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  #1  
Old 11-11-2010, 03:50 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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I'm dying for a cigarette

I started smoking in the 10th grade. 17 years later I quit; that was just this last July 4. While I have had one or two since then when out with my boys, I have otherwise not been smoking at all.

The last 6 months or so before July 4 I had managed to get myself down to just 1 a day, when I was waiting for the bus home after work. Then on Independence Day this year I declared my own independence from tobacco. I still kept an unopened pack on my dresser just because having it made me feel better. I would actually lose the urge to smoke if I could just pick up that pack and hold it for a minute; I would hold it and stare at it for a few minutes then put it down and go on with my day. Well I gave that pack away last week and now all I can think about is lighting one up. I'm not going to go out and buy another pack, I've certainly the willpower to resist going to even that small effort and that's a good thing I know, but dammit if someone were to offer me one right this moment I would take it in a heartbeat.

Nobody likes a quitter.
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  #2  
Old 11-11-2010, 03:54 PM
bup bup is offline
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And if you do smoke a cigarette, you still might be dying for it. You're screwed.
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  #3  
Old 11-11-2010, 04:25 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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Originally Posted by bup View Post
And if you do smoke a cigarette, you still might be dying for it. You're screwed.
Thanks. Feel much better now.
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  #4  
Old 11-11-2010, 05:24 PM
Rachellelogram Rachellelogram is offline
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And if I get cancer when I'm 80, I don't care
Who the hell wants to be 90 anyway?
With a hidey-lighty-lighty and a hidey-lighty-ay!

Congrats on doing whatever you want to do! If you want to smoke, more power to you. But if you want to stay quit, then I support that too.
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  #5  
Old 11-11-2010, 05:37 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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I'd always justified my smoking by reasoning that if one manages to live long enough cancer in one form or another is pretty much inevitable, so I might as well know the reason (whether that's technically correct or not). But I just wasn't enjoying it anymore; it eventually felt like a chore, so I quit. But dammit every now and then I just want one. Not gonna do it though. I promised myself and others, and I'm a man of my word.
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  #6  
Old 11-11-2010, 05:41 PM
Any Other Name Any Other Name is offline
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My story was the same, except I probably smoked for 25 years. I quit several times. The next to last time I convinced myself I could have one and not resume smoking. It was anther year before I quit again, and this time for good (9 years and counting).

You still have some psychological urgings. Fight them. You will regret it if you give in, and you will be glad if you persevere.

But you know all that. You've been a non-smoker for over four months. You're benefiting already from being a non-smoker. Good luck.
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  #7  
Old 11-11-2010, 05:47 PM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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Good for you for quitting! Congratulations
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  #8  
Old 11-11-2010, 05:52 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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Thanks.

Hi Opal!
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  #9  
Old 11-11-2010, 06:15 PM
Gukumatz Gukumatz is offline
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There's a counter program out there that lets you input how many cigarettes you're smoking and will show you how much money you're saving from day to day. It kind of puts the expense in perspective in a neat way. I'll try to dig up a link.
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  #10  
Old 11-11-2010, 06:26 PM
Morgenstern Morgenstern is online now
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Originally Posted by rachelellogram View Post
And if I get cancer when I'm 80, I don't care
Who the hell wants to be 90 anyway?
With a hidey-lighty-lighty and a hidey-lighty-ay!

Congrats on doing whatever you want to do! If you want to smoke, more power to you. But if you want to stay quit, then I support that too.
I watched my grandmother die from emphysema from smoking most of her life. I think cancer might be the better choice.
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  #11  
Old 11-11-2010, 07:01 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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I quit two and a half years ago, and I thought I could have the random cigarette now and then, but then when I did I would feel horribly nauseated and nasty inside. Then, the last time I tried to smoke, I threw up my just-eaten restaurant meal, and I'm pretty sure that will do me for life, now. I don't know if I just got used to the nastiness when I first started smoking, or if cigarettes are more full of vomit-inducing things now than they used to be, but that's pretty gross.

