The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-30-2010, 02:17 AM
Mississippienne Mississippienne is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
How much do orthotics cost?

Last year I found out I had a neuroma in my right foot and got a cortisone injection that killed the pain for awhile. The pain had long since returned, and I finally got enough money to go to a podiatrist here in Queens and get another cortisone shot. He wanted to do an x-ray to make sure nothing else was wrong with my feet, to which I agreed. Today, we got the results back and he told me that I have the beginnings of hammertoes.

According to the doc, my condition is far from severe, but will worsen over time without surgery. He thinks that, with care, I'll be fine for several years before I need surgery. Since I don't have health insurance, he suggested that I try orthotics for now until I somehow come into enough money for surgery. His estimated price for a custom orthotic is about $400, which is a hell of a lot for me (I'm a waitress). I already paid him $200 for two visits, one cortistone shot, and the x-rays, plus I just went to the endocrinologist (good news there: no hyperthyroidism) and paid $600 for a crown for a tooth. The thought of having crippled feet on top of a neuroma is overwhelming.

My questions: is $400 a normal amount for custom orthotics? Should I try over-the-counter orthotics first and then graduate to custom if needed? Is surgery really inevitable or is there any hope that orthotics will fix the problem? My friend told me to get a second opinion, but goddamn, I can't afford to go to extra podiatry appointments.
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 10-30-2010, 09:15 AM
astro astro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Re "hammertoes" it often seems to be less of question of orthotics and more of simply getting a pair of shoes that fit comfortably and correctly with plenty of room in the toe box area. Women are often in pursuit of "small" and "cute" at the expense of their feet.

I'd suggest trying a pair of Keen's to see if you can get relief. You might try half a size larger than normal as well.

If you want you can also try getting a pair of orthopedic shoes on ebay for maximum toe room.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-30-2010, 09:48 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Do yourself a favor and buy a pair of Dansko Professional Clogs and make sure they aren't too tight (they're supposed to fit loose). They are a helluva lot cheaper than a custom orthotic and will give your forefoot the room it needs while also providing excellent arch support. Don't continue wearing the same shoes that have gotten you into this situation in the first place. (Assuming your issues aren't purely genetic.)

I've worked on my feet for most of my adult life and those clogs, while not the most attractive thing to wear, made a huge difference in eliminating severe lumbar and foot pain years ago. Also, spend as much time as you can stretching and exercising your feet to strengthen them and counteract the misshaping that footwear can cause. With stronger musculature and more limber tendons, you may eventually find you need to rely less on external support.

I second the recommendation to look into Keens as well. They are much wider in the toe box than most shoes and are shaped more the way our feet are supposed to be shaped.

Please, do make sure you're wearing the correct size. Not saying you aren't, but it's a common enough problem to mention. I'd estimate that 90% of the people I see that have foot problems come in wearing their shoes too small and are shocked/appalled that I'm recommending a half to full size larger. Shoe sizes are no more static than pant sizes; the fit changes from brand to brand, design to design, but also your 40-year-old feet and not the same as your 18-year-old feet.




_____
Disclaimer: I work for REI and, of course, my post here is my own personal opinion and does not represent REI in any way.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-30-2010, 09:54 AM
Surly Chick Surly Chick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Face down in the dirt.
Posts: 2,499
I second the Dansko clogs. I have bone spurs in my feet and they're the only shoes I can wear without pain. And the toe box is big so it shouldn't squish your toes. They come in all kinds of fun colors and patterns and I always get compliments on mine.

As for the orthotics, I paid $450 for mine several years ago. They really helped with the pain and I don't have to wear them all the time now. But my insurance covered a good portion of it.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-30-2010, 03:57 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: The Middle of Nowhere, WI
Posts: 10,667
Yup, $400 is what mine cost (though insurance paid 80%). I don't wear them, though, because my problem went away when I threw out my Crocs.

