Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:06 AM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Lots of large predators are prey themselves when young. A baby python or anaconda can easily get snapped up by other larger animals.

And many large whale species have to watch out for packs of orca that can rip them to shreds.
Advertisements  
  #52  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:08 AM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
As noted, surprisingly few mammals are PURE vegetarians. Most herbivores will eat carrion if it's available, and many will pounce on a small bird or lizard for an occasional high protein snack.
  #53  
Old 04-07-2017, 11:27 AM
DudeManBro DudeManBro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 47
Certain gorilla populations are at risk from leopards.
  #54  
Old 04-07-2017, 11:35 AM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,560
Giant tortoise.

Mola Mola.
  #55  
Old 04-07-2017, 12:46 PM
watchwolf49 watchwolf49 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: State of Jefferson
Posts: 7,391
I found the recent video of lions hunting elephants ... unfortunately the lions were hunting calves so this doesn't really fit the OP ... although the elephant that was taken down isn't a calf, nor is it a full grown adult ...

Enjoy -- "Lions attack elephant - Planet Earth - BBC" -- 2006 -- {YouTube 7'35"}

<Snark> Wolverine hunting Godzilla -- {YouTube 4'55"} </Snark>

Last edited by watchwolf49; 04-07-2017 at 12:49 PM.
  #56  
Old 04-07-2017, 01:06 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,071
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
"So, naturalists observe, a flea
Hath smaller fleas that on him prey;
And these have smaller still to bite 'em;
And so proceed ad infinitim

-- Jonathan Swift

(And, yes, fleas have parasites that prey on them.)

------------------
www.sff.net/people/rothman
The version I heard once...

"Bigger fleas have smaller fleas,
Upon their backs to bite'em,
and smaller fleas have lesser fleas,
and so on, ad inifinitum..."
  #57  
Old 04-07-2017, 01:47 PM
Weisshund Weisshund is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 1,601
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehearingaid View Post
I saw a half eaten deer at the beach once, coyotes killed the deer and left part of it the water. We still have some coyotes left in Ma, my state.

Cockroaches don't seem to have any natural enemies , I sure wish they did !
Sure they do
Inside your house? maybe not on a non microscopic level, outside?
Lots of things like to eat them.
  #58  
Old 04-07-2017, 01:57 PM
Weisshund Weisshund is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 1,601
Adult great blue whale?
  #59  
Old 04-07-2017, 02:19 PM
Silver lining Silver lining is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
Not counting humans as enemies, AND assuming the animal is full grown and healthy I can only think of a few.

Gorilla
Elephant
Alligator
Bear (Grizzly or Polar)

I was thinking lions have hyena packs that can kill a full grown lion.

Maybe Hippos, Rhinos and Giraffes?

Any other ideas?
Some Whales. Killer Whale or Sperm are examples.

The Alligator has natural enemies, such as large snakes, and hippos.
  #60  
Old 04-07-2017, 02:42 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 66,962
Saltwater crocodiles and goliath tigerfish appear to have no nonhuman predators.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weisshund View Post
Adult great blue whale?
Orcas will attack even mature blue whales. I don't think a successful attack has been documented, but presumably they wouldn't be trying if they couldn't pull it off once in a while.

ETA: Orcas will attack and kill sperm whales on occasion, too.

Last edited by Really Not All That Bright; 04-07-2017 at 02:45 PM.
  #61  
Old 04-07-2017, 03:29 PM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
Saltwater crocodiles and goliath tigerfish appear to have no nonhuman predators.

Orcas will attack even mature blue whales. I don't think a successful attack has been documented, but presumably they wouldn't be trying if they couldn't pull it off once in a while.

ETA: Orcas will attack and kill sperm whales on occasion, too.
Orcas hunt in large packs, and they tend to go for baleen whales, not toothed whales.

Their target is... the tongue. If a pack of orcas keeps at a humpback whale or any other baleen whales, they may eventually be able to get its mouth open and rip out its big, tasty tongue.

If they get that, they may then swim off and leave the mortally wounded whale to die slowly.

Last edited by astorian; 04-07-2017 at 03:29 PM.
  #62  
Old 04-07-2017, 03:49 PM
cher3 cher3 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Posts: 7,090
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobT View Post
I'm glad to find out that crows have some predators. Unfortunately, suburban Southern California is low on owls and minks.

I guess a really ornery cat could go after a crow, but I think it would be a tough battle.

