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  #1  
Old 10-18-2010, 03:37 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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Siberian Husky\Border Collie mix - puppy: What should I expect?

My SO and I are picking up our new puppy today - he's a Siberian Husky Border Collie mix, [pics to come after we get him home] and we are unsure what to expect. I know Border's very well, they are smart and love to herd everything. But I have little to no experience with the husky side. I'm pretty sure looking at his paws that he's going to be a good sized pup, but I'm not sure what else to expect.

We have a large, 2.5 acre yard that is totally fenced in - I'm hoping he won't scale the fence, but he's still a puppy so we have time to train him. He's going to have a lot of room to run and play, and with our other dog he's not going to be lonely.

I'm wondering if he will train quickly, he's got the border in him, but I don't know what the Husky side will do. Additionally, our other dog is a Beagle\Lab mix, not very smart, doesn't listen all that well...but can melt the heart of Cthulhu himself.

One concern is that the training we do with [as yet to be named puppy] will get hemmed up by the other dog who is still training at 2 years old. Should we train the new pup separately? I'm sure I'll have more questions as we get to know the little guy.
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  #2  
Old 10-18-2010, 03:42 PM
Candyman74 Candyman74 is offline
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A husky has even more endurance than a border collie. Both are bred to run and work all day; the border collie side has more explosive energy than the husky side, but the husky side never lets up.

Huskies are bright. They're not quite border collie bright, but they are bright.

At a guess, I'd say you will have a large, strong border collie, slightly less explosive and neurotic, but will keep going for longer.
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Old 10-18-2010, 04:01 PM
PunditLisa PunditLisa is offline
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My brother had a border collie and a husky (two different dogs). The former got out of the yard all the time and the latter was a hopeless follower. Both were very sweet.
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Old 10-18-2010, 04:06 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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We already have an invisible fence that goes around the entire 2.5 acres - we never turn it on because the little one can't get over the fence and hasn't the smarts to dig under it. We may have to use it for the new dog, but I'd rather a well trained pup than electro-shock therapy.
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  #5  
Old 10-18-2010, 04:12 PM
EmAnJ EmAnJ is offline
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We had a Husky (we had to put her down this past spring ) and also have a Husky/Shepard cross.

Very high energy and sometimes too smart for their own good. Our purebred Husky scaled our 5.5 foot fence a few times - we built a 6.5 foot fence and she couldn't get out of that one!

She was hard to train - it took about two years to get her to heel properly - but once she was trained, she was a VERY obedient dog. She rarely took off, though I've been told Huskies are notorious runners.

We had to exercise her (them) daily with a minimum of 1 hour off leash at least 6 days a week.

Great dogs! Can't wait to see pictures!
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  #6  
Old 10-18-2010, 04:14 PM
EmAnJ EmAnJ is offline
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Originally Posted by Phlosphr View Post

I'm wondering if he will train quickly, he's got the border in him, but I don't know what the Husky side will do. Additionally, our other dog is a Beagle\Lab mix, not very smart, doesn't listen all that well...but can melt the heart of Cthulhu himself.

One concern is that the training we do with [as yet to be named puppy] will get hemmed up by the other dog who is still training at 2 years old. Should we train the new pup separately? I'm sure I'll have more questions as we get to know the little guy.
Oh, to comment on this, I'd train separately. We foster rescue's, and notice that they quickly mimic what our dog does. You can obviously see their brain working on the concepts, it's really amazing. Anyhow, if your current dog is misbehaving still, I'd worry that the new pup might pick up the bad habits.
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  #7  
Old 10-18-2010, 04:14 PM
Airk Airk is offline
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It's not "electro shock therapy". It's training. The way an invisible fence is supposed to work is that the dog gets a shock once, goes "HOLY CRAP! THAT WAS NO FUN!" and learns to stay on its property. The collar also gives an audible warning if the dog is getting close to the barrier, so there's really no reason for the animal to get shocked.