You certainly don't need a cigarette now, or ever again. Commit to it. You can do this!
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  #12  
Old 11-11-2010, 07:06 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is online now
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Originally Posted by rachelellogram View Post
And if I get cancer when I'm 80, I don't care
Who the hell wants to be 90 anyway?
With a hidey-lighty-lighty and a hidey-lighty-ay!
We work and we make cigarettes all hidey-lidey day,
So folks can get a breaky from their stressful lidey lives,
and relaxy with the cigarettes we make all day and night!
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  #13  
Old 11-11-2010, 07:29 PM
Khan Khan is offline
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I was told by one of my attendings, a family practice doc, that it takes smokers an average of 5 attempts to successfully quit. Whatever the numbers might be, it stands to reason that you'll have false starts. Your formula for success will be your very own, but here are two things I read on the Dope that helped me:

1.) You have to make multiple decisions before you smoke your next cigarette. You'll have to decide to go looking for one, whether you bum one or buy a new pack. You'll have to take the smoke into your possession when you find one. You'll have to find a light at some point during this process. Then you'll have to light up, and so on. When you break it down into steps, the decision isn't as simple as "smoke? Y/N." At the same time, you've given yourself a buffer, so it actually can be simpler to resist the cravings.

2.) Someone compared the time that's passed since their last smoke to earning equity. That analogy might work for you. I like to think of it as my high score, and I don't want to start the count over again*.

Hope that helps you too.

*Just for fun, I went and figured it out: 475 days since my last cigarette, 399 since my last lozenge.
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  #14  
Old 11-11-2010, 08:47 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Originally Posted by Morgenstern View Post
I watched my grandmother die from emphysema from smoking most of her life. I think cancer might be the better choice.
Lung cancer is not particularly lovely either. My aunt essentially drowned. Eventually.
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  #15  
Old 11-11-2010, 09:16 PM
Girl Hermit Girl Hermit is offline
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
Lung cancer is not particularly lovely either. My aunt essentially drowned. Eventually.
Agreed. Essentially drowning in your own blood is horrible for the person and truly horrifying for the family to have to watch.


I am a 30 year smoker and I quit September 2nd. I am a "no will power" and "easily addicted to almost anything" person so my theory is if I can do it than anyone can.

Good for you DCnDC and stick to it. You'll be happier, and healthier, in the long run.
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  #16  
Old 11-11-2010, 09:58 PM
Uncle Brother Walker Uncle Brother Walker is offline
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I quit over a year ago. As of late, I've been fighting the urge to smoke once again.

I remember, back in the day, the actor who played the "Equalizer" character was on the Johnny Carson show. He had quit smoking something like 20+ years ago and Johnny asked him about it. He said that he had the urge "every freaking day", or words to that effect. He just didn't smoke.

I'm not sure if that helps, but I just wanted to say that the recurring urge seems to be normal.

Let's both hang in there. I'm pretty sure I don't want to start smoking again, but the flesh seems to be weak.
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  #17  
Old 11-11-2010, 10:30 PM
brachyrhynchos brachyrhynchos is offline
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Smoked about 40 years and quit 22 Feb 2010. The previous time I quit was maybe 20 years ago, and it lasted 6 weeks.

God, those urges for a smoke felt like forever. But in reality, I'm thinking they last (at least the really strong parts) less than a minute. This realization, at least for me, has helped me stick with it. And the last few months have been better. I still get urges, but fewer than before.

Congrats to you all for stopping or for trying!
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brack·ee·rink·os - - - - - My Toxorhynchites- - - - -You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike
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  #18  
Old 11-11-2010, 10:42 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is online now
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My husband works on the locked dementia unit of the state veterans' home.

Most of the people on his floor don't know whether they're afoot or horseback. But because of patient's rights, if they smoked when they knew who they were, they're allowed to smoke now. Some of them can't even hold a cigarette. So the ward has what they call "smoking robots" -- essentially a hookah. The cig goes on a little plate, and there's a rubber tube that the person puts in his/her mouth to take a drag. Some of them fall asleep while they're smoking, even in this state-approved manner, so someone (hubby -- a lifelong nonsmoker who hates cig smoke -- among them) has to sit there and supervise while these people take 20 minutes to smoke their state-sanctioned-and-scheduled cigarette.

