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Old 09-09-2010, 07:21 PM
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Need book recommendations! Light-hearted fantasy or historical fiction?


Thread title's about the gist of it. I'm running out of ideas from my local library and I'd love to get into some new series.

In sci-fi/fantasy territory: I've read and really enjoyed, so far, the books from Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Susanna Clarke, Jasper Fforde, Christopher Moore, and David Eddings. I loved the Vorkosigan saga by Lois McMaster Bujold and I thought The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Heinlein was okay (Stranger in a Strange Land wasn't my cup of tea). I finished A Game of Thrones but haven't picked up the second one yet; right now I'm just getting into the Temeraire series by Naomi Novik (so good!).

As for historical fiction, I read through the entire Master and Commander series by Patrick O'Brian and really like both Pillars Of The Earth and World Without End by Ken Follett. I love anything set in medieval or renaissance England, but I'm not picky.

Any thoughts?
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:24 PM
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Try the fantasy works of Chris Bunch and Alan Cole ("The Far Kingdoms"). Or Tom Holt.

Last edited by silenus; 09-09-2010 at 07:27 PM.
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:28 PM
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Perhaps Fantastic Historical Fiction? The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson or Mr Norrel and Johnathon Strange by Susanna Clarke would probably qualify and are amongst my favorite books. They're light in the sense of being fairly playful and fun (though not in the sense of being easy to carry around, The Baroque Cycle probably runs north of 5,000 pages.)

Last edited by Simplicio; 09-09-2010 at 07:30 PM.
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:52 PM
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"Age of Unreason" series by J. Gregory Keyes. Its an alternate history/fantasy with Benjamin Franklin as our sexy young action hero.

The first book is called Newton's Cannon
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:00 PM
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Anything by Tamora Pierce.

OK, most of it is found on the Young Adult shelves of your local library. And so the heroines (and heros) are often teens and sometimes younger. But it's short and fun and I'm thoroughly enjoying it.

Most of her books are set in more or less the Middle Ages, just with Magic. Many of her books are written in Quartets, and a whole Quartet is more or less equivalent to one Adult book.

In fact, I'm told, her first quartet (the story of Alanna) started out as one adult book and when she was told it would be more likely to be published as YA lit ( which has more stringent length limitations), she divided the book in four and got them published as a quartet.
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Old 09-09-2010, 08:11 PM
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I love anything set in medieval or renaissance England, ...

Any thoughts?
I hesitate, he's been out of fashion for a long time, but Thomas Costain wrote some very enjoyable historical novels in the 50s and 60s. And some decent history, if you remain aware that he was not a historian, and have grains of salt handy. He was a very Anglocentric Canadian author.

Below the Salt and The Black Rose are my favorites. I also enjoyed both volumes of The Tontine; it's set more at the dawn of the industrial age in Britain. The Silver Chalice is good also, if you can set aside the religion, and especially if you're lucky enough to check out the original version from the library, and not the version edited to add more religion.
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Old 09-09-2010, 09:41 PM
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for historical fiction, try Georgette Heyer's Regency romances - she pretty much invented that genre; good light reads; excellent dialogue.

going further back, there's the Brother Cadfael series of historical mysteries, set in mid 12th century Shrewsbury and environs; written by Ellis Peters; very much in the "English cozy murder" tradition.

Another historical mystery series, set about 30 years later, is the Queen's Man series by Sharon Kay Penman; a bit more gritty.

If you like the O'Brien series, you may find the Hornblower series by Forester, and the Ramage series by Pope of interest. I find the Hornblower series the best of the lot; Pope's plots are interesting, but his dialogue is a bit stilted and his narrative can be a bit repetitive, as he over-uses similar phrases.

And of course, depending how recently you define "historical fiction" there's always P.G. Wodehouse, whose stories are essentially set between 1910 and 1940, regardless of the actual publication date.

This sort of inquiry often brings out people recommending the Flashman series by George MacDonald Fraser; personally I don't like that series at all, but it's just a question of taste. (I just don't find the concept of a villain as hero that interesting or amusing.) You might find them worth a try.

ETA: meant to say that I agree with Frank's comments and qualifications on Costain.

Also, a lot of historical fiction in English is written from the English perspective. You might find Nigel Tranter's series of historical novels, set in Scotland, to be interesting; written from the Scots perspective.

