's what someone told me).

You would not believe the legroom on that flight. Just about spoiled me for life.
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  #10  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:42 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
Many (most?) teams travel by charter aircraft - the plane does not belong to the team.
I had the thought that the NHL teams would have a lower proportion of teams owning planes than the other three North American leagues. The Florida Panthers do have a jet, at least.
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  #11  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:45 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by brickbacon View Post
If they own the jet, the owner probably does whatever they want. It's just a (relatively small) cost of doing business.
The pilot and crew would probably be on some kind of retainer/annual salary set up anyway, right?

How do pilots get paid by commercial airlines? Does a pilot who flies, say, 60 flights in a year make some more than a pilot that flies 57 flights because of those extra three flights? Or is it done by time ... paid by hours in the air? Or some other way?
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  #12  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:49 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
NFL teams invariably come back home between road trips AFAIK.
That's nearly always the case. There have been a few cases in which, for example, an East Coast team has two consecutive games on the West Coast, and will find a place to stay and practice on the West Coast during the intervening week (rather than subject the team to four 5-7 hour flights over the course of a little over a week), but that's pretty infrequent.

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Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
In the other three major North American pro sports (NBA, MLB, NHL), teams will, of course, play multiple opponents in different cities on a single road trip.
Yup. In those leagues, most teams have road trips with several games (series in baseball) in a row. Often, the schedule-makers will try to place some level of proximity on those trips -- for example, a Midwestern team might play several West Coast opponents in a row during the same road trip.
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  #13  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:49 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Another one: Seattle Mariners' (MLB) team plane.
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  #14  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:52 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Originally Posted by bizerta View Post
Since they (especially baseball) have pretty tight schedules, how are weather delays handled? If the Islanders run into a snow storm traveling to Montreal, do they divert to Burlington, VT, and hire a bus? Has a pro-game ever been canceled because one of the teams just-couldn't-make-it?
You do occasionally have instances of teams whose travel gets disrupted due to weather...just like any business traveler, they try to find another option to get to the destination on time.

You'll very rarely see a game not go off because one of the teams is stuck, due to weather or mechanical problems (they usually do pad the travel schedule, for that reason). When that happens, the game will almost always be postponed until a later date.
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  #15  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:54 AM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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The topmost picture here is listed as "the Houston Rockets team plane", and yet it is simply painted white all over. No logo or anything. I wonder if logos & paint were applied later.

EDIT: A pic of the Miami Heat's team plane.

Last edited by bordelond; 06-03-2010 at 10:57 AM..
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  #16  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:57 AM
fiddlesticks fiddlesticks is offline
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Here's an American Airlines charter bringing the St. Louis Rams to Appleton, WI before a game with the Green Bay Packers. 757's aren't the usual traffic for that airport.
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  #17  
Old 06-03-2010, 10:59 AM
apollonia apollonia is offline
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Very occasionally in the winter NHL teams will run into trouble flying into and out of cities and you'll hear the announcers discuss "such-and-such team didn't get into town until three o'clock this morning," or whatever. Policy tends to depend on the coach's ideas about how fresh the team is--the game won't be cancelled or forfeited, but the coach may very well dump a morning practice or change the time to let the players get more sleep.

NHL teams just about invariably leave town the same night as their game--many, many night flights for these guys. The schedule can be tight, but not nearly as tight as baseball, and I believe the league has a rule designed encouraging teams to leave the night of a game specifically so weather will be as little of an issue as possible.

Most teams use charter planes.
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  #18  
Old 06-03-2010, 11:04 AM
brickbacon brickbacon is offline
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Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
The pilot and crew would probably be on some kind of retainer/annual salary set up anyway, right?

How do pilots get paid by commercial airlines? Does a pilot who flies, say, 60 flights in a year make some more than a pilot that flies 57 flights because of those extra three flights? Or is it done by time ... paid by hours in the air? Or some other way?
I'm sure circumstances vary, but anecdotally, I can say with some confidence that the Dallas Mavericks do have people on their payroll. Not sure how much, or how they are paid, but I believe they work when Mark Cuban travels, and if for some reason, he decides to loan/rent out his jet as well.