And I also love Dansko/Sanita clogs.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-30-2010, 05:17 PM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chicago-ish, IL
Posts: 9,257
I think I paid $350 for my last pair of custom orthotics, so $400 doesn't sound out of whack. You could always try buying one of the Dansko shoe styles that has a thick removable insole; they are damn fine shoes in any case, but then if you need the orthotics anyway, you can probably wear them with the Danskos, which hold up forever. (Check danskooutlet.com, Zappos.com, etc. once you know what size you need.)

Custom orthotics still beat the hell out of daily anti-inflammatories, cortisone injections, etc. - less invasive, and cheaper in the long run. I've had my current pair for going on 3 years. (And a neuroma is one of my issues, too - it hasn't bothered me since they added the neuroma pad to my last pair of orthotics.)

Last edited by Eva Luna; 10-30-2010 at 05:18 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-30-2010, 05:26 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
A nitpick: my doctor gently pointed out to me that the correct term is "orthoses", not orthotics. Orthotics is the medical field, orthoses are what they make.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-30-2010, 07:37 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
A nitpick: my doctor gently pointed out to me that the correct term is "orthoses", not orthotics. Orthotics is the medical field, orthoses are what they make.
Your doctor might want to have a word with the American Podiatric Medical Association, in that case.

Last edited by Brown Eyed Girl; 10-30-2010 at 07:37 PM.. Reason: not podiatrist
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-30-2010, 07:49 PM
Ace Weederman Ace Weederman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
May I put a word in for a therapy other than orthotics? I'm not a doctor or therapist of any kind, but I have had spine surgery, thankfully only one time.

When I was on the path to a second surgery (disc problems again), I found a treatment called Rolfing Structural Integration. I hesitate to even recommend it here since I don't want to proselytize. But it was a very effective treatment for me. Not cheap, but way less costly (on many levels) than surgery!

I know rolfers do work with the feet. My rolfer worked on mine, and I remember that she mentioned how unhealthy she thought orthotics were, generally. I'm not saying your orthotics would be unhealthy, Mississippienne, just that you may find great relief from rolfing.

Best of luck and I hope you feel better soon, whatever path you take!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-30-2010, 08:01 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
Your doctor might want to have a word with the American Podiatric Medical Association, in that case.
Or tho sis. Or thot ics. Among hundreds of others. All that aside, the terms are generally used interchangeably, if incorrectly.

Last edited by Chefguy; 10-30-2010 at 08:04 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-30-2010, 08:56 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Or tho sis. Or thot ics. Among hundreds of others. All that aside, the terms are generally used interchangeably, if incorrectly.
OK, but 'orthotics' is used not just by podiatrists, but by just about everyone else as well, so it's pretty much understood what people are talking about when they refer to orthotic devices by the shorthand, orthotics. Just like prostheses are often referred to as prosthetics.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-30-2010, 09:05 PM
Daddypants Daddypants is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Mine have always been free since my uncle is a podiatrist However, I've always heard in the $500 range.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-30-2010, 11:10 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
OK, but 'orthotics' is used not just by podiatrists, but by just about everyone else as well, so it's pretty much understood what people are talking about when they refer to orthotic devices by the shorthand, orthotics. Just like prostheses are often referred to as prosthetics.
Yes, that's why I called it a nitpick and said that the terms are used interchangeably. Or did you miss that part? Hell, I also call them orthotics.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-30-2010, 11:59 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Yes, that's why I called it a nitpick and said that the terms are used interchangeably. Or did you miss that part? Hell, I also call them orthotics.
Fine. I'll be nice then and I won't call you a grammar nazi.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-31-2010, 09:11 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
Fine. I'll be nice then and I won't call you a grammar nazi.
Does that mean I have to remove my shoulder patch? To further confuse things, "prosthetic" is also apparently somewhat incorrect. It's either a "prosthetic device" or a "prosthesis". The people who make these things are orthoticists or prostheticists, according to national organization sites.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-31-2010, 02:35 PM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
I recommend "try any other treatments first". I had a host of problems (ankle rolling, shin splints, etc) while a runner in high school. I got custom orthotics, something like $200, $250 maybe. They were horridly uncomfortable. They sit in a closet now. Lots of people's custom orthotics sit in a closet, and they're not exactly returnable.