Last edited by Northern Piper; 09-09-2010 at 09:44 PM. Reason: thought of more things to say
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Old 09-09-2010, 11:25 PM
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Some possibilities for light-hearted fantasy:

James P. Blaylock--The Elfin Ship and its sequels. Also the "Langdon St. Ives" books (this is steampunk).
Ernest Bramah--The "Kai Lung" books.
James Branch Cabell--Jurgen, Figures of Earth, and The Silver Stallion. These are all part of the "Biography of Dom Manuel of Poictesme" collection.
L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt--The "Enchanter" stories.
Arthur Conan Doyle--The Lost World
Lord Dunsany--The King of Elfland's Daughter as well as any of his early short stories. Also the "Jorkens" stories.
Robert E. Howard--A Gent From Bear Creek or The Riot at Bucksnort (They're the same thing; Gent is just a fix-up novelization where Riot is the anthology)
L. Ron Hubbard (yes, really)--Slaves of Sleep or Typewriter in the Sky
Keith Laumer--The Time Bender and The World Shuffler. There are two more in the series, but skip them.
Fritz Leiber--The "Fafhrd & Grey Mouser" stories.
A. Merritt--The Face in the Abyss, The Moon Pool, or The Metal Monster
Martin Millar--Anything he's written. Urban fantasy for the counterculture.
Martin Scott--...is Martin Millar doing by-the-numbers schlocky fantasy noir. It's fine if you're into that sort of thing.
Michael Shea--The "Nifft" stories.
Thorne Smith--Topper; Topper Takes a Trip; The Stray Lamb; The Night Life of the Gods
Jack Vance--The "Dying Earth" stories.


And if you haven't read Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome, you owe it to yourself to do so. It's a travelogue with the boring bits edited out.
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Old 09-10-2010, 12:19 AM
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The Drawing of the Dark, by Tim Powers was the first book that came to my mind. It is a sort of historical fantasy adventure, set in 16th century Vienna. Very entertaining, I couldn't help but read it one sitting.

Also, for light hearted fantasy, I can recommend most of James Blaylock's books.
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Old 09-10-2010, 02:22 AM
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I'm working on something! Be about a year though.

To tide you over, I heartily second Fritz Leiber's "Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser" books.

I think the Game of Thrones has collapsed in it's own epicness.
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Old 09-10-2010, 05:33 AM
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If you like the Patrick O'Brien books, you might as well go back and read the original Horatio Hornblower books by CS Forester. Or the Sharpe books by Bernard Cornwell, or better yet the Flashman books by George McDonald Frasier.
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Old 09-10-2010, 05:36 AM
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If you don't mind GN's, The Desert Peach follows the adventures of Erwin Rommel's flamboyant younger brother, Pfirsich, and his misfit soldiers in North Africa during WWII.
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Old 09-10-2010, 06:58 AM
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If you liked Patrick O'Brian's naval stories, I'd strongly recommend C.S. Forester's fiction, especially his Horatio Hornblower novels. Most of his stuff is out of print, sad to say (and he wrote quite a bit of other stuff, both naval and otherwise, including The African Queen), but I know the Hornblower novels still are.


Have you read all of Chris Moore's books? Because he has a couple of new ones out.


A lot of great fantasy and SF is out of print, but you might find reprints or used copies of these:


Robots Have no Tails and other stories by "Lewis Padgett", which is a pseudonym used by the husband-and-wife team of Henry Kuttner and Catherine l. Moore. They both wrote quite a bit besides, both together and apart. But the stories in this series are funny


Anything by Robert Sheckley. He was a BIG influence on Douglas Adams (I swear he ripped off Sheckley's Dimension of Miracles for his Hitchiker's Guide, although Adams claimed he wrote his book before he read DoM) and others (if King didn't get a lot of ideas for Running Man from The Prize of Peril, a lot of people are mistaken). Most of the movie Total Recall feels ripped off from Sheckley's The Status Civilixzation. Shecklery's work has been nominally filmed many times, but so completely changed that you'd never recognize it. And nobody seems to get his irony and wit. Look up especially his short stories from the fifties, which appeared in a number of anthologies.


