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  #1  
Old 12-28-2010, 01:04 PM
Blut Aus Nord Blut Aus Nord is offline
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Scientific research of food grade diatomaceous earth?

I've just discovered diatomaceous earth, a sort of wonder "food" that supposedly treats a wide variety of health problems. Here's one website that stocks it, along with further information:

http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/di...human_use.html

Still, as with any strange medicine or food, I would like to see multiple studies that conclusively demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the product. I can't seem to find much other than anecdotes and speculation. Does anyone know anything about this stuff?

Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 12-28-2010, 01:43 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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I use it for pest control.

Here's what I know: the powder is made of tiny silica particls, which are extremely rough and pointy in a microscopic way. So when any hard-shelled insect (flea, roach, beetle etc.) walks through it, they get teensy-tiny openings in their exoskeleton and eventually they dehydrate. This is why you should not breathe it in or get it in your eyes, though it won't hurt your skin besides drying the shit out of it.

What I've read - but am not certain about - is that it's often used internally for livestock and such. Added to the animal's food, it affects (supposedly? anyone wanna chime in here?) internal parasites such as worms in the same manner.


General rule of thumb with anything that smacks of woo-woo: the more conditions (and the more disparate they are) that it claims to cure, the less likely it is to work. Helps soften skin while reducing the appearance of spots? Sure, maybe. Softens skin, gets rid of wrinkles, cures cancer, promotes liver health and fights AIDS? Prolly not.
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  #3  
Old 12-28-2010, 02:01 PM
Jenaroph Jenaroph is offline
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Well, who wouldn't trust a web site with animated wolves all over it?

Can't find any research regarding human consumption of diatomaceous earth, but lord, that site reads like BS to me. The word "detox" is a big red flag, before even reading further.

Quote:
Additionally, any larger parasites that happen to be in the stomach or digestive tract are "cut up" and killed by the sharp edges of the DE.
Quote:
DE is very hard. On the hardness scale diamonds are a 9, DE is a 7. This is very important, because as those millions of tiny hard and sharp D E cylinders pass through the small and large intestines, they "scrub" the walls (Note they do not harm the intestinal wall).
So, the stuff slices and dices parasites, but magically doesn't harm your intestines. Uh huh.
Quote:
After only a few months of taking Diatomaceous Earth, the intestine wall is no longer coated with mucus, gunk, and molds!
Guess what. You WANT mucus lining your intestines. That is what lubricates the poop as it slides through, to be graphic.
Quote:
Some people do notice funny, strange, or gross things in their bowel movements. Some choose to look and others don't want to know.
Sure, you're getting gross stuff in your poop; it's because you're eating one of the absorbent components of cat litter.

Contrary to what a disturbing number of people selling this kind of stuff (and I mean other "detoxing" supplements besides this one as well) want you to think, the walls of your colon do not get coated with toxic sludge. When someone truly has an intestinal blockage, it's in the center (lumen) of the pipe, and anything that does get through is squeezing by on the sides, because stuff doesn't stick to the walls, which are coated with mucus. Any "gross stuff" that you crap out is there because of the supplement, not because the supplement is cleaning out gunk that was already there.

The best thing you can say about this kind of thing is that it probably won't actively hurt you, but it's not a magic pill that will solve every medical problem from arthritis to cancer.
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  #4  
Old 12-28-2010, 02:09 PM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Originally Posted by Jenaroph View Post
So, the stuff slices and dices parasites, but magically doesn't harm your intestines. Uh huh.
My thoughts exactly. Stay away from this stuff.
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  #5  
Old 12-28-2010, 02:38 PM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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It's a non-chemical pest control. It works great for that purpose, and if ingested in pretty small quantities, well, it hasn't killed us yet.

We use it lightly dusted throughout our grains, flour, and pasta which are stored for long periods of time to kill the little bug eggs and baby bugs that eventually infest those foods - I'd rather eat a few crushed-up microscopic shells than eat bugs - and in the case of the grains and pasta, we rinse them before preparing them to eat in order to diminish the DO that we're ingesting.