Who preys on the pigeon?
A barn owl near where we used to live would take a pigeon every couple of weeks or so.
  #63  
Old 04-07-2017, 04:08 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobT View Post
e.

Who preys on the pigeon?
Cats. Hawks. Coyotes.
  #64  
Old 04-07-2017, 04:09 PM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by cher3 View Post
A barn owl near where we used to live would take a pigeon every couple of weeks or so.
Other natural enemies of the pigeon include the pelican and the catfish.
  #65  
Old 04-07-2017, 04:14 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 66,962
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
Orcas hunt in large packs, and they tend to go for baleen whales, not toothed whales.
Sure, but the OP didn't exclude pack hunters. Orcas do also go for toothed whales.
  #66  
Old 04-07-2017, 04:44 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 12,178
Great white sharks - preyed upon by killer whales
Most birds of prey - preyed upon by other birds of prey
Killer whales - I'll accept that one
Crocodiles (technically different from gators) - anacondas and crocs fight it out for dinner rights
Anacondas - crocs (and in Florida, gators)
Wolverines - maybe
Wolves - maybe
Blue whales - packs of orca
Whale sharks - I suspect orca

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobT View Post
Crows and ravens
Birds of prey. Many birds will attack smaller birds. Crows go after blue jays. Hawks go after crows. I suspect eagles take hawks if they can. Also, cats will go after crows.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BobT View Post
I guess a really ornery cat could go after a crow, but I think it would be a tough battle.
Naw, cats are pretty vicious predators. A house can might have a challenge with a raven, but a bobcat/lynx probably wouldn't.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Omniscient View Post
Cattle and Buffalo probably didn't, but what things were like before domestication is beyond me.
North America had several large predators that would take Bison. Cattle were imported, and they are still preyed upon by wolves and pumas.


Quote:
Horses
Horses were imports to North America, and even then they are susceptible to pumas and wolves. There were numerous predators in the Middle East and Europe where they originated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poto View Post
Deer in North America. Only controlled by the CAR. Hunters are less useful in population control. Other than wiping out each other.
Wolves and pumas hunt deer, we just keep their populations low, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Omniscient View Post
Same goes for dolphins and sharks (from what I understand dolphins swim circles around a shark and will humble it quite easily),
Solitary dolphins are at risk from sharks, but they tend to group up, and a pod of dolphins will chase/kill a shark. Not necessarily to eat, just for protection.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovetheoutdoors View Post
Predators= True carnivores, Prey= Herbivores, Omnivorous animals
Your definition is faulty. Carnivores eat meat. Omnivores eat meat and plants. Many omnivores hunt prey. Predator just means they hunt for food. Predator =/= carnivore.

Quote:
Actually, cats don't have natural predators. There are no animals that seek out or prey on cats. Cats are strict carnivores, coyotes are not obligate carnivores. If their paths cross, they will probably fight and kill eachother.
Just because coyotes can eat plants doesn't mean they don't prey on cats. Also, big birds of prey will kill a cat if they can. I personally met a golden eagle that was in lockup because it habitually preyed on small pets.
  #67  
Old 04-07-2017, 05:05 PM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 7,115
An animal that is not preyed on as a healthy adult in the wild is known as an apex predator. Wikipedia has a list of them.
  #68  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:03 PM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Torrance Ca
Posts: 7,075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
An animal that is not preyed on as a healthy adult in the wild is known as an apex predator. Wikipedia has a list of them.
This list has many animals listed that are routinely preyed upon by larger predators as a food source. I counted at least 10 just at a glance.
  #69  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:16 PM
RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 8,586
Quote:
Originally Posted by nearwildheaven View Post
Do 18-year-old zombies have any natural predators?

Not as long as you buy brains for it.

The Dodo bird had no natural predators on its island it was confined to, which is how it ended up not being very bright about them, and easy pickings for humans when discovered. And soon made extinct. If not for humans, the Dodo would likely still be there, on its island.
  #70  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:26 PM
astro astro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Taint of creation
Posts: 33,151
Orca tearing apart a great white shark
  #71  
Old 04-07-2017, 07:35 PM
Tamerlane Tamerlane is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: SF Bay Area, California
Posts: 12,632
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
This list has many animals listed that are routinely preyed upon by larger predators as a food source. I counted at least 10 just at a glance.
Yeah, that is actually a very bad list relative to the OP. All kinds of critters prey on rattlesnakes for instance. Great Horned Owls alone rule out quite a few predators. They're the king of generalists in North America, with over 500 identified prey species. They'll hunt and eat anything that flies, walks, runs, crawls, hops, glides or swims in the right size range, which is very wide. Including most raptors, ravens, and many small to mid-sized mammalian predators like virtually all the mustelids - i.e. that list mentions the Striped Skunk as an apex predator, the remains of 57 of which were found in one owl's nest .