An invisible fence RELIES on you having a well trained dog. Otherwise, any reasonably quick animal with the proverbial bit in its teeth can just bolt across the "restricted" area and be gone in an eyeblink. The two methods are by no means mutually exclusive.
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  #8  
Old 10-18-2010, 04:45 PM
Anne Neville Anne Neville is offline
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A cute, smart dog, and a demand for pictures.
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  #9  
Old 10-18-2010, 04:48 PM
JohnT JohnT is offline
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A dog that will want to herd moose.
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  #10  
Old 10-18-2010, 05:57 PM
Clothahump Clothahump is offline
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Quote:
Siberian Husky\Border Collie mix - puppy: What should I expect?
Don't be surprised if you come home some day and find your kids rounded up and hitched to a Radio Flyer wagon with the dog sitting in it.
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  #11  
Old 10-18-2010, 06:01 PM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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You'll get a dog that will round you up and then keep you warm in the winter.
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  #12  
Old 10-18-2010, 06:07 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is offline
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A dog that will want to herd moose.
We have a winnah!
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  #13  
Old 10-18-2010, 06:08 PM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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Lots and lots of undercoat. Brush the dog well and often.
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  #14  
Old 10-18-2010, 06:09 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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Tumbleweeds made of dog hair.

Seriously: Both breeds have a double coat and are generally adapted to be able to use their coat to keep warm. If you don't brush the dog often, and even if you do, you'd better be willing to deal with a lot of hair everywhere the dog lives.
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  #15  
Old 10-18-2010, 06:29 PM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Never actually lived with a Husky. but my experience observing Huskies and talking to sled-breed-lovers leads me to understand most of the sled breeds, Huskies included, thrive with a little more...direction from their humans than some dogs. Not to say you should "dominate" them, but they do well when given a job or role and they can clearly know what is expected of them.

The ones that I've seen get into trouble usually do so when they've been ignored for long periods of time or when raised by people who seem to be expecting a lapdog and never train or communicate clear expectations to the dogs.

It's not abusive to ask a sled breed to perform some kind of task; they have a strong work ethic and IMHO feel more secure when they know they are contributing to their pack's success and pleasing pack leadership. Given the border collie mix, I suggest some kind of dog sport would be a great way to grow together.
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  #16  
Old 10-18-2010, 08:07 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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I love collies as they are even tempered. With a couple of acres and another dog to play with they can pretty much entertain themselves, but it's always nice to give them things to do.
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  #17  
Old 10-18-2010, 09:00 PM
LVBoPeep LVBoPeep is online now
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Hello,

One thing to be very aware of is that a border collie that "herds everything" is just as ill-mannered as a any dog that chases things it shouldn't. Herding instinct doesn't excuse bad behavior and what can be adorable as a pup for a few minutes can easily turn into a very problematic, neurotic behavior in a young adult. I have folks come out quite a bit that are convinced that their dog is the next world-class sheepdog champion based entirely on it's raging desire to chase kids on bikes.

Both are nice breeds but you could have a troublemaker in training. All will be fine if you remember that all dogs, but especially border collies IMHO, are better behaved, happier and more secure if they have structure and basic obedience training in their daily lives. I currently live with five of them - all house dogs when not working - and they are very easy to live with once we got past puppyhood.
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  #18  
Old 10-19-2010, 12:24 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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Some promised pics Here, here, and here. Adorable...perhaps illegally so. His name is Grady.
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  #19  
Old 10-19-2010, 12:58 PM
StGermain StGermain is offline
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I would say expect strong, stubborn and driven. He'll know what he wants and he'll work until it happens. It's best to make him want to please you and work for you, because it'll give him something to work at. He'll want to be working and he won't be writing the Great American Novel with his time.

Very nice-looking dog. I don't think he's cute, he's handsome.

StG
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  #20  
Old 10-19-2010, 01:10 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Wow. Way shorter fur than I was expecting out of that mix. No lab at all in that one? (Pic # 3 is particularly nice.)
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  #21  
Old 10-19-2010, 01:45 PM
Anne Neville Anne Neville is offline
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Originally Posted by Phlosphr View Post
Some promised pics Here, here, and here. Adorable...perhaps illegally so. His name is Grady.
SQUEEE! I like picture #1, with those blue eyes looking up at you.
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  #22  
Old 10-19-2010, 02:32 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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No Lab - apparently the owners of mom and dad were not such good owners and the entire littler was taken by the ASPCA. But Dad is full Siberian, mom is full Border.

And let me tell you this little guy is smart! I am happy he has a lot of room to run, and I am going to start Frisbee training once he fully learns his name, and fully understands basic commands. He's already sitting for us and slept through the night with zero whining. I think he was probably sleeping on the other dog...but that's ok right?
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  #23  
Old 10-19-2010, 03:10 PM
missred missred is online now
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He's a handsome boy!