We also use it thickly dusted under our houses and barns to combat termites and in our yard to combat fire ants.

I sure as hell wouldn't go eating the stuff as a supplement - why would you need to?

Most residents of the USA don't have parasites as a general health concern (usually one notices parasites, and most parasites come from unclean drinking water, which most USA residents don't have to worry about), and DO won't do anything to your bacteria. I also don't believe (I don't have a cite, sorry) that DO is as effective when it's wet, so once inside you, I have a hard time believing it would do much more than bind up with your food and pass on through your GI tract.

At the worst (which if you're eating a shitload of it, could happen) it's going to sandpaper away your GI lining, and then you have ulcers and infections and irritations galore, which will make you significantly less happy than you would be otherwise.

Save this one to kill bugs with, and you're in good company. Eat it, and that's getting into weird territory.
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  #6  
Old 12-28-2010, 02:38 PM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
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Originally Posted by Jenaroph View Post
The best thing you can say about this kind of thing is that it probably won't actively hurt you[...]
After reading the rest of your post, I'm not sure at all that this is true.
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  #7  
Old 12-28-2010, 02:53 PM
mozchron mozchron is offline
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You do eat this stuff all the time. its commonly used to keep stored product pests out of stored grains etc...

Its used orally in veterinary treatment (usually large animals - horses etc) as an antiparasitic. Some people take it as a supplement for the same reason.

My (admittedly cursory) Pubmed search doesn't turn up any controlled studies looking at human ingestion of the stuff. Its probably harmless in reasonable doses. Don't know what larger amounts would do. It wouldn't poison you - the stuff is inert - but I wonder if it would cause some sort of physical damage. My guess is it would come out the other end pretty much in the same state in went in.

Now, non-food grade DE can be nasty stuff - the crystals are much larger and cause damage. Don't eat/inhale it!
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  #8  
Old 12-28-2010, 05:35 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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After some search using Google Scholar, I can find no research as regards the medical uses of diatomaceous earth by humans consuming it. I would say then that the "cites" give by the OP are mostly "woo".

It does have many uses to filter stuff and some uses for pest control:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...a&searchtype=a

I agree with Jenaroph.
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2010, 05:43 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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As long as we're here ... anyone feel like weighing in on the claim in the OP's link that humans need to ingest silica?

"Silica is the most plentiful element on earth, following oxygen; but there are very few foods that contain an adequate amount to supply the quantity your body needs..."

What's the straight dope on that aspect?
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2010, 05:51 PM
mozchron mozchron is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
As long as we're here ... anyone feel like weighing in on the claim in the OP's link that humans need to ingest silica?

"Silica is the most plentiful element on earth, following oxygen; but there are very few foods that contain an adequate amount to supply the quantity your body needs..."

What's the straight dope on that aspect?
First off, SIlica is not an element. Silicon is an element, but you need, at most, trace amounts of it and no one suffers from a silicon deficiency.

Silica is vernacular for silicon dioxide. Other names foe silicon dioxide include sand, and glass. Any takers on bets for how much glass is required for normal healthy biological functioning? Anyone?

i.e., none. The claim is woo.
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  #11  
Old 12-28-2010, 05:52 PM
Napier Napier is offline
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The idea of using it as a nutritional supplement sounds pretty goofy to me. I know of diatomite or DE from its use in liquid filtration. It is so easy to filter out of water that it actually makes it easier to filter out other things, if you add some.

It is little mineral skeletons of tiny sea creatures, and has the form of beautiful lacy flakes or shells. This makes it form fluffy and permeable "cake" on the surface of a filter, yet gives it an effective small pore size.

As far as I know, the only reason they give it to livestock is that they use it as filter precoat and body feed when filtering things like fruit juice, that otherwise form a slimy and difficult filter cake that quickly plugs the filter. This cake is nutritious because of the fruit pulp and slime. The diatomite is collateral damage, so to speak. Together they form a possible cattle feed, or else maybe compost or industrial waste.