Also good, witty short stories fro the fifties -- Fredric Brown. And not only his short stories, but novels like Martian, Go Home, What Mad Universe, and others. The guy wrote Science Fiction, Fantasy, and straight Mysteries with equal facility and wit. I don't know of anything in print currently, but his stuff is definitely worth digging up.
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:10 AM
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Light fantasy? A. Lee Martinez is your man. Standouts are Gil's All-Fright Diner (about redneck vampires and werewolves), A Nameless Witch (less funny, but still light) and Monster (superb).
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Old 09-10-2010, 09:34 AM
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Simon R Green's Blue Moon Rising, Blood and Honour, and Beyond the Blue Moon are all enjoyable reads.

Very light - but fun - reading are the Thraxas books.

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Old 09-10-2010, 10:45 AM
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For historical fiction you could try Dorothy Dunnett's Lymond and Niccolo series. Set across Europe in the 16th and 15th centuries respectively. Not everyone's cup of tea but if you get into them very addictive. High politics, romance, action, good history and very high quality writing. (Do read the Lymond books first. Although later historically they were written first and best to stick to the order of writing.)

On an entirely different note, how about James Clavell's Asian saga, Tai Pan, Shogun, and Noble House? (The series contiues with Whirlwind and Gai-Jin but I don't recomend them so much.) Just about the opposite of Dorothy Dunnett, the writing is iffy (not Dan Brown bad but not literary) and the history is, well, shakey but great page turners. Shogun and Noble House are each over a thousand pages but hold the interest throughout.

Tai Pan covers the founding of Hong Kong as a British colony in the 1840s, Shogun is set in feudal Japan at the begining of the 17th century, and Noble House picks up the story of the Hong Kong in the early 1960s. Each self contained but links between them, particularly Tai Pan and Noble House.
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:57 AM
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For light fantasy, I can recommend John C. Hines, especially The Stepsister Scheme and sequels--Cinderella, Snow White, and Sleeping Beauty as kick-ass action heroines.

John Moore is also good, though fairly forgettable.
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:01 AM
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Thank you, everyone, I really appreciate this! I owe you all snogs and brownies

I've read a lot of P.G. Wodehouse and loved it, and I thought Three Men in a Boat was hilarious. The new Flavia de Luce series (The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie and The Weed That Strings The Hangman's Bag) has the same sort of tone, and it's too fabulous for words.

How about historical fiction-mystery mashups? Any thoughts?

Last edited by Kythereia; 09-10-2010 at 11:01 AM. Reason: I can do HTML tags good
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:51 AM
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Thank you, everyone, I really appreciate this! I owe you all snogs and brownies

I've read a lot of P.G. Wodehouse and loved it, and I thought Three Men in a Boat was hilarious. The new Flavia de Luce series (The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie and The Weed That Strings The Hangman's Bag) has the same sort of tone, and it's too fabulous for words.

How about historical fiction-mystery mashups? Any thoughts?
Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog is almost a homage to Three Men. Mystery, time travel & a touch of romance.
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Old 09-10-2010, 11:52 AM
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Light fantasy: Tanya Huff's Summon the Keeper. I'm currently rereading it. There are sequels but I haven't read them yet.

Fantasy/history blend: The Sarantium Mosaic, by Guy Gavriel Kay. Set in an alternate Byzantium. I really enjoyed it, though I didn't care at all for the Follett book, so take this recommendation with a grain of salt.

The Matthew Shardlake historical mystery series set during the reign of Henry VIII is outstanding. Starts with Dissolution.

I also love the Joliffe books by Margaret Frazer, which are mysteries set in medieval England around an acting troupe, but they are fairly slow for some tastes. They start with A Play of Isaac, though later books are stronger.
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Old 09-10-2010, 01:06 PM
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John Varley writes in a style inspired by Heinlein while leaving out Heinlein's tendency to preach. Check out his Mars books: Red Thunder, Red Lightning, and Rolling Thunder.

S.M. Stirling writes books that cross over between science fiction and historical fiction. Start out with his solo novels like Conquistador or The Peshawar Lancers. Then if you like him, you can try Lords of Creation - The Sky People and In the Courts of the Crimson Kings - or the Nantucket trilogy - Island in the Sea of Time, Against the Tide of Years, and On the Oceans of Eternity. Then if you get ambitious you can start the Emberverse series, which is currently up to seven books (and is going to nine).
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Old 09-10-2010, 01:09 PM
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Love Raymond Feist - his Midkemia books are awesome. Faerie Tale is also a good one.
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Old 09-10-2010, 01:29 PM
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Roma for historical fiction:

Quote:
sprawling novel tracing Rome's extraordinary development over five centuries, as seen through the eyes of succeeding generations of one of its founding families. Skipping over several generations at a time, Saylor puts the Potitii family descendants at the side of Romulus and Remus at the official founding of the city; of Scipio Africanus during the Punic Wars; of the legendary reformers Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus during the turbulent second-century B.C.; and of Julius and Augustus Caesar as the Republic ebbs into Empire. Solidly anchored in fact and vividly imagined, this long book moves at a sprightly clip and features some vibrant personages
http://www.amazon.com/Roma-Novel-Anc.../dp/0312328311

Great read - I flew through it when I was backpacking through Greece, reading while riding on trains and ferries, lying the beach, and lounging around town; it's tough to put down, telling a great story, developing characters well, building attachment to the families, and dragging you through Roman history. Good times.
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Old 09-10-2010, 01:32 PM
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I like Saylor's mysteries, too, though I can't read too many one right after another.
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Old 09-10-2010, 02:51 PM
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I'm re-reading the classic Treasure Island, and really enjoying it.
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Old 09-10-2010, 05:12 PM
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Sinceyou liked the VorKosigan series, go for her 2 fantasy series, Wide Green World series and Chalion/Five Gods series.

Hm, Lindsay Davis has a mystery series set in Rome, Marcus Didius Falco is a good read.

David Drake and Eric Flint have a fantasy/sfional series set in 500 ad Byzantium that is an interesting alternate universe sort of deal.
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Old 09-10-2010, 07:40 PM
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just thought of a fun historical fantasy: Poul Anderson's A Midsummer Night's Tempest - the premise is an alternative time-line where every word Shakespeare wrote is historically accurate, meaning, for example, that 17th century technology is a bit further along than in our timeline. It's set in the English Civil War, with Prince Rupert as as the protagonist. Puck and Ariel both put in appearances, since they are real personages.

Last edited by Northern Piper; 09-10-2010 at 07:44 PM. Reason: thought of more to say.
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Old 09-10-2010, 08:38 PM
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I second Lord Dunsany and the Sharpe novels.

Ellis K. Meacham wrote three novels concerning an East India Company naval commander. They had warships! Cool!

Sylvia Townsend Warner wrote Kingdoms of Elfin, Lolly Willowes, and other very good fantasies.
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Old 09-10-2010, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Kythereia View Post
I love anything set in medieval or renaissance England, ...

Any thoughts?
I hesitate, he's been out of fashion for a long time, but Thomas Costain wrote some very enjoyable historical novels in the 50s and 60s. And some decent history, if you remain aware that he was not a historian, and have grains of salt handy. He was a very Anglocentric Canadian author..
Actually his actual Histories (THE CONQUERING FAMILY, THE MAGNIFICENT CENTURY, THE THREE EDWARDS and THE LAST PLANTAGENETS) are better. 4 books in the series.

There's also the "Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Althelstan" Paul Doherty
http://www.amazon.com/Shadows-Sorrow...=3RHE4WIT5VV04

I also suggest the SPQR mystery series by John Maddox Roberts.
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:19 PM
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...How about historical fiction-mystery mashups? Any thoughts?
Robert Harris's Fatherland is an alt-history murder mystery set in 1964 Berlin. The Nazis won World War II, President Joseph Kennedy is coming for a summit meeting with Hitler, and an SS criminal investigator is trying to figure out why several senior Nazi bigwigs have met premature deaths. Very, very good stuff.

Nicholas Meyer's The Seven Percent Solution posits that Sherlock Holmes got treatment for his cocaine addiction from Dr. Sigmund Freud. A wonderful, fun book.