Last edited by Tamerlane; 04-07-2017 at 07:36 PM.
  #72  
Old 04-07-2017, 11:05 PM
Qwakkeddup Qwakkeddup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Iowa
Posts: 587
I have seen mention of Cows with guns, anybody for the Chickens in Choppers??

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQMbXvn2RNI
  #73  
Old 04-07-2017, 11:47 PM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Most predators are opportunists, and hardly any will rule out attacking all members of any species.

Even if (random example), say, a cheetah is highly unlikely to attack a baboon, well, you never say never. If a cheetah is REALLY hungry, is much bigger than the baboon, and thinks it has surprise on its side... MAYBE it will take a shot.
  #74  
Old 04-08-2017, 01:07 AM
coremelt coremelt is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 5,642
Komodo Dragons. They're the biggest thing in their eco system. Nothing preys on them.

In Australia Quoll and Tasmanian Devil's used to have nothing that preyed on them, now introduced feral cats and foxes will sometimes attack them. Edit: Scratch that, Wedge Tail Eagles have been known to attack Quoll and Tassie devils, they are really the Apex Predator in Australia so I guess I'd add Wedge Tail Eagles to the list.

Last edited by coremelt; 04-08-2017 at 01:08 AM.
  #75  
Old 04-08-2017, 01:49 AM
cochrane cochrane is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: The Nekkid Pueblo
Posts: 18,644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver lining View Post
Some Whales. Killer Whale or Sperm are examples.

The Alligator has natural enemies, such as large snakes, and hippos.
Nitpick: Alligators don't share a habitat with hippos. They only live in the USA and in China. In fact, once an alligator reaches four feet in length, it is relatively safe from being preyed on by other species, although it may be eaten by a larger alligator.

And the only large snake an alligator might encounter in the wild would be a Burmese python, an invasive species in the Everglades.
  #76  
Old 04-08-2017, 06:49 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 16,506
Ironically enough, sloths have very few predators despite having precious few natural defenses and no inclination to use them (nevermind the energy to). They don't move and fade into the background, so they rarely get noticed. They're covered in moss and garbage and their meat tastes awful, so predators who *do* notice learn to stop real quick.
The only time they really get attacked with any frequency is when they try and get off their lazy arse and forage around on the ground, at which time leopards and humans take notice.
Which just goes to show : don't make the effort. It's bad for you.

Last edited by Kobal2; 04-08-2017 at 06:49 AM.
  #77  
Old 04-08-2017, 07:47 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by astro View Post
But I'm guessing that some times the fight goes the other way.
  #78  
Old 04-08-2017, 07:54 AM
Darren Garrison Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 4,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kobal2 View Post
Ironically enough, sloths have very few predators despite having precious few natural defenses and no inclination to use them
{Schwarzenegger voice]It's not a puma!{/Schwarzenegger voice]

Oh, wait, it is a puma.
  #79  
Old 04-08-2017, 08:52 AM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Torrance Ca
Posts: 7,075
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
Most predators are opportunists, and hardly any will rule out attacking all members of any species.

Even if (random example), say, a cheetah is highly unlikely to attack a baboon, well, you never say never. If a cheetah is REALLY hungry, is much bigger than the baboon, and thinks it has surprise on its side... MAYBE it will take a shot.
A leopard will kill a baboon but I doubt a cheetah would take on anything but a baby. Baboons have bigger teeth than cheetah and can fight.
  #80  
Old 04-08-2017, 09:12 AM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
A leopard will kill a baboon but I doubt a cheetah would take on anything but a baby. Baboons have bigger teeth than cheetah and can fight.
You're absolutely right- 999 times out of 1000, a cheetah isn't going to mess with a baboon. Certainly not if there are easier pickings (a nice Thomson's gazelle maybe) around. Baboons are tough and they travel in big groups, which means Most predators (even lions or hyenas) generally steer clear of them- rightly!