As I understand it, the reason it kills insects is that its tiny sharp edges get caught in insect joints and scrape up the smooth, close-fitting surfaces there. It's like getting sand in gears and spoiling them. This interferes with joint motion and maybe makes the insect leak body fluids. It wouldn't work on worms, which have flexible skins rather than hard shells with joints.
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  #12  
Old 12-28-2010, 05:55 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
As long as we're here ... anyone feel like weighing in on the claim in the OP's link that humans need to ingest silica?

"Silica is the most plentiful element on earth, following oxygen; but there are very few foods that contain an adequate amount to supply the quantity your body needs..."

What's the straight dope on that aspect?
Your body does not seem to need Silicon in any significant amounts, there does not seem to be any need to supplement your diet to add Silicon.


wiki "Although silicon was proposed to be a ultra trace nutrition its exact function in the biology of animals is still under discussion."


http://www.fasebj.org/content/5/12/2661.abstract
"Nutritional requirements for boron, silicon, vanadium, nickel, and arsenic: current knowledge and speculation...Based on these findings and the response of animals and/or humans to low intakes of these elements, the following speculations have been presented: .... 2) Silicon is necessary for the association between cells and one or more macromolecules such as osteonectin, which affects cartilage composition and ultimately cartilage calcification. 3..... If any of these speculations are found to be true, the element involved will be firmly established as having a nutritional requirement because the body obviously cannot synthesize it. Based on animal findings, the dietary requirement is likely to be small; that is, expressed in micrograms per day. " (italics mine)

http://www.ajcn.org/content/75/5/887.abstract

"Background: Increasing evidence suggests that silicon is important in bone formation. The main source of silicon for humans is the diet, but the bioavailability of silicon from solid foods is not well understood.

Objective: We estimated the dietary intake of silicon by adults, separately for men and women and for different age groups. Foods that were major contributors to silicon intake were identified. We then estimated the gastrointestinal uptake of silicon from major food sources and studied how uptake correlated with the silicon contents of the foods.

....
Results: Mean silicon intakes in men (30 and 33 mg/d in the original Framingham and Framingham Offspring cohorts, respectively) were significantly higher than those in women (24 and 25 mg/d in the 2 cohorts, respectively; P = 0.0001). Silicon intake decreased with age (P < 0.001, adjusted for sex). The major food sources were beer and bananas in men and bananas and string beans in women. Silicon was readily available from foods; a mean of 41% of the ingested silicon was excreted in urine. The silicon content of the foods consumed was significantly correlated with urinary silicon excretion (P = 0.019).

Conclusions: Solid foods are a major source of available silicon. The association between dietary silicon intake and bone health should now be investigated. "

Not that a extra bannana a day would be a bad idea.
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  #13  
Old 12-28-2010, 05:59 PM
mozchron mozchron is offline
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post

"Background: Increasing evidence suggests that silicon is important in bone formation. The main source of silicon for humans is the diet, but the bioavailability of silicon from solid foods is not well understood...The major food sources were beer and bananas in men...

Not that a extra bannana a day would be a bad idea.
Screw the bananas. One more excuse to drink beer!

"but honey, I haven't had my daily silicon supplement today!"
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  #14  
Old 12-28-2010, 06:02 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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Originally Posted by mozchron View Post
Screw the bananas. One more excuse to drink beer!

"but honey, I haven't had my daily silicon supplement today!"
Good point. Hell, you can almost survive on Guiness anyway.
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  #15  
Old 12-28-2010, 06:11 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by mozchron View Post
First off, SIlica is not an element. Silicon is an element, but you need, at most, trace amounts of it and no one suffers from a silicon deficiency.

Silica is vernacular for silicon dioxide. Other names foe silicon dioxide include sand, and glass...


I mix those two up easily. Thanks. Figured someone might be lurking in the thread and I wanted to get that part cleared up, since it's the only part of the site (admittedly, I skimmed) that didn't jump out at me immediately as being natural!! safe!! it'll make your coat shiny!! and clear out bad fats from your blood!! and get rid of acne!!
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  #16  
Old 12-28-2010, 06:22 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by Napier View Post
...