For a straight historical novel, you can't beat Gary Jennings's Aztec, which is an epic, compellingly readable account of the last days of the Aztec Empire, told through the eyes of a peasant who rises to the uppermost levels of society just as the Spaniards show up. I reread this every eight years or so, and it just keeps getting better.
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:40 PM
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Robert Harris's Fatherland is an alt-history murder mystery set in 1964 Berlin. The Nazis won World War II, President Joseph Kennedy is coming for a summit meeting with Hitler, and an SS criminal investigator is trying to figure out why several senior Nazi bigwigs have met premature deaths. Very, very good stuff.
If you liked Fatherland you should check out Resurrection Day by Brendan DuBois. A very similar feel - a mystery in an alternate history setting with some government conspiracy thriller thrown in. But the setting here is the United States ten years after the Cuban missile crisis led to a limited nuclear war. Well written.
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:29 AM
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I keep forgetting to mention Guy Gavriel Kay, who definitely deserves it. Avoid his Fionavir Tapestry, which I didn't like, but I love the rest of his stuff. It's all set in a world very similar to ours, with a few minor changes, including some fantasy elements, like some mild magic. Each book is based on an alternate version of a medieval European country. There's an analogue of Spain, Italy, England, etc. But that description doesn't do it justice. His stuff is very literary, almost poetic. My personal favorites are Sailing to Sarantium and its sequel, Lord of Emperors, based on the Byzantine Empire.
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:38 AM
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... If you liked Fatherland you should check out Resurrection Day by Brendan DuBois. A very similar feel - a mystery in an alternate history setting with some government conspiracy thriller thrown in. But the setting here is the United States ten years after the Cuban missile crisis led to a limited nuclear war. Well written.
I think you and I already discussed this on another alt-hist thread. I was actually very disappointed in Resurrection Day. I've long been interested in JFK and have read a lot about the Cuban Missile Crisis, but I thought the author fell well short of the mark - cardboard characters and an implausible plot. Fatherland is, IMHO, far superior (although of course it's comparing apples and oranges).
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Old 09-11-2010, 12:26 PM
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Piers Anthony - Xanth series. If puns annoy you, don't bother.
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Old 09-11-2010, 02:59 PM
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I've really gotten into Bernard Cornwell's books--especially the series beginning with the Last Kingdom (10th century England) and the Grail Quest series (sounds fanatsy-ish, but its not) (100 years war). Angincourt is also very good, and its being made into a movie next year. If they stay true to the book, it will be awesome.
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Old 09-11-2010, 07:22 PM
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My personal favorites are Sailing to Sarantium and its sequel, Lord of Emperors, based on the Byzantine Empire.
I thought these were brilliant. I read them just a couple of months ago.
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:33 PM
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I heartily recommend the Ethshar series by Lawrence Watt-Evans starting with The Misenchanted Sword.

Last edited by lee; 09-11-2010 at 08:33 PM.
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Old 09-11-2010, 09:21 PM
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I recommend longtime YA fantasy writer Dianna Wynne Jones. Standouts are Howl's Moving Castle (the movie was loosely based on her novel), and its sequel, Castle in the Air; the Chrestomanci series; and standalones Dogsbody and Deep Secret. I also recommend Barry Hugart's Bridge of Birds: A Novel of Ancient China that never was. I read a fair amount of fantasy in my teens and a lot of it was mediocre and stale (it was easy to avoid from the really awful stuff) but these works are fresh and often humorous and are still fun to reread.
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Old 09-11-2010, 09:35 PM
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I also recommend Barry Hugart's Bridge of Birds: A Novel of Ancient China that never was.
Yes!
The gunpowder helicopter!
Woof!
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:05 PM
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Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog is almost a homage to Three Men. Mystery, time travel & a touch of romance.
And extremely light-hearted. Very humorous. Very worth reading. And if you read Doomsday Book (time travel to the plague in an English town, while a simultaneous plague takes place where she came from) first, you'll be in desperate need of light-hearted. (As I suspect Willis was after she wrote it.)
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:32 PM
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I never see John Morressey's Kedrigern books in these threads. Starting with A Voice for Princess, they follow the adventures of Kedrigern of Silent Thunder Mountain, a semi-retired wizard who specializes in counterspells, and his efforts to disenchant a princess who's been turned into a frog (which he does promptly, but with unexpected side effects that persist in various permutations through several books).

The series overturns a host of light-fantasy tropes, starting with the way wizards are supposed to look. I LOVE these books, and return to them every couple of years.

I'm missing a copy of Kedrigern in Wanderland; if anyone has a copy, I'll buy it off you.

Last edited by Chef Troy; 09-11-2010 at 10:35 PM. Reason: add information
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Old 09-12-2010, 01:39 AM
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I recommend longtime YA fantasy writer Dianna Wynne Jones. Standouts are Howl's Moving Castle (the movie was loosely based on her novel), and its sequel, Castle in the Air; the Chrestomanci series; and standalones Dogsbody and Deep Secret.
There's another book in the Howl series, House of Many Ways. Howl and his family are not the main focus, but they have strong supporting roles. Jones also wrote the Dalemark quartet. I found the first one, Cart and Cwidder, to be rather boring, but other people liked it very much. The quartet are available as single novels and as two double novels. You don't have to read them in order, or even read all of them, they are basically stand alone novels set at different times in a common setting. Jones has written a lot of stand alone novels, and most of them are considered YA, but don't let that stop you from reading them.