Meanwhile, I love Spenco Polysorb insoles (though they could have better arch supports. Also may try Superfeet's berry insoles; both have excellent reviews on Amazon. Superfeet are like custom; you heat them in the oven and stand in them for a bit to mold them.

I may start a thread on the best insoles for work shoes, since mine don't have removable inserts so they'd have to be super-thin.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-31-2010, 04:06 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindsaybluth View Post
Meanwhile, I love Spenco Polysorb insoles (though they could have better arch supports. Also may try Superfeet's berry insoles; both have excellent reviews on Amazon.
If you are referring to these Spenco Polysorbs, they are a completely different type than the Berry Superfeet. These Spencos are soft orthotics, which are not designed really for arch support but more for shock absorption and relieving pressure in sore areas (i.e., soreness from bone spurs and lack of adequate fat pads). They are made of foam only, which is completely flexible and does not support weight, so they will not stop the arch from overpronating or collapsing.

The Superfeet are a rigid orthotic with a bit of dense foam on top and a rigid plastic form on the bottom that runs from heel to midfoot which supports the arch, preventing collapse or overpronation, and the heel, reducing the spreading out of the fat pad from under the heel bone to alleviate pain from lack of natural cushioning.

You really can't compare these two orthotics. They aren't designed to perform the same tasks.

Quote:
Superfeet are like custom; you heat them in the oven and stand in them for a bit to mold them.
This is actually incorrect. Although Superfeet does sell custom orthotics, the one you are referring to, as well as the Green, Blue, Orange, and Black, are not heat moldable. They are, however, trim-to-fit (length-/width-wise). You trim them, stick them in your shoes and go.

If you prefer a heat moldable orthotic that does provide arch support, but allows for natural pronation and movement in the foot, take a look at the Sole semi-rigid orthotics. They also get good reviews.

I've worn the Berry Superfeet and the Dean Karnazes Soles and I prefer the flexibility of the Soles, but with a medium arch, I found I needed "break-in" time to get used to the feel of them in the arch area. They are a bit more aggressive than the Superfeet and I find that it's rare for a flat-footed person to find them comfortable, honestly.

Quote:
I may start a thread on the best insoles for work shoes, since mine don't have removable inserts so they'd have to be super-thin.
Try the Black Superfeet. They are for low volume shoes, like casual or slip-ons, or for shoes in which you can't remove the sockliners. They take up less space in the shoe leaving more room for your foot. The Black arch support is lower, however, than that of the Berry as it's designed for flat to low arches, whereas Berry is more for medium to high and also has extra foam in the forefoot for shock absorption.

Last edited by Brown Eyed Girl; 10-31-2010 at 04:09 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-05-2010, 01:56 AM
Mississippienne Mississippienne is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
I ordered a Blue Superfeet last night, let's see how it goes. I was thinking of buying one of those gel toe-spacer things that you slip on over your toes while walking around your place barefoot -- would that help my hammertoes?

I have another appointment with the podiatrist next Friday. I think I'm going to tell him to hold off on the custom orthotics for awhile. I might get another cortisone shot (the neuroma pain really isn't subsiding) or graduate up to an alcohol shot.

I'm really sad about this. I was never a heel-wearer, and I always felt like I bought fairly sensible shoes. I think I just have crappy feet.

If I do end up needing surgery to remove the neuroma, I'd like to save up and do it all at one time -- the neuroma, the ganglion, and the hammertoes. I wonder if this is do-able. I'll ask my podiatrist when I see him.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:49 AM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 6,457
I really know very little about orthotics, but I just wanted to mention that as I walked through WalMart last night they had a new display up...a scanner-type machine that you stand on in shoe-less feet ("Cleaned regularly with Anti-bacterial products!") and it tells you what type of orthotics to buy from their display. I didn't check prices or try it. no idea even what company it was, though I think it might be Dr. Scholls.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-05-2010, 09:12 AM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
This is actually incorrect. Although Superfeet does sell custom orthotics, the one you are referring to, as well as the Green, Blue, Orange, and Black, are not heat moldable. They are, however, trim-to-fit (length-/width-wise). You trim them, stick them in your shoes and go.