As I understand it, the reason it kills insects is that its tiny sharp edges get caught in insect joints and scrape up the smooth, close-fitting surfaces there. It's like getting sand in gears and spoiling them. This interferes with joint motion and maybe makes the insect leak body fluids. It wouldn't work on worms, which have flexible skins rather than hard shells with joints.
Devil's advocate: wouldn't intestinal parasites such as those vague and unnamed "worms" the wolf site is going on about have to have some sort of tough outer coating, at least, to survive life in a mammalian digestive tract?

(Sorry to keep flogging another woo thread. I like to know the gritty details and this seemed like the right place to learn. Next time this comes up in a conversation for me I might not have such a resource handy, and I do know a few people who fall for whatever the latest supplement craze has become.)
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  #17  
Old 12-28-2010, 08:00 PM
needscoffee needscoffee is offline
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How about silicone? How much silicone does a body need? I hear that in Southern California, the amount per capita is much higher than in other areas of the country.
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  #18  
Old 12-28-2010, 08:14 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
As long as we're here ... anyone feel like weighing in on the claim in the OP's link that humans need to ingest silica?

"Silica is the most plentiful element on earth, following oxygen; but there are very few foods that contain an adequate amount to supply the quantity your body needs..."

What's the straight dope on that aspect?
Quote:
Originally Posted by mozchron View Post
First off, SIlica is not an element. Silicon is an element, but you need, at most, trace amounts of it and no one suffers from a silicon deficiency.

Silica is vernacular for silicon dioxide. Other names foe silicon dioxide include sand, and glass. Any takers on bets for how much glass is required for normal healthy biological functioning? Anyone?

i.e., none. The claim is woo.
Not to mention you get plenty of silica from ordinary plant foods, as it's a common component of vegetables and so forth. So eat your vegetables just like mama told you to.
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Old 12-28-2010, 08:55 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Devil's advocate: wouldn't intestinal parasites such as those vague and unnamed "worms" the wolf site is going on about have to have some sort of tough outer coating, at least, to survive life in a mammalian digestive tract?
Nah, pinworms are squishy, but their eggs survive the trip through the stomach and hatch in the intestine.
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  #20  
Old 12-28-2010, 09:20 PM
Blut Aus Nord Blut Aus Nord is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
(Sorry to keep flogging another woo thread. I like to know the gritty details and this seemed like the right place to learn. Next time this comes up in a conversation for me I might not have such a resource handy, and I do know a few people who fall for whatever the latest supplement craze has become.)
If you're insinuating that I, the TC, "fell" for anything, then I'm sorry to have given that impression. I'm fully aware of the far-fetched nature of the claims behind DE, and of the laughable web design in the link I posted, but it is always possible that I missed something in my search for any scientific backing.

I came across this stuff when a bunch of friends gave me wild anecdotes related to it, such as weight loss, lighter periods, improved sleep, etc. No one seems to have found any experimental evidence to support these claims, so I'm still not convinced.
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  #21  
Old 12-28-2010, 09:47 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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Originally Posted by Blut Aus Nord View Post
If you're insinuating that I, the TC, "fell" for anything, then I'm sorry to have given that impression. I'm fully aware of the far-fetched nature of the claims behind DE, and of the laughable web design in the link I posted, but it is always possible that I missed something in my search for any scientific backing.

I came across this stuff when a bunch of friends gave me wild anecdotes related to it, such as weight loss, lighter periods, improved sleep, etc. No one seems to have found any experimental evidence to support these claims, so I'm still not convinced.
Sure, it's woo-woo, but you came to the right place, your suspicious were well founded- thanks!
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  #22  
Old 04-04-2012, 09:50 AM
1ofaKinder 1ofaKinder is offline
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More info source on DE

Yes, friends.