Would you like to end up as one of these old codgers?

---
You would think at a health care facility, they'd be able to say, "Hey, you know what? If someone's so far gone that they have to be moved to the locked dementia ward, guess what? They just quit smoking. Say hello to Mr. Patch." But for some reason that won't fly.
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  #19  
Old 11-12-2010, 08:19 AM
abderian abderian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Girl Hermit View Post
I am a 30 year smoker and I quit September 2nd. I am a "no will power" and "easily addicted to almost anything" person so my theory is if I can do it than anyone can.
Girl Hermit, as an "easily addicted to almost anything" person myself, I liked reading this. Can you tell me more? What got you to the point of quitting? How did you deal with breaking the addiction? What did you do that very first day? How are you doing now --- two months after the fact?
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  #20  
Old 11-12-2010, 10:47 AM
Rushgeekgirl Rushgeekgirl is offline
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If you smoke that cigarette, you'll only want another soon after. Best to just stay away completely.

That's what's kept me off the things for the past two and a half years, just knowing if I allow myself just one, it won't help.

You're doing great.
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  #21  
Old 11-12-2010, 11:01 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is online now
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I smoked for 17-1/2 years before I quit. That was 18-1/2 years ago. Quit all at once, the first time I tried. Picked a day and said from midnight there would be no more smoking. I must have smoked almost a pack between 11:30pm and midnight, looking constantly at my watch, making me slightly ill and probably helping put me off.

I used the nicotine gum, and it worked for me, although some people say they've not had much luck with that. A little rough at first, but I'm glad I stuck with it. I can be around smokers now and not even crave a cigarette. I think the trick is you really have to want to quit. I mean WANT to. At the time, I had recently learned about "pack years." A pack year is based on how many packs you smoke in a day per yer. For example, if you smoke one pack a day, in one year you've done a pack year; if you smoke two packs a day, then you've done two pack years in one calendar year. I read that statistics show truly irreversible damage seems to start occuring after 20 pack years, and looking back I figured I was about at that.

I have never regretted my decision to stop smoking. Food tasted the same really, it did not taste better like many people say. But it was good to be off of that. And no more expense!

Don't do it. Don't pick up that cigarette. And if you truly are ready to stop, you won't. If it turns out you're not truly ready yet, don't kick yourself too much.
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  #22  
Old 11-12-2010, 12:59 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Any Other Name View Post
...You still have some psychological urgings. Fight them. You will regret it if you give in, and you will be glad if you persevere....
Absolutely. Absolutely! Be strong, keep your chin up, and know that we're pulling for you too. Odds are you'll be far healthier, live far longer, be far happier and save far more by not smoking. Not to mention all your friends and family who love you and don't want to see you die in pain.
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  #23  
Old 11-12-2010, 01:30 PM
Meme Chose Meme Chose is offline
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As one of my friends puts it--if you have a craving and smoke a cigarette, the craving will be gone in 10 minutes. However, if you DON'T smoke, the craving will still be gone in 10 minutes. Just hang in there for 11 minutes.
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  #24  
Old 11-13-2010, 10:06 AM
Serenata67 Serenata67 is offline
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I've been going through that. I quit earlier this year because my husband and I decided to start trying for a family. But lately I've been really stressed out... and I'd love to light one up and kick back. But I can't. No. But I want to soooooo bad.
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  #25  
Old 11-13-2010, 10:42 AM
Taters Taters is offline
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I had my last (I hope) cigarette on October 3rd 2010, at 7:30. I'm doing it cold turkey this time. I haven't had a single smoke since then.

I've quit for a while in the past, but always picked the habit up. The longest time I'd quit was when I was pregnant. Both times, the minute I suspected I was pregnant, I put down the cigarettes and didn't light up until well after both kids were born. I didn't really miss smoking at all then. I'd get back to work after maternity leave, get stressed, and pick the habit up again.

Over the course of the years, I'd quit for a few months, then go back to smoking.
I tried cold turkey, patches, gum. I'd be fine, then I'd have that "one" cigarette and two weeks later, I was back to my old habit.