I've never had a husky-collie mix, but I've had or been around both. Keep him busy. Constantly challenge him to new things. If he's anything like the sum of his breeds, he'll be a loyal, intelligent companion for you.
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  #24  
Old 10-19-2010, 03:22 PM
Duckster Duckster is offline
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A dog that will want to herd moose.
If you take it to a political rally it will herd all the candidates you dislike into a corner.
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  #25  
Old 10-19-2010, 03:45 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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We already have an invisible fence that goes around the entire 2.5 acres - we never turn it on because the little one can't get over the fence and hasn't the smarts to dig under it. We may have to use it for the new dog, but I'd rather a well trained pup than electro-shock therapy.
The new dog will be smart and energetic enough to get under, over and through the fence. That type of dog will climb a leaning tree and use it to get over the fence. They are scary smart escape artists, and have boundless energy. Expect everything short of wirecutters and lockpicks. I am not kidding. My husky mix hit one section of the chain link over and over and over until it bent/bowed, then walked/climbed up the links and out! She had no problem opening the standard gate 'lock". Think like this- what could a dog do with the escape skills of Steve McQueen from "The Great Escape" but without opposable thumbs?

Huskies need to know you are the Alpha. This is critical.
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  #26  
Old 10-20-2010, 06:29 PM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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I have found huskys can be somewhat willful, but once trained, are very obedient. Both a husky and border collie need a lot of exercise and if you have any runners in the family, let him run with them.

I expect him to be very smart and can learn anything he wants to.
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  #27  
Old 10-20-2010, 07:00 PM
rhubarbarin rhubarbarin is offline
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OMFG he's GORGEOUS.

From the breeds alone I would expect a brilliant but independent and free-thinking dog that needs as much directed exercise as you can possibly give, consistent training and communication, 'jobs' to keep his brain busy, and will likely have a tendency be destructive or find a way to escape your property to get to more interesting places if it doesn't get all of the above.

Also, the shedding. Good god, the shedding. Although his coat looks mercifully short at this point in time (but does look very dense). Some Huskies have a short coat and some BCs have fairly short ones as well.

I am far too lazy to keep dogs that require that much activity but I know many good owners with BCs, Huskies and other high-drive, high-energy breeds and they have a blast with them.
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  #28  
Old 10-20-2010, 07:07 PM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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Expect poop. Piles of poop.
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  #29  
Old 10-20-2010, 07:09 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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I just ran up the side of the mountain [still recovering, cough cough] and about a tenth of the way up I decided to see if he was going to be a good trail dog and stay with me off leash or bolt. Mind you he's a pup and never been leash trained or anything...To my surprise he stayed right with me, came when called and even stayed with me at the top when I sat to rest without bolting. So, I kept him off leash and he walked right down with me and all the way back to the house as if I'd had him for years. I don't know if that is intelligence, or he just likes me, or what - but I know the other dog, the beagle mix would have bolted and we'd still be out there with treats yelling his name.

I'll try it out a few more times close to home, but we're close to bringing him to a national park which will be a good test. One not so good thing is that our other dog freaks out when he's on a leash when he sees another dog....so not sure how to rectify that, his leash aggression is very bad at times.

Does anyone know if our new dog could help train the other one not to be leash aggressive? And how to do that. I want a good trail dog, and so far this new guy is passing all the tests with flying colors.
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  #30  
Old 10-20-2010, 07:31 PM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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There's a good book on leash aggression on Amazon.
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  #31  
Old 10-20-2010, 07:34 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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I think that is best, to get the book I mean. He's ridiculous when it comes to trying to hike with him. We can't go past any other dogs or he chokes himself needlessly until the other dog it out of site. We even bought the gentle lead because he was pulling so hard, not he just continues to pull but can't get very far. It stinks because sometimes we want to chat with the folks walking by and it doesn't happen. I'll get the book, but for the time being we may be doing separate hikes.
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  #32  
Old 10-20-2010, 07:46 PM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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My girl is good with every thing, even horses and bikes and well, everything, except other dogs. Alas, I have not yet had the opportunity to use the book, because we only seem to run across another dog when we are running and I don't have time to stop then.
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  #33  
Old 10-20-2010, 08:07 PM
rhubarbarin rhubarbarin is offline
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Be very careful with the leash aggression. I've found that it's catching.