If you prefer a heat moldable orthotic that does provide arch support, but allows for natural pronation and movement in the foot, take a look at the Sole semi-rigid orthotics. They also get good reviews..
Whoops, my mistake. I thought Amazon reviewers were saying to stick 'em in the oven, so I was going based on that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
I'm really sad about this. I was never a heel-wearer, and I always felt like I bought fairly sensible shoes. I think I just have crappy feet.
Keep it mind it's not always about genetics but also about weight. If you're putting extra weight on those feet for years and years it doesn't matter what kind of sensible shoes you wear.

Let us know how the blue superfeet work! The arches of my polysorbs just aren't high enough, so I was thinking of graduating to the blue or berry superfeet.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11-05-2010, 09:27 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
If you are referring to these Spenco Polysorbs, they are a completely different type than the Berry Superfeet. These Spencos are soft orthotics, which are not designed really for arch support but more for shock absorption and relieving pressure in sore areas (i.e., soreness from bone spurs and lack of adequate fat pads). They are made of foam only, which is completely flexible and does not support weight, so they will not stop the arch from overpronating or collapsing.

The Superfeet are a rigid orthotic with a bit of dense foam on top and a rigid plastic form on the bottom that runs from heel to midfoot which supports the arch, preventing collapse or overpronation, and the heel, reducing the spreading out of the fat pad from under the heel bone to alleviate pain from lack of natural cushioning.

You really can't compare these two orthotics. They aren't designed to perform the same tasks.


This is actually incorrect. Although Superfeet does sell custom orthotics, the one you are referring to, as well as the Green, Blue, Orange, and Black, are not heat moldable. They are, however, trim-to-fit (length-/width-wise). You trim them, stick them in your shoes and go.

If you prefer a heat moldable orthotic that does provide arch support, but allows for natural pronation and movement in the foot, take a look at the Sole semi-rigid orthotics. They also get good reviews.

I've worn the Berry Superfeet and the Dean Karnazes Soles and I prefer the flexibility of the Soles, but with a medium arch, I found I needed "break-in" time to get used to the feel of them in the arch area. They are a bit more aggressive than the Superfeet and I find that it's rare for a flat-footed person to find them comfortable, honestly.


Try the Black Superfeet. They are for low volume shoes, like casual or slip-ons, or for shoes in which you can't remove the sockliners. They take up less space in the shoe leaving more room for your foot. The Black arch support is lower, however, than that of the Berry as it's designed for flat to low arches, whereas Berry is more for medium to high and also has extra foam in the forefoot for shock absorption.
I decided to try the Soles, based on your recommendation. My plantars has been really flaring up lately. While I love Keen shoes and recommend them to people with plantars, the inserts wear out quickly and the pain returns. The Soles seem to be working out so far, but it's only been a couple of days so it's too early yet.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-05-2010, 10:43 AM
Horatio Hellpop Horatio Hellpop is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jinan, China
Posts: 7,693
When I got my orthotics (and that's what both the doctor and the maker called them), he initially wanted to charge about $400. I explained that my insurance wouldn't cover much of it, and he knocked the price down to $200.

I know many people consider chiropodists and related practitioners to be pseudoscientific quacks. But after years of pain and trying different types of shoes and Dr. Scholl's, my experience was that orthotics were a life saver. Best money I ever spent.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-05-2010, 10:54 AM
Mississippienne Mississippienne is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindsaybluth View Post
Keep it mind it's not always about genetics but also about weight. If you're putting extra weight on those feet for years and years it doesn't matter what kind of sensible shoes you wear..
It's definitely not the weight -- I'm about 5'7 and weigh about 120 lbs. I can't get that much skinnier. But I've always had weak ankles, and now with the neuroma, ganglion, and hammertoes, I think its a certainty that my feet are just crap. And I'm 25, so its not like I'm ancient and these problems built up over time.