I'm just saying we should hardly ever state categorically "Animal X is safe from all predators." It really depends- how hungry is the predator? How desperate? How close in size are predator and prey? Even if a predator would prefer easier pickings, might he try to eat me if he was famished and I happened to stumble into him?
  #81  
Old 04-08-2017, 09:52 AM
StarvingButStrong StarvingButStrong is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,298
I don't know about humans being "apex predators." I get viciously preyed upon about eight months of the year in my own yard if I'm stupid enough to go out at dusk or dawn.
  #82  
Old 04-08-2017, 10:29 AM
GusNSpot GusNSpot is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: N/W Arkansas
Posts: 8,097
One on one & without mechanical help, we are a long way from the top.
  #83  
Old 04-08-2017, 10:41 AM
40below 40below is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 32
Not a biologist, but I am a gardener so I wasn't thinking large fauna, I was thinking about everything in nature that makes itself either taste bad or smell bad so entire classes of animals not only don't eat it but actively avoid it and whose only natural enemy is me.
  #84  
Old 04-12-2017, 04:53 PM
Thaliana Thaliana is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 2
Giraffes (yes, even adults) can be prey to lions and hyenas. They are definitely exempt from the no natural enemies statement.

http://www.giraffeworlds.com/giraffe-predators/

Not to say it's EASY for a lion or hyena to take down a giraffe, it does happen, the lions just prefer easier, slower food first.
  #85  
Old 04-13-2017, 11:03 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 12,178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
But I'm guessing that some times the fight goes the other way.
You're presuming there's a fight. The orcas have a hunting technique for sharks. You grab them and then flip them on their backs. Many sharks and rays, when flipped over, go into a catatonic state. White sharks are not exempt.

Plus, full-grown orcas are larger than the largest Whites. Like 2 to 3 times the mass. Smart fighters that are bigger than you make poor prey.

It should also be telling, as they stated in that video, that when that orca ate that white shark, all the other white sharks for miles left the area and abandoned the seals - a season's worth of eating and they skipped out. None hung around to fight off the orcas - they all headed for the hills.

Given that bottlenose dolphins will attack and drive off white sharks, I'm thinking an orca/shark battle is pretty one-sided.
  #86  
Old 04-13-2017, 11:31 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 36,905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kobal2 View Post
Ironically enough, sloths have very few predators despite having precious few natural defenses and no inclination to use them (nevermind the energy to).
Harpy Eagles take a lot of sloths. Along with monkeys and opossums they are their principle prey

Quote:
The only time they really get attacked with any frequency is when they try and get off their lazy arse and forage around on the ground, at which time leopards and humans take notice.
Sloths and leopards don't occur together. Ocelots and sometimes jaguars take a lot of sloths when they come to the ground once a week to defecate (they don't forage on the ground).
  #87  
Old 04-14-2017, 05:10 AM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thaliana View Post
Giraffes (yes, even adults) can be prey to lions and hyenas. They are definitely exempt from the no natural enemies statement.

http://www.giraffeworlds.com/giraffe-predators/

Not to say it's EASY for a lion or hyena to take down a giraffe, it does happen, the lions just prefer easier, slower food first.
Again, a lion pride would RATHER go after a zebra or a gnu.

But if they're REALLY hungry, and they spot an oblivious giraffe munching on acacia leaves? Of COURSE they'll give it a go. Can't be too choosy.

Very few predators ever think, "Gee, maybe I could kill and eat that unfamiliar animal, but... nah, he's not in my list of natural prey." To most predators, a meal is a meal.

Last edited by astorian; 04-14-2017 at 05:13 AM.
  #88  
Old 04-14-2017, 05:54 AM
Filbert Filbert is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 3,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by pluto View Post
Since I have already been on a New Zealand thread this morning ...

Prior to the introduction of pigs, rats, cats, dogs, etc. by humans (starting about A.D. 1000) the birds of New Zealand (the dominant fauna) had no natural enemies, at least in the sense of predators. The only mammals on the islands were bats and pinnipeds. None of the birds were carnivorous, so although they competed with each other for ecological niches they didn't eat each other.

Two things resulted from this -- 1) a lot of flightless bird species developed, and 2) the native fauna were easy picking for the introduced predators. IIRC, in the Chatham Islands (near NZ) the lighthouse keeper's cat was personally responsible for the extinction of a number of species of small birds.


------------------
"non sunt multiplicanda entia praeter necessitatem"
-- William of Ockham

I realise this is post is almost old enough to drink alcohol in my country, but I can't help pointing out it's not true: New Zealand does not have any native mammals bar bats and aquatics, but it has a native falcon, the unimaginatively named New Zealand Falcon, and it used to be home to the largest eagle ever known to exist, the Haast's Eagle, which could take down even the biggest of the moas, judging by skeleton records.