I believe commercial pilots are paid a salary based on a set number of hours with limited overtime being paid for anything above that. Salaries would likely be based on experience, seniority, etc. I am sure a pilot will be along to correct or expound upon the above.
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  #19  
Old 06-03-2010, 11:42 AM
Sinisterniik Sinisterniik is offline
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Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
I had the thought that the NHL teams would have a lower proportion of teams owning planes than the other three North American leagues. The Florida Panthers do have a jet, at least.
I was under the impression that the NY Rangers use charter buses for local games and will let their players take the subway to play games in Long Island.

At least they used to. They very well may have their own jet by now. Of course, they'd still have to take a bus to LaGuardia/JFK...

My Dad once saw former Ranger prospect Jamie Lundmark on a flight to training camp, but that probably doesn't count. He also saw Henrik Lundqvist flying business class, but I'm not sure if it was mid-season or not.
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  #20  
Old 06-03-2010, 11:45 AM
Sinisterniik Sinisterniik is offline
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I found this link along the way. It gives the impression that most teams charter flights with specific companies:

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo...d.main/255198/
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  #21  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:24 PM
anson2995 anson2995 is offline
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Originally Posted by bordelond View Post
At least some teams have private jets. Here's a blurry picture of the NY Giants' jet (you can still make out the team logo on the tail).
The NY Giants don't own a plane. They fly charters. I covered the team for many years for one of the NYC papers. Maybe they paint their logo on a plane as a part of some promotion, I dunno.

It wouldn't make any sense to own a jumbo jet that you're going to use 8-10 times a year.

Last edited by anson2995; 06-03-2010 at 01:25 PM..
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  #22  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:26 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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In 2001, I flew on an Air Canada charter flight to the Bahamas using the same plane used by the Toronto Raptors for road trips (at least that's what someone told me).

You would not believe the legroom on that flight. Just about spoiled me for life.
My understanding of it is that they have a handful of planes, all the same type and configuration, so while your specific plane may generally be based in Toronto, it isn't necessarily "the Raptor's plane", but rather the most likely one for them to take. And I think the website says the planes are all business class configuration, too.

When Hal Gill was injured in the series against Pittsburgh, he ended up having to take commercial flights back to Montreal after having spent the night in the hospital. He had to travel via Philly since there was nothing direct, and it seems he kept getting nagged at by the flight attendants for sticking his (injured) leg out into the aisle. Injury or not, I'm thinking at 6'8", there wouldn't be a lot of legroom for him on standard commercial planes (likely regional jets).
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  #23  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:38 PM
BwanaBob BwanaBob is offline
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Originally Posted by Sinisterniik View Post
I was under the impression that the NY Rangers use charter buses for local games and will let their players take the subway to play games in Long Island.

..
There is no subway out on Long Island. All trains in Nassau & Suffolk Counties are above ground. That said, there is also no reasonably close LIRR station to the Nassau Coliseum. Ergo, the Rangers do not use trains to go play the Islanders.
I'm sure they use a team bus.
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  #24  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:44 PM
hogarth hogarth is online now
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Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
My understanding of it is that they have a handful of planes, all the same type and configuration, so while your specific plane may generally be based in Toronto, it isn't necessarily "the Raptor's plane", but rather the most likely one for them to take. And I think the website says the planes are all business class configuration, too.
I took that claim with a grain of salt.

But the plane I was on was about 5' from seat-back to seat-back, I think. I'm 6'2", and I slouched down as far as I could go in my seat and I still couldn't touch the seat in front of me with my toe! If that's business class, sign me up!
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  #25  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:45 PM
anson2995 anson2995 is offline
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There is no subway out on Long Island. All trains in Nassau & Suffolk Counties are above ground. That said, there is also no reasonably close LIRR station to the Nassau Coliseum. Ergo, the Rangers do not use trains to go play the Islanders.
I'm sure they use a team bus.
I agree, although I'm sure I'm not the only one who has taken the LIRR to Westbury and hopped a cab from there.... it's about two miles from the station to the rink.
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  #26  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:53 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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When I worked at the Westin Michigan Ave in Chicago, we had all the "regular" sports teams. By that I mean teams with money like the NY Yankees stayed at the Ritz (No seriously they did)

What impressed me was how well organized the teams were. No funny stuffy, no unpaid bills, no women in the rooms. When they checked in they had a traveling secretary that got the keys and paid the bills and explained to the players, if they dared to charge anything to the room and not pay, they'd have hell to pay for it.