There appears to be little research going on re: Diatomaceous Earth 'Food Grade'

I heard about it from a Christian missionary friend of my spouse. But I remember it in a message you can find on youtube. It is about 57 minutes into the message, but I believe you will find the whole message very thought provoking as well as informative and you will also find additional places to find out more information about diatoms and their deposit locations. The link is: [link redacted by moderator] You may also search further on the speaker Kent Hovind. Lompoc, CA has 100 years of mining it in their history: [link redacted by moderator] A 6 min testimonial with instructions on how to take it:[link redacted by moderator]

A very informative commercial on silica is viewable here:[link redacted by moderator] and while the viewer may not ever purchase, the why behind the product is fascinating to watch.


I have tried DE because of cleaning solvents I have been around all of my vocational career. I have tried it for a couple of weeks in fruit juice and distilled water and discontinued it for my fear of deposits accumulating in my body. But I intend to resume at some point because I sense a genuine need to detoxify multiple years of large build up of chemicals and heavy metals as a result of my vocation and the poor quality of American foods now available due to genetic ill-producing modifications, and other pollution exposure.

I hope this is helpful and will myself be continuing to look for research and studies on DE.

1oaK.

Last edited by Gary Robson; 04-04-2012 at 04:14 PM.. Reason: Spam links redacted
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  #23  
Old 04-04-2012, 10:13 AM
naita naita is offline
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Originally Posted by 1ofaKinder View Post
Yes, friends.
I have tried DE because of cleaning solvents I have been around all of my vocational career. I have tried it for a couple of weeks in fruit juice and distilled water and discontinued it for my fear of deposits accumulating in my body. But I intend to resume at some point because I sense a genuine need to detoxify multiple years of large build up of chemicals and heavy metals as a result of my vocation and the poor quality of American foods now available due to genetic ill-producing modifications, and other pollution exposure.

I hope this is helpful and will myself be continuing to look for research and studies on DE.

1oaK.
I hope you'll forgive me for not finding creationist tax-frauds a convincing source of information. Also, if your vocation has exposed you to bio-accumulating chemicals and heavy metals, eating sand is not going to rid you of them.

ETA: Unless you are a zombie. I think their digestion works differently from ours.

Last edited by naita; 04-04-2012 at 10:14 AM..
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  #24  
Old 04-04-2012, 11:10 AM
Jaymosch Jaymosch is offline
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Originally Posted by 1ofaKinder View Post
I have tried DE because of cleaning solvents I have been around all of my vocational career. I have tried it for a couple of weeks in fruit juice and distilled water and discontinued it for my fear of deposits accumulating in my body. But I intend to resume at some point because I sense a genuine need to detoxify multiple years of large build up of chemicals and heavy metals as a result of my vocation and the poor quality of American foods now available due to genetic ill-producing modifications, and other pollution exposure.
How would having DE, which pretty much amounts to sand, going through your digestive tract remove chemicals and heavy metals from your body?
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:39 AM
kunilou kunilou is online now
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Originally Posted by 1ofaKinder View Post
You may also search further on the speaker Kent Hovind.
A young-earth creationist whose positions have been criticized even by other young-earth creationists? That isn't exactly the best argument for eating silicon dioxide.
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  #26  
Old 04-04-2012, 02:18 PM
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Heh. I was about to post a warning based on another DE thread we had around here a while ago. It was started by a True Believer, who got thoroughly crushed and debunked to death, and then resurrected by at least three more over the next year or so, only to go through the same old arguments again and again. I was going to suggest something similar might happen here. Looks like I'm too late again.
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:13 PM
Gary Robson Gary Robson is offline
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Moderating: Spammer banned - carry on

[moderating]
I have banned the spammer, but since there are so many replies, I just redacted the links and left the original post there.
[/moderating]
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  #28  
Old 04-04-2012, 04:59 PM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Originally Posted by Lasciel View Post
It's a non-chemical pest control.
No it isn't. Silica is a chemical. Everything is a chemical.
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  #29  
Old 04-04-2012, 05:37 PM
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No it isn't. Silica is a chemical. Everything is a chemical.
You're kidding. Silicon dioxide is a chemical? God, they're EVERYWHERE.
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  #30  
Old 04-04-2012, 06:23 PM
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My dad started taking this stuff several months ago. A few days ago while in the emergency room, he learned he had four kidney stones, two in each kidney. I'm not saying that the DE caused them, but it scared him enough to stop taking it.
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  #31  
Old 04-05-2012, 10:46 AM
Testy Testy is offline
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Does anyone know the difference between food grade and non food grade DE? I want to use it to keep parasites off my chickens but don't see why I need food grade DE for this.