Last edited by rhubarbarin; 10-20-2010 at 08:08 PM..
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  #34  
Old 10-20-2010, 09:35 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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You'll get a dog that will round you up and then keep you warm in the winter.
And will build a sled itself, then pull it.
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  #35  
Old 10-21-2010, 08:30 PM
norinew norinew is offline
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Some years ago, my hubby had a job training guard dogs. One of the dogs that was given to him to train was a full Husky. Beautiful, simply gorgeous, dog. Problem: she would not bite. She would growl, bark, posture when 'baited', but would not bite. No one's going to buy a guard dog that won't bite!

I really, really, really wanted to keep her. She was so smart, loyal, obedient, loving and gentle. Unfortunately, we were living with my folks at the time, and my father already had a 'yard dog' and my mother had a 'house dog', so mom said no, we've got enough dogs already.

I'll say I was really pleased, though, when we were able to place her with an older couple whose Afghan Hound had died recently!

I've always thought the ideal family dog would be a Husky/Akita mix. Protective, loyal, smart, hard-working and beautiful, too.

Your Grady is a charmer! Good luck!
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  #36  
Old 10-22-2010, 07:08 AM
Snite Snite is offline
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Expect a good comrade.
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  #37  
Old 10-22-2010, 07:51 AM
Shirley Ujest Shirley Ujest is offline
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Pictures of Adorablenessness? Check

Name? What the fook is this dog's name?


I need closure, dammit!




( I was expecting Lots and Lots of FUR, like This fur coat goes to 11 kinda fur.)

Wishing you many years of happy times!
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  #38  
Old 10-22-2010, 07:59 AM
don't ask don't ask is offline
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I was talking to a guy at work who breeds German Shepherds. I told him that I had worked out the perfect dog breed, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Rottweiler cross.

"The looks of a Rottweiler with the temperament of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel," I said.

"Or the opposite," he replied.
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  #39  
Old 10-22-2010, 12:49 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest View Post
Pictures of Adorablenessness? Check

Name? What the fook is this dog's name?


I need closure, dammit!




( I was expecting Lots and Lots of FUR, like This fur coat goes to 11 kinda fur.)

Wishing you many years of happy times!
His name is Grady. A nice, New England name, now that we live in Colorado fulltime
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  #40  
Old 10-22-2010, 02:04 PM
SlowMindThinking SlowMindThinking is offline
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As a kid, we had both border collies and huskies. I love both breeds, but they are definitely energetic. Our huskies loved to escape, as had been said. You also need to be sure your border collie is trained enough not to try and herd kids on bikes, or motorcyclists. That can be the death of them.

I hope you are high up in Colorado. Along the front range, it can get awfully hot for a husky. (If Grady has ready access to a creek, you might find the furball standing in it facing downstream, so the water will open up the fur.) Winter, obviously, is not going to be a problem.
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  #41  
Old 10-22-2010, 03:21 PM
An Arky An Arky is offline
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Nice looking dog! He looks a little like our puppy, who is a 6 mo. old mix of Akita and Lab. Winslow
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  #42  
Old 10-23-2010, 05:26 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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Originally Posted by SlowMindThinking View Post
As a kid, we had both border collies and huskies. I love both breeds, but they are definitely energetic. Our huskies loved to escape, as had been said. You also need to be sure your border collie is trained enough not to try and herd kids on bikes, or motorcyclists. That can be the death of them.