The traveling secretary would explain, no women in the room, if they had girlfriends, they just better go to her house or rent another hotel room in a completely different hotel.

I used to have to overlook all the contracts in the hotel for all groups, and one funny thing was all the sports teams had clauses that let them out of their contract for things that related to superstitions. Like one time a player from St Louis died in the room (natural causes) and the St Louis team now considered the Westin to be jinxed so they got let out of their contract.

Kind of interesting huh?

The sports teams were excellent business. Paid well and no issues or problems
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  #27  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:56 PM
Sinisterniik Sinisterniik is offline
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Originally Posted by BwanaBob View Post
There is no subway out on Long Island. All trains in Nassau & Suffolk Counties are above ground. That said, there is also no reasonably close LIRR station to the Nassau Coliseum. Ergo, the Rangers do not use trains to go play the Islanders.
I'm sure they use a team bus.
That makes sense concerning the subways, but are you certain that they don't take a train? I just Googled it:

http://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-8...ed=0CC4QtgMwAA


Apparently many teams do take trains regularly, though. Here's one of many examples of NHL teams in the NE making due with the rails (from http://www.nhl.com/ice/news.htm?id=511688):

Quote:
Riding the rails -- The Flyers are riding the rails this week. They took a train from Philadelphia to New York City Tuesday afternoon and they hired a private train to take them from Penn Station in New York to Boston Wednesday night, right after the game with the Rangers.

Last edited by Sinisterniik; 06-03-2010 at 01:56 PM.. Reason: broken link
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  #28  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:57 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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NHL was not 100% charter as of 10 years ago because my brother saw the Edmonton Oilers at the airport here in Raleigh and they were on a normal flight. Carolina Hurricanes are 100% charter , they used to use a local charter company but that company went bust so I don't know who they charter with now.
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  #29  
Old 06-03-2010, 01:59 PM
Sinisterniik Sinisterniik is offline
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Well that last Google link doesn't appear to work. If you use Google Maps' direction service and select public transit, you'll see that the Rangers can get to the Coliseum significantly faster by making a single train transfer and a 7 minute bus/taxi/limo ride than if they drove the whole distance.
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Old 06-03-2010, 02:00 PM
Jayrot Jayrot is offline
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Travel and accommodation is one of the the often overlooked "home court advantages" for teams -- it's not just that the home crowd is cheering.

Even though baseball and basketball players have a well established routine for travelling, there's something to be said for sleeping in your own bed and showering at your own house, and then just showing up to the stadium or arena at the designated time.
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  #31  
Old 06-03-2010, 02:05 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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One funny thing is the home team players will normally still put on a suit and tie to drive to the game even though they may only wear it for 15 minutes. (At least they do in the NHL.) I know a few years ago the NBA cracked down on clothes for their players , they had to require a certain level of dress when the players are traveling. Not sure about the NFL or MLB dress codes.
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  #32  
Old 06-03-2010, 02:12 PM
Snarky_Kong Snarky_Kong is offline
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MLS teams are forbidden to charter flights. I'm not sure if they fly first class or not. Probably depends on the team.
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  #33  
Old 06-03-2010, 02:15 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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MLS teams have low budgets so that probably led to the no charter rule.
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  #34  
Old 06-03-2010, 02:42 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by anson2995 View Post
The NY Giants don't own a plane. They fly charters ... It wouldn't make any sense to own a jumbo jet that you're going to use 8-10 times a year.
Be that as it may, many sports owners own private jets, and allow their teams to fly on them. Presumably the economics work out in the end.
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Old 06-03-2010, 03:10 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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Be that as it may, many sports owners own private jets, and allow their teams to fly on them. Presumably the economics work out in the end.
The private jets owned by the team owners are more likely to be business jets than they are to be ones with configurations able to carry the entire team, associated staff and equipment to and from games on a regular basis. Most business jets are in the 3-20 passenger range, so even the largest ones wouldn't accommodate an entire hockey team, for example.