I'll just second most of Lawrence Watt-Evans' works, especially the Esthar novels, but avoid the books in the Annals of the Chosen series. Most of the Esthar stories can be read in any order. Sometimes he references earlier works, but for the most part there are no spoilers to worry about. Really, pick up The Misenchanted Sword and see if you fall in love with it.

You might like the Dream Park series by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes. While these aren't really terribly light hearted, they're good adventure reads, as well as being mysteries in a SF setting. Basically, the world has holo technology to a point where Live Action Roleplaying Games can be acted out in a park, and players will actually appear to be casting spells and performing various heroic acts. Most people will game at home, but a lucky few will play the game first in Dream Park. I especially enjoyed learning about the Cargo Cult in the third book, The California Voodoo Game. You do need to read these in order, though.

Stranger in a Strange Land was really social commentary in SF trappings. Well, most SF is social commentary of one sort or another, but Heinlein was more vocal about it. And our society has moved on from most of what Heinlein was commenting on. I enjoyed it when I first read it, and I still enjoy it, but parts of it make me wince.
  #43  
Old 09-13-2010, 06:48 PM
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Connie Willis's To Say Nothing of the Dog is almost a homage to Three Men. Mystery, time travel & a touch of romance.
I'm reading this right at the moment, and it's a wonderful fantasy/ historical / alternate history blend; Victorian aesthetics, a comedy of manners, and the perils of time travel.

Tim Powers has already been mentioned for the The Drawing of the Dark, but several of his other works would also fit the OP request:The Anubis Gates, On Stranger Tides, and The Stress of Her Regard in particular.
  #44  
Old 04-22-2011, 01:30 AM
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Ken Follett


I finally read "The Pillars of the Earth" and I thought it was one of the best books I've ever read and I really didn't want it to end. I decided to try out "World Without End" not knowing that it was sort of a sequel/prequel to it. I was so excited when it came in and I read the intro! I'm about halfway through it now and I highly recommend any avid reader to try them out. I think that anyone could enjoy either of them.
After this I suppose I'll try another one of his books...why not right?
  #45  
Old 04-22-2011, 02:29 AM
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Sharon Penman
The Sunne in Splendour about Richard III of England

The Wales trilogy, Here Be Dragons, Falls The Shadow and The Reckoning
The Henry and Eleanor trilogy: Time and Chance, When Christ and His Saints Slept and Devil's Brood.

Elizabeth Chadwick: The Champion about William Marshal

All Historical fiction based on real people. Chadwick has quite a few more all about the same time period.
  #46  
Old 04-23-2011, 07:12 AM
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Sharon Penman also has a bunch of good mediaeval mystery novels, starting with The Queen's Man, set in the Crusades era. I actually preferred them to her straight historical novels, which were rather long.
  #47  
Old 07-26-2011, 07:53 PM
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The Lies of Locke Lamorra is Fantasy & Ocean's 11 banter. I adored it. ( Ymmv.)

No less than Gods is alt-history that is a fun read. Another doper recommended it to me and I couldn't put it down.

The Iron Duke . If you like alt history, sci fi, hot sex and some banter, this book has it all.
  #48  
Old 07-26-2011, 09:33 PM
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I also recommend Barry Hugart's Bridge of Birds: A Novel of Ancient China that never was.
Oh, my, YES!
  #49  
Old 07-29-2011, 08:09 PM
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If you're looking for a light-hearted fantasy fairy tale, I think you would love a book by a new author that I am working with: (S)Mythology by Jeremy Tarr. It's a modern day fairy tale that is wry and whimsical, and tackles life...death...and the Underworld. The book is fun and super cute with illustrations by artist Katy Smail, which really bring the main character Sophie to life. I just finished it and couldn't put it down!

You can read the first three chapters and check out the illustrations at www.smythology.co.uk or check out the book on Amazon here: http://amzn.to/Shardcover.

Enjoy!
  #50  
Old 07-30-2011, 03:15 PM
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Moderating


AlexW52, please don't use this site to promote commercial ventures like that. It's close to spamming.
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