Oh, and I think the post has mixed up the (not extinct, but it got damn close) Chatham Island Black Robin, and the flightless, and supposedly wiped out by the lighthouse keeper's cat Stephen Island Wren, which was probably actually wiped out from it's last refuge on Stephen Island by feral cats and specimen collectors, after previously being eradicated from the mainland due to having no defence against mammalian predators.
  #89  
Old 04-16-2017, 01:34 AM
MrDibble MrDibble is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Cape Town, South Africa &
Posts: 21,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehearingaid View Post
Cockroaches don't seem to have any natural enemies
Sure they do. Terrifying mind-controlling ones.
  #90  
Old 04-16-2017, 01:58 PM
Guest-starring: Id! Guest-starring: Id! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 2,069
AFAIK there isn't anything out to kill the great wild Gary Busey.
Except maybe paparazzi.

Can't remember the poster's name.........I was hoping he was still around to let him know that I'm pretty sure a tiger can eat a lion.
Whole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StarvingButStrong View Post
I don't know about humans being "apex predators." I get viciously preyed upon about eight months of the year in my own yard if I'm stupid enough to go out at dusk or dawn.
This applies to me if you're talking about flibbertyjibbin mosquitoes.
  #91  
Old 04-16-2017, 09:30 PM
Irishman Irishman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Houston, TX, USA
Posts: 12,178
Feeding from you isn't quite the same as eating you. Something about how dead you are at the end of the process.

I realize certain ants might blur the distinction.
  #92  
Old 04-16-2017, 10:22 PM
Guest-starring: Id! Guest-starring: Id! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 2,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishman View Post
Feeding from you isn't quite the same as eating you.
What if I croak from dengue? I might not be getting maowed down on, but the natural enemy is still taking me down.

Not to mention - that world famous Aussie mosquito hunter's maxim: "There's nothing more dangerous than a wounded mosquito".

Also - good "G.I." band.
  #93  
Old 04-17-2017, 06:34 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 16,506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren Garrison View Post
{Schwarzenegger voice]It's not a puma!{/Schwarzenegger voice]

Oh, wait, it is a puma.
Gotta love that dangling bite move. I know he's trying to tire the sloth out, but it's like "OK, that's enough effort for today, you lost so just...become dinner now, fucker, OK ?"
  #94  
Old 04-17-2017, 12:39 PM
wombattver wombattver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 186
Kangaroos?
(I don't think they've been mentioned yet)
  #95  
Old 04-17-2017, 05:15 PM
gytalf2000 gytalf2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Posts: 2,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by wombattver View Post
Kangaroos?
(I don't think they've been mentioned yet)
I'm pretty sure that dingoes prey on kangaroos.
  #96  
Old 04-17-2017, 05:49 PM
StarvingButStrong StarvingButStrong is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,298
I know that *something* does because of those Nature shows that always mention how the mama Kangaroo will dump the baby out of the pouch if she has to when being pursued.
  #97  
Old 04-18-2017, 07:39 AM
gytalf2000 gytalf2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Posts: 2,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarvingButStrong View Post
I know that *something* does because of those Nature shows that always mention how the mama Kangaroo will dump the baby out of the pouch if she has to when being pursued.
Oh, and I figure that if the kangaroos linger at the water's edge, they risk gettin' chomped by crocs, as well. Also, in days past, they had to worry about thylacines.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thylacine
  #98  
Old 04-18-2017, 12:02 PM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Dingoes have been in Australia so long, people forget they aren't "natural" predators of the kangaroo, because they aren't native to Australia.
  #99  
Old 04-18-2017, 12:07 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,560
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
Dingoes have been in Australia so long, people forget they aren't "natural" predators of the kangaroo, because they aren't native to Australia.
Well, at a certain point in time, you have to accept them as "native". I mean, many species have arrived by colonization. Dingos may have arrived 12000 years ago.
  #100  
Old 04-18-2017, 02:50 PM
astorian astorian is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 34,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
Well, at a certain point in time, you have to accept them as "native". I mean, many species have arrived by colonization. Dingos may have arrived 12000 years ago.
Oh sure, at SOME point, you accept animals as native even if they were introduced later than their neighbors.

Point is, the dingoes' prey DIDN'T have any natural enemies 13,000 years ago. But by now, no one remembers when that was true.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017