Last edited by Mississippienne; 11-05-2010 at 10:54 AM.. Reason: sp
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11-05-2010, 11:14 AM
Loisseau Loisseau is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2003
Over the counter orthotics are a hit or miss situation. My podiatrist got me into a set of custom orthotics for $170. Best thing ever for my plantar fasciitis.

Last edited by Loisseau; 11-05-2010 at 11:15 AM.. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 11-05-2010, 06:19 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,802
400 is pretty routine (I think "rack rate" for mine is in that range, maybe a bit higher - DC metro area so Queens prices would be similar).

Do look into shoes that provide support, and plenty of room for the tootsies. I haven't tried Dansko but I do like Birkenstocks; the podiatrist recommended them as being good for plantar fasciitis and neuroma.

What I've found they're NOT good for, sometimes, is that I've developed bunionettes (like a regular big-toe bunion, only on the pinky-toe joint). Summer 2009 I had a lot of pain when wearing my Birks. Less so this past summer but I wore other types of sandals as well.

Of course such shoes aren't cheap either (100+ bucks) but certainly that's less than 400.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 11-05-2010, 06:58 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
It's definitely not the weight -- I'm about 5'7 and weigh about 120 lbs. I can't get that much skinnier. But I've always had weak ankles, and now with the neuroma, ganglion, and hammertoes, I think its a certainty that my feet are just crap. And I'm 25, so its not like I'm ancient and these problems built up over time.
There are a variety of things that can contribute, including flat feet, high arches, sudden weight gain, sudden increase in exercise, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 11-05-2010, 10:37 PM
Signy Signy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
My daughter's AFOs cost 1500/pair.

They have to be custom made. Don't know if that's what you need.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 11-06-2010, 11:32 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I decided to try the Soles, based on your recommendation. My plantars has been really flaring up lately. While I love Keen shoes and recommend them to people with plantars, the inserts wear out quickly and the pain returns. The Soles seem to be working out so far, but it's only been a couple of days so it's too early yet.
Cool! I do hope they help.

I will also reiterate the recommendations to engage in regular stretching and muscle conditioning exercises if you have foot-related pain or disfunction.

Last edited by Brown Eyed Girl; 11-06-2010 at 11:33 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 11-06-2010, 12:10 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 28,527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
Cool! I do hope they help.

I will also reiterate the recommendations to engage in regular stretching and muscle conditioning exercises if you have foot-related pain or disfunction.
I've been dealing with this for about ten years off and on. Sometimes it just flares up, regardless of stretches. It's worse if I have to stand around (as when shopping) for extended periods.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 11-06-2010, 01:29 PM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
It's definitely not the weight -- I'm about 5'7 and weigh about 120 lbs. I can't get that much skinnier. But I've always had weak ankles, and now with the neuroma, ganglion, and hammertoes, I think its a certainty that my feet are just crap. And I'm 25, so its not like I'm ancient and these problems built up over time.
Ooo, you have my sympathy for weak ankles. No fun at all .

Brown Eyed Girl, just to reiterate, you found the Soles had higher arches than the berry superfeet, right? Have you tried any of the other Sole insoles, and what type of shoes do you use the Dean ones in (sneakers, work, etc). ((For anyone else interested, there are a ton of Amazon reviews for various Soles)).
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 11-06-2010, 01:44 PM
Caprese Caprese is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
It's definitely not the weight -- I'm about 5'7 and weigh about 120 lbs. I can't get that much skinnier. But I've always had weak ankles, and now with the neuroma, ganglion, and hammertoes, I think its a certainty that my feet are just crap. And I'm 25, so its not like I'm ancient and these problems built up over time.
I am the same height and weight as you but am more than twice your age, and like you I just kind of have crappy feet--I never got into high heels at all--I'm an old hippie--and have been wearing shoes with wide toe boxes all my life.
But my foot problem is bunions.
The custom-made orthotics that I got ten years ago ($300 with insurance) really, really helped me. Yes at first they sort of hurt, but that was the correction they were providing.
I completely wore them out a couple years ago.
My new insurance will not pay for orthotics, so I got some insole thingies at the podiatrist's, it looks like they resemble Superfeet.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 11-07-2010, 07:12 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindsaybluth View Post
Brown Eyed Girl, just to reiterate, you found the Soles had higher arches than the berry superfeet, right?
Yes, that is correct. I haven't measured the arch, and I don't have any specs, but the Soles do feel higher.
Quote:
Have you tried any of the other Sole insoles, and what type of shoes do you use the Dean ones in (sneakers, work, etc). ((For anyone else interested, there are a ton of Amazon reviews for various Soles)).
I have tried the Ed Viesturs Soles and the Dean Karnazes Soles. The Viesturs are very thick and are intended to be used in hiking boots. They can also be used in very high volume shoes, in order to achieve a more snug fit. Say, a casual boot that is too roomy. The Karnazes insoles are not quite as thick as the Viesturs, but they have some cushion in them and are designed for athletic activities in which foot flexibility and shock absorption is important. The grey Slim Series is even thinner and is appropriate for casual and very low volume shoes in which too much insole height will make the shoes too tight for comfort.