I hope you are high up in Colorado. Along the front range, it can get awfully hot for a husky. (If Grady has ready access to a creek, you might find the furball standing in it facing downstream, so the water will open up the fur.) Winter, obviously, is not going to be a problem.
We're at about 8200-ft so it never really gets above 80 in the summers, and we have a small wallow creek on the 2.5 acres, so he should be fine, we are training a lot already, but I am augmenting the fence in areas where I think he may be able to scale it when he's big enough. As for digging under it? I can't bury 2.5 square acres of fence...I have no idea how many linear feet that is. I'm banking on training to keep him in the yard, and the other pooch we have to gnaw\I mean play with.
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  #43  
Old 10-23-2010, 05:43 PM
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It's a good thing you have a sizable area for him to run around in, because that dog will have energy and will be high-strung if not given a good opportunity to work that energy off. Much less land than that and I'd be questioning your decision to get him. I'd invest in a tennis racket and balls if he's the sort to fetch, because you'll need to wear him out frequently. Also, no matter how well you think you've fenced the place, he will find any oversight and get out; it's a fact of life.
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  #44  
Old 10-24-2010, 02:56 PM
Phlosphr Phlosphr is offline
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Unfortunately, I know. Our neighbor has been here for 27 years and has said all of her dogs got out - to further the despair on getting out, she also lost 4 dogs in that time to Mountain Lions. He's a smart dog and we are training him constantly. I am hoping his tag is sufficient to get him back to us if he does get out...it's got his name and our address and phone on it, and he's personable enough to go up to anyone...
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  #45  
Old 10-25-2010, 03:54 PM
SlowMindThinking SlowMindThinking is offline
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8200 ought to be great. I guess I could probably figure out where you are, based on that altitude and being able to own 2.5 acres. (Unless you're rich, it ain't a ski resort!).

I'd take him for a run every day. My dogs absolutely live for that. Near as the family can tell, that is why I am the focus of their existence. Of course, I'm done to a couple of Goldens. There is a reason they're not known for running. Once yours is a year old, take him every reasonable day and he will never leave your side.
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  #46  
Old 10-25-2010, 07:53 PM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Once yours is a year old
Quoted for emphasis -- don't make a puppy run significant distances while young; it can be bad for bones and joints. Let him do all the spontaneous play he wants, but no marathons. Once he's a year old -- maybe even a bit older, some places say 18 months to 2 years -- run him 'til he drops, happily, at your feet.
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  #47  
Old 10-25-2010, 11:09 PM
DHMO DHMO is offline
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We have two gorgeous pedigreed Siberians, and they are the light of our lives. When the older one was a year old, we got her a puppy for her birthday present. The two are like sisters—with all that implies. They absolutely love each other, play constantly, and even squabble now and then, like siblings do. We spent a lot of time teaching the older one (Shena Punum) obedience for the first year.The older one took the younger (Calliste) under her wing and taught her many of the behaviors. Kind of like, "this is how we do things here..."

Pictures of the Girls

We live in a suburb of Denver, and they have thrived, even in summer. My wife and her family had a pure-bred Husky in Florida who lived to be 17 years old, so, they are quite adaptable to temperature. Second the advice on brushing. Get him to enjoy the experience, and brush as much as he'll take.

Border Collies and Huskies are wicked smart. This is a double-edged sword—they learn very, very quickly, and they get bored very, very quickly. Keep it fun, short and varied, and he'll do well. Our girls are in a standard residential backyard, big enough they can get up to full speed. We only have a 3-foot chain-link fence, but they've never shown an interest in getting out. Many Husky owners talk of "Husky Houdinis" who can and do get out of any yard, no matter how well-fenced. I think keeping them occupied and entertained works better to prevent escapes.

My family had many Shelties while I was growing up. While not quite the same as Border Collies, they have a lot of similarities—infinite energy, for one.

You have quite a handsome dog there! Best of luck with him!
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  #48  
Old 11-18-2010, 04:12 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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So, how is the new pup working out?
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  #49  
Old 07-04-2012, 03:30 AM
Redrum Redrum is offline
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I have recently got a border collie husky cross, she is a lovely little thing, full of energy and very loving. She is quite hard to walk on the lease and gets extremely excited but she's only 13weeks so is still training. Any tips on lease walking would be appreciated. this mix of breeds gives you a super high energy dog, she will run around for hours on end and never seems to get tired! She is good with bikes and will run along next to them, the aim being she will eventually do this without the leash, it's a good way to keep up with her energy levels. Any tips/links for training would be appreciated.

Good luck with the pup, give her lots of love and attention.

Dave
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  #50  
Old 07-04-2012, 07:59 AM
Spud Spud is offline
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She is quite hard to walk on the lease

Any tips on lease walking would be appreciated.
First thing I would do is get a leash .

Seriously, look up "Gentle Leader." It worked wonders on my labs that had been trained to run once the leash was attached (the previous owner was a runner who did this to exercise them... not so good when my kids who weighed half as much wanted to take them for a walk). It works on the same principal as horse tack... they pull and it points the muzzle down so they naturally stop. Within a week they were walking perfectly on leash.

Hopefully the OP will respond since his dog should be beyond the puppy stage now (two years later).
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