Thanks

Testy
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  #32  
Old 04-05-2012, 11:35 AM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Are you even able to find non-food-grade DE? Or ... is that the stuff you get at the pool supply store for filtration? (Is it that much cheaper?)
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  #33  
Old 04-05-2012, 11:40 AM
Testy Testy is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Are you even able to find non-food-grade DE? Or ... is that the stuff you get at the pool supply store for filtration? (Is it that much cheaper?)
purplehorse

I have no idea. My wife just mentioned that we needed some "food grade DE" for the chicken house and my immediate thought was "Why food grade to kill bugs with?" Not really sure if there is non food grade but if there is, it should cost less.

Regards

Testy
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  #34  
Old 04-05-2012, 11:55 AM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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No it isn't. Silica is a chemical. Everything is a chemical.
Thank you, captain obvious. In the context of the original post, I was trying to indicate that it was a pest-control device that works mechanically, not through chemical reactions. In other words, it kills bugs not by poisoning them, but by slicing holes in their outsides, rendering them somewhat soon after dead by dehydration.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Testy View Post
Does anyone know the difference between food grade and non food grade DE? I want to use it to keep parasites off my chickens but don't see why I need food grade DE for this.

Thanks

Testy
From what I have been able to tell, food grade DE is the following: freshwater diatoms (rather than salt-water), more finely ground than pool grade (smaller-finer cutting edges), isn't heat-treated (leaving it a powder instead of caking into larger solid chunks) and is more consistently silica-only (instead of having other clay or sediment involved as filler).

This link is from a provider of food-grade DE, but it's the least "woo" I could find. The Wiki article is fairly straightforward also.
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  #35  
Old 04-05-2012, 12:24 PM
Testy Testy is offline
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Originally Posted by Lasciel View Post
Thank you, captain obvious. In the context of the original post, I was trying to indicate that it was a pest-control device that works mechanically, not through chemical reactions. In other words, it kills bugs not by poisoning them, but by slicing holes in their outsides, rendering them somewhat soon after dead by dehydration.





From what I have been able to tell, food grade DE is the following: freshwater diatoms (rather than salt-water), more finely ground than pool grade (smaller-finer cutting edges), isn't heat-treated (leaving it a powder instead of caking into larger solid chunks) and is more consistently silica-only (instead of having other clay or sediment involved as filler).

This link is from a provider of food-grade DE, but it's the least "woo" I could find. The Wiki article is fairly straightforward also.
Lasciel

Thanks for this. I hadn't read up on the amorphous vs crystalline versions of this. I guess I'll just get the food grade stuff.

Thanks again

Testy
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  #36  
Old 04-05-2012, 03:17 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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My thanks as well. I tried searching around for explanations of the difference, and the wiki article - while thorough on the general matter - didn't explain the exact details (to me, at least) well enough for me to sum it up succinctly like that.

Hey, testy - are you talking about external or internal parasites on your chickens?
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:23 PM
Testy Testy is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
My thanks as well. I tried searching around for explanations of the difference, and the wiki article - while thorough on the general matter - didn't explain the exact details (to me, at least) well enough for me to sum it up succinctly like that.

Hey, testy - are you talking about external or internal parasites on your chickens?
purplehorseshoe

External. If I understood correctly, we scatter it around the chicken house and it kills mites. (Possibly fleas or some other kind of bug) The web sites I saw about using it for internal parasites seemed iffy at best. In any event, I don't think the chickens have internal parasites.