This time, the motivating factor for me is cost. My husband quit the same time as me. We figure we're saving around $500.00 a month. Cigarettes are over eight dollars a pack here. You figure a pack a day for each of us (not that I smoke them all, but I always had a pack), and that's a lot of moolah that could be better put to use elsewhere.

I still have a craving, but the cigarettes I miss the most are the after work cigarette and the after dinner cigarette with my husband.

Hang in there everyone who is trying to quit. I'm right there with you! Congrats to all of you have managed to quit for good.
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  #26  
Old 11-13-2010, 06:41 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is online now
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Originally Posted by Taters View Post
This time, the motivating factor for me is cost. My husband quit the same time as me. We figure we're saving around $500.00 a month. Cigarettes are over eight dollars a pack here. You figure a pack a day for each of us (not that I smoke them all, but I always had a pack), and that's a lot of moolah that could be better put to use elsewhere.
Damn. I can remember being outraged when they went up to a buck.
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  #27  
Old 11-14-2010, 11:44 PM
Girl Hermit Girl Hermit is offline
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Originally Posted by Portwest View Post
Girl Hermit, as an "easily addicted to almost anything" person myself, I liked reading this. Can you tell me more? What got you to the point of quitting? How did you deal with breaking the addiction? What did you do that very first day? How are you doing now --- two months after the fact?
Sorry, my internet service died (again) for two days and I just saw this.

What got me to the point of quitting? I couldn't breathe anymore after carrying the garbage can from the garage (near the back of the house) to the end of the driveway at the front of the house. Along with my Aunt's boyfriend dying in April at age 49 from lung cancer - a single dad with three kids left behind (although now in her care and much loved). Adding up too was the death of my FIL from smoking related cancer 7 years ago, a friend of the family who was like family dying from lung cancer 2 years ago and my father having his 4th heart attack in May. Accumulation of things, really but the truly not being able to breathe was scary to me in a "oh, it could actually happen to ME!" way.

Actually quitting was a process for me. I kept track for a week on a piece of paper exactly how many cigarettes I was smoking. Then I put that number of cigarettes in a container and I could only smoke the ones out of there. Every week I cut down by one (at least). Until I got down to three.

Then I went to my doctor and asked him for anti-anxiety drugs because thinking about quitting would sadly have me in a full blown panic attack. And he suggested I try Zyban instead. Zyban was originally marketed as Wellbutrin, an anti-depressant but was found to have possible use in helping smokers with their cravings. They also make cigarettes taste like crappy, chemically, disgusting, makes you want to barf things. That helped.

I also used Nicorette lozenges for a bit. They helped big time. You can get gum too. Believe it or not, neither is terrible. Different tasting - it's not exactly mint but it's minty-ish and it's not bad at all (I actually like the taste but that may be a mind thing - they do have nicotine in them after all).

The biggest piece of advice I can give is to change the routines you associated with smoking. If you got ready in the bathroom and smoked then go buy a mirror for the bedroom and get ready there. If you smoked while driving to/from work - find a new route or a few new routes, even if it takes you longer! Sit in a new chair to watch TV or even rearrange your furniture. Do all the dishes and clean the kitchn thouroughly if you are an "after eating" smoker (like me - my kitchen is so clean now!) Personally I only ever smoked outside so I made Mr Hermit and The Niece take the dog in and out and I only went in and out the front door (where I rarely had smoked) and just stayed right the hell out of the backyard for a month!

Stay with it and read this thread over and over. Lots of different things people have listed above. Everyone is different and different things work for different people so don't give up. Just try something else and know you can do it!
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  #28  
Old 11-15-2010, 01:12 AM
Arrendajo Arrendajo is offline
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What's the big deal? Quitting is easy. I've done it hundreds of times.
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  #29  
Old 11-15-2010, 10:29 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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I had a meeting with my lawyer this morning about a pressing matter in my life and it went well. I rewarded myself with a sushi lunch and a smoke. Sorry to let anyone down, but I felt like I earned it. I think I'm done until New Years at least, though. I'll give away the rest of the pack I bought to my friends for past bums and future debits.
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