You can use the Karnazes or Viesturs ones in casual shoes as well, if that's what you prefer, as long as they don't crowd your feet. There are no rules for which one has to go in what type of shoe, other than picking the one that feels most comfortable and still allows your foot to fit in the shoe. (I know that doesn't help if you're ordering them online.)

If you have an REI nearby, you can try them out in the store. Bring your favorite shoes and walk around the store with the insoles in them to see how they feel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefguy
I've been dealing with this for about ten years off and on. Sometimes it just flares up, regardless of stretches. It's worse if I have to stand around (as when shopping) for extended periods.
Ah well, IANAP, but it sounds like fatigue to me. Better muscle conditioning leads to reduced fatigue, so I'd say it certainly doesn't hurt to keep up your exercises. But of course, if the orthotics help, no need fixing what ain't broke.

Standing around on concrete for extended periods of time is brutal on anyone. It's why I will only work in Chacos, Danskos, my hiking boots, or very good trail runner with medial posting. This is despite the fact that I comfortably run in FiveFingers and I have neutral arches with very mild pronation.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 11-07-2010, 08:07 PM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
You can use the Karnazes or Viesturs ones in casual shoes as well, if that's what you prefer, as long as they don't crowd your feet. There are no rules for which one has to go in what type of shoe, other than picking the one that feels most comfortable and still allows your foot to fit in the shoe. (I know that doesn't help if you're ordering them online.)

If you have an REI nearby, you can try them out in the store. Bring your favorite shoes and walk around the store with the insoles in them to see how they feel.
Ahh thank you. I'll go to my REI and try out all the Soles they have, and bring along the three pairs of shoes I need insoles in (anne klein loafers, topsiders, and gym sneakers). Sounds like I'll need two of the slim dress shoe ones and one of the Karnazes.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-30-2011, 06:40 PM
maxstein maxstein is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
$400 is a lot of money for orthotics. You can find custom orthotics online here starting at $89.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 12-31-2011, 09:24 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Since this zombie got resurrected, I'll add a bit of new information that may be useful for those contemplating arch support.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl View Post
Standing around on concrete for extended periods of time is brutal on anyone. It's why I will only work in Chacos, Danskos, my hiking boots, or very good trail runner with medial posting. This is despite the fact that I comfortably run in FiveFingers and I have neutral arches with very mild pronation.
After over a year of regular use of the Vibram FiveFingers (I now have 3 pair and wear them at least 80% of my walking moments), I have found that I am willing and able to wear VFFs while standing on concrete for extended periods of time without experiencing fatigue or discomfort. I never thought I'd say it, but it is quite possible to condition the body to accept little to no support regardless of what material someone walks/stands on. Actually, these days, I find my Chacos make my feet sore after only a few hours and I rarely wear my Danskos at all. Shame, too, because I really like the Chacos and I have 3 pair of those, too.

But I'm thrilled to have achieved a level of conditioning that makes me unreliant on any type of external arch support, despite the fact that I work on my feet.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.