Regards

Testy
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  #38  
Old 04-25-2012, 12:28 PM
aliasa123 aliasa123 is offline
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Food grade DE is not chemically treated, that's the main difference. If you are going to put it into your body, or your pet's body, near your food that you are growing, you don't want chemicals in it.
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  #39  
Old 12-27-2012, 11:48 AM
Hawke Hawke is offline
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Non food grade DE

Quote:
Originally Posted by Testy View Post
Does anyone know the difference between food grade and non food grade DE? I want to use it to keep parasites off my chickens but don't see why I need food grade DE for this.

Thanks

Testy
The non food grade is deadly to animals and people and used in swimming pool chemicals. Stay away from it, dangerous.
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  #40  
Old 12-27-2012, 12:08 PM
Hawke Hawke is offline
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Food Grade diatomaceous earth

Hi, I new to this sight have had found several website regarding DE. I got very sick first part of November and was on different (6) different medications including steroids to no avail. My neighbor told me about DE so ordered some right away.

I have read more negative comments about DE than positive. After taking DE for a week started feeling better (this was first part of December). I take a tsp three times a day will no ill effects and feel wonderful and even use it with my toothpaste when brushing my teeth. Wow, great tarter remover.

I have been giving it to my dogs/cats, their coats are shinier, soft and they have so much more energy and seem happier.

Some is absorbed into the bloodstream and cleans out your arteries, they claim, guess I will not know that until I have another test done.

It is not a chemical yet a mineral and when you buy Food Grade it has other minerals also that are beneficial.

It kills all kinds of pests so be careful you do not want to lose the beneficial ones. I have forwarded some questions to one website with additional questions and will post them with the responses when I get them.

Most sites I have read state you really cannot overdose on this stuff yet certainly will not take more than two tablespoons a day. I could go on and on yet this is my opinion only that it is great stuff. Going to start some of my horses, I have 13, on it then compare results with the other worm medicines I do not like giving to my horses.

I hope everyone really check out all the websites that have Food Grade DE, you can believe them or not, your chose. God Bless and Happy New Year.
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  #41  
Old 12-27-2012, 01:29 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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Diatomaceous Earth is just a form of clay made up of the exoskeletons of diatoms, little sea creatures. Silica, sand, that is all it is.

It has the same nutritional properties as ordinary sand does, meaning none at all. If your dogs and cats coats seem shinier and the animals are happier you are imagining this.

DE kills garden pests, worms and insects because the little exoskeletons are just like little pieces of ground glass and poke holes in the pest's bodies.
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  #42  
Old 12-27-2012, 02:03 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallas Jones View Post
DE kills garden pests, worms and insects because the little exoskeletons are just like little pieces of ground glass and poke holes in the pest's bodies.
It also does that to your body. You just have a lot more body to spare. It's very hazardous to inhale, just like any abrasive material. It is very absorbent, so ingesting it may have the same utility as eating other absorbent substances such as those in Kaopectate and Pepto-Bismol.

Last edited by TriPolar; 12-27-2012 at 02:03 PM..
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  #43  
Old 02-11-2013, 10:26 PM
orundum orundum is offline
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Hi. Here's a totally legitimate article about feeding diatomaceous earth to chickens. Believe it or not, they actually found it to be beneficial:

http://ps.fass.org/content/90/7/1416.long

I also have a link for one more older article. They fed DE to pigs, chickens, and cows and found that it had no effect:

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/40026175.pdf
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  #44  
Old 04-04-2013, 03:37 PM
dogfaceboy dogfaceboy is offline
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it lowers cholesterol

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9533930
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  #45  
Old 04-04-2013, 04:13 PM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is online now
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From the link to that 15-year-old publication (there don't seem to be any newer studies cited in PubMed)*:

"Placebo-controlled studies will be necessary to confirm our findings."

Oh, and if it hasn't already been pointed out - "food grade" doesn't mean "safe to ingest on a continuing basis". There is currently a woo craze for "food grade" concentrated hydrogen peroxide, which is supposed to be good for pretty much whatever ails you. Boosters have failed to notice that "food grade" hydrogen peroxide means it is approved to use for cleaning food processing equipment, NOT for drinking.