There are so-called "heavy jets' based on the A318/A320 model, or the various Boeing aircraft, but these are more likely to have bedrooms and office suites than they are to have lots of seating, and are also more likely to be used by governments and such than they are by individual owners. I'm sure there are a few out there, but I suspect they aren't being used for sports teams all that often.
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  #36  
Old 06-03-2010, 03:22 PM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Slightly related, I assume modern multi-million-dollar-a-year athletes get individual rooms. According to Bill Bradley's book, even as recently as the mid-70's athletes had roommates on the road.

Anybody have any idea when the shift was made?
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Old 06-03-2010, 03:24 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
Slightly related, I assume modern multi-million-dollar-a-year athletes get individual rooms. According to Bill Bradley's book, even as recently as the mid-70's athletes had roommates on the road.

Anybody have any idea when the shift was made?
... I'd have thought sharing hotel rooms was still common. Though I'm sure some superstars are exceptions.
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  #38  
Old 06-03-2010, 03:49 PM
Gagundathar Gagundathar is offline
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Sharing rooms?
That's nuts!
While I am a fairly well paid professional, I don't make NEAR the salary that any NFL player does and I NEVER have to share a room with my technician.

My beloved Atlanta Braves fly charter jets provided by Delta Airlines.
They use a charter bus service to get back and forth from the stadium to the airport when they begin a road trip (as they did after whipping the Phillies yesterday).
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  #39  
Old 06-03-2010, 04:04 PM
t-bonham@scc.net t-bonham@scc.net is offline
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In October, 1988, many of the Minnesota Vikings team members got food poisoning from contaminated sandwiches served from an airline kitchen (probably Northwest). An investigation by the Minnesota Department of Health identified over 700 people from 200+ flights who got sick, this was confirmed by tests for about 250 of the people.

So presumably the Vikings flew on a Northwest Airlines plane, either a regular flight or charter.

P.S. The Vikings lost their game to Miami, probably because so many players were ill. Several were running off the field to vomit between plays or at half time.
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  #40  
Old 06-03-2010, 04:13 PM
bordelond bordelond is offline
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Sharing rooms?
That's nuts!
While I am a fairly well paid professional, I don't make NEAR the salary that any NFL player does and I NEVER have to share a room with my technician.
Yeah, but it's team sports. There's a level of camaraderie involved.

I'm sure stars getting individual hotel rooms is done more today than it used to be. But I have definitely heard of current NFL players having roommates on road trips. Off to Google.
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  #41  
Old 06-03-2010, 04:19 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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A lot of hockey teams still have roommate arrangements on trips. Offhand I know that Tomas Plekanec and Jaroslav Halak are (were? I hope not!) usually roommates, and I recall a story about a Shark's player who got his own room after "only" 3 years in the league because no one could put up with his snoring. Some goalies might get their own rooms too, since by all accounts many of them are completely insane.

It's a teammates/family/camaraderie thing.
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  #42  
Old 06-03-2010, 04:44 PM
apollonia apollonia is offline
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Most hockey teams have their players share rooms, with some exceptions:

Players who have played over a certain number of games get their own room--possibly 500, 700, etc.
Team captains generally get their own room.
Starting goaltenders often get their own room or share at their own request--most teams cotton to their goaltender's choice as far as that goes.

Players are certainly welcome to have their own rooms if they don't qualify, but they'll pay for it out of their own pocket, and they'll face a certain stigma among their teammates of "not wanting to be around the team" and consequently, not wanting to be a team player. Team sports is not exactly like ordinary business travel.
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  #43  
Old 06-03-2010, 05:24 PM
Morbo Morbo is offline
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Like one time a player from St Louis died in the room (natural causes) and the St Louis team now considered the Westin to be jinxed so they got let out of their contract.
Darryl Kile, I'm guessing?
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  #44  
Old 06-03-2010, 05:34 PM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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Some high paid guys get a single room in their contract but I think sharing is still common.
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  #45  
Old 06-03-2010, 11:53 PM
pilot141 pilot141 is offline
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Originally Posted by brickbacon View Post
I'm sure circumstances vary, but anecdotally, I can say with some confidence that the Dallas Mavericks do have people on their payroll. Not sure how much, or how they are paid, but I believe they work when Mark Cuban travels, and if for some reason, he decides to loan/rent out his jet as well.