*probably because the Giant Pharma Lizards Don't Want You To Know.
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  #46  
Old 04-04-2013, 09:18 PM
morgensd morgensd is offline
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DE is on the FDA's Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) list. In other words companies have been putting it in food for a long time before FDA thought to ask whether its dangerous. Nobody has died yet ( that we know of) so it's probably ok.

According to the FDA, daily consumption of the predominant form of silicate is 0.3 mg/kg per day. It sounds like these web sites are advocating much larger doses but given that people haven't been keeling over left and right, I'm guessing that the quantities proposed aren't acutely toxic. Silicates are found large quantities in OTC drugs like Kaolin as well.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsP.../ucm261274.htm

A few years ago these folks woulda been diagnosed with pica. Now they're on the cutting edge of...whatever you wanna call this. Personally speaking, I'll take a good steak over sandblasting my alimentary canal.


morgensd
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  #47  
Old 04-05-2013, 09:00 AM
Melbourne Melbourne is offline
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Also good for making Dynamite. Does your stomach need stablising to prvent it going off accidentally?
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  #48  
Old 04-05-2013, 09:08 AM
DrFidelius DrFidelius is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melbourne View Post
Also good for making Dynamite. Does your stomach need stablising to prvent it going off accidentally?
Only after All-You-Can-Eat burrito night.
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  #49  
Old 04-05-2013, 09:27 AM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is online now
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My exwife grew up in a dirt poor community of central Mississippi. She tells me they ued to eat red dirt, she couldn't remember how her mother fixed it but it was in a soup like mix. I have to wonder if they did not use that as a parasite control of some kind.
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  #50  
Old 10-25-2013, 11:23 AM
HootieMcGrudy HootieMcGrudy is offline
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Peer reviewed DE study on cholesterol

Eur. J. Med. Res. 1998 Apr 8;3(4):211-5

Diatomaceous earth lowers blood cholesterol concentrations.

In this study 19 healthy individuals with mild hypercholesterolemia were studied during a 12 week period. Serum lipid levels were measured before the study and every two weeks. The lipids measured included cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Results showed that Diatomaceous Earth intake was associated with a significant reduction of serum cholesterol compared to baseline (285.8 +/- 37.5 mg/dl = 7.40 +/- 0.97 mM) vs (248.1 mg/dl = 6.43 mM, -13.2% from baseline; p<0.001) at week 6.

Conclusions state that Diatomaceous Earth is capable of reducing blood cholesterol and positively influencing lipid metabolism in humans.

Here is the pubmed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9533930

Crystilline silica is the one that is dangerous if inhaled. High quality food grade DE is typically less than 1% crystilline silica and the rest is amorphous silica.

I love how people on this board jump all over anything natural and immediately dismiss it as ignorant without really reading it. I shouldn't be surprised, though. This same board poo-poos the dangers of fluoride-- another supposed "natural" substance added to our water to supposedly help our teeth. Little do most people know that the fluoridating chemical used is fluorosilicic acid or aka hydrofluorosilicic acid, which is scavenged from the smoke stack scrubbers at phosphate fertilizer production plants. It is not purified or processed in any way prior to being added to the water supply. Samples of HFSA have been tested by 3 independent laboratories and found to be 18-19% fluoride, upwards of 40% aluminum, and also contains contaminants such as lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium and others.

For those of you on this board who are so big on FDA approval and studies, the FDA has NOT approved this chemical for human consumption, and there are no studies supporting the safety or effectiveness of this chemical for human consumption.

One of the largest studies ever done looking at the effectiveness of public water fluoridation is the 1986-87 NIDR study that looked at 39,207 school aged children divided up into 3 groups based on fluoridation status of their area: fluoridated, non- fluoridated and partially fluoridated. There was no statistically significant difference across the three groups with regard to tooth decay.

I've even challenge the founder of this site, Cecil Adams, on these facts and guess what I got? Crickets... Ditto from the guy who runs Quackwatch-- got some email responses from him, which amounted to some ad hominem attacks, but no refutation of any of the facts presented.


So forgive me if I don't put a whole lot of stock into what straight dope says. Any of you on here are welcome to challenge me, I enjoy shredding people on this subject.
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