I believe commercial pilots are paid a salary based on a set number of hours with limited overtime being paid for anything above that. Salaries would likely be based on experience, seniority, etc. I am sure a pilot will be along to correct or expound upon the above.
Not to hijack, but I should at least answer this.

Corporate guys usually are paid differently than airline guys. For example the pilots who fly Mark Cuban's jet are (normally) hired into that position on a salary, with the understanding that they can be very busy (ie during the NBA season) but can also expect lots of time off during the rest of the year. How much you are expected to work, and more importantly, how quickly you can be available to work influence how much you are paid.

One guy can be flying a G-IV and make $90K a year as a captain in a really cushy job. Another guy can be on call 24-7 and make $100K, $120K, or even $200K depending on who hires him and the experience/availability required.

So corporate and/or private jet guys (and by guys I mean both men and women - it's just easier to type) are almost strictly salary-based.

Airline guys are almost strictly hourly-based. You get paid a fixed amount per hour, and get get paid for the hours you fly. The hourly rate differs by airplane (bigger usually pays more) and seat (Captain pays more than First Officer). International usually pays more than domestic, and so on. There are many variables, of course - most jobs (in the US at least) have a minimum pay per day provision, so that the airline can't have you fly to Sao Paulo, sit for 5 days with no pay and then fly back.

In any case, flying charters for sports teams pays the same as any other trip. The layovers might be nicer or longer, but you have to be ready to go when the team is ready, so some flexibility is required. Most teams that have major airline hubs in their city try to do charters to not only save money but also for good local PR. Think the Seattle Mariners riding on Alaska Airlines, or the Atlanta Braves riding on Delta.

Of course it's all variable - I seem to see NFL team using charters more than others because they normally have only 8 away games a year, so maintaining a jet, a crew and everything else might not make a lot of sense. NBA and MLB teams who have a lot of road games over a long season tend to have their own jets. Although a lot of those jets are just charters run by their local airline, albeit with a custom painted jet. The jet says "Suns" but it's an America West (sorry - USAir) jet with USAir guys flying it.

Anyway, back to the sharing of rooms discussion!
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  #46  
Old 06-04-2010, 12:49 AM
Foldup Rabbit Foldup Rabbit is offline
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Here is a nice (slightly convoluted) breakdown of the Canucks road trip during GM Place's Olympic break - the longest roadtrip in NHL history. The team drove 160 miles and spent just under 31 hours in the air. So when the cities are close enough, they do bus. There is a woman on staff whose entire job is to coordinate travel for the team and assorted executives. The flights are chartered through Air Canada Jazz - the plane is all spiffed up with logo seat covers and whatnot, but it's still a Jazz plane.
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  #47  
Old 06-04-2010, 01:04 AM
Darth Sensitive Darth Sensitive is offline
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I know that Tony Romo is roomies with Jason Witten on road trips. Announcers comment on that kinda stuff when they hit each other on broken plays.


QUICK! WHO ROOMED WITH COLT MCCOY AT UT THE PAST FEW YEARS? ANSWER NOW OR MUSBURGER WILL CALL GAMES FOREVER!
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  #48  
Old 06-04-2010, 01:36 AM
Snarky_Kong Snarky_Kong is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bijou Drains View Post
MLS teams have low budgets so that probably led to the no charter rule.
Well, some do, some don't. There are several billionaire owners in the league.

However, since some do have low budgets they decided that chartered flights would give an unfair advantage to the teams that would spend the money on it. Parity is part of the business model so far.
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  #49  
Old 06-04-2010, 04:11 AM
Neptunian Slug Neptunian Slug is offline
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How do pro sports teams travel around?

Your average minor league team travels commercial and usually in coach. When there was a Philadelphia Phantoms hockey team, my wife and I ended up on the same plane as the team a couple of times.

Quite a shock for the Mrs. to get on a plane and find us surrounded by a bunch of large toothless men. The guys weren't out of hand but you regularly heard the coaches telling guys to "cool it" if they started trending in that direction.
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  #50  
Old 06-04-2010, 07:57 AM
Gagundathar Gagundathar is offline
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The room sharing thing is obviously different for a sports team and I should have thought about that before calling the practice 'nuts'.
Its just the idea of working with one of my techs for 12 hours and then having to share a bedroom with him is very unpleasant to imagine.
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