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  #1  
Old 01-05-2011, 01:06 AM
BaneSidhe BaneSidhe is offline
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Does celery freeze well?

I have a couple of recipes that require chopped celery. Only problem is they don't require much, which leaves me with several stalks that inevitably go bad. The bunnies and birds love the foliage at the top and I do like a nice crunchy stalk myself, but usually there's more on the bunch than we can use. Can it be frozen and used in cooking or is it one of those veggies that doesn't freeze well?
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  #2  
Old 01-05-2011, 01:15 AM
even sven even sven is online now
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I don't know about freezing it, but leftover celery makes for an excellent and super-easy creme soup.
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Old 01-05-2011, 01:21 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Freezes just fine. Doesn't thaw that well though.
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Old 01-05-2011, 03:43 AM
penultima thule penultima thule is offline
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ROFL
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  #5  
Old 01-05-2011, 03:57 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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If you're wanting to save it for use in soups or stews (like say for a mirepoix or your Cajun "holy trinity)), frozen celery works just fine.
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Old 01-05-2011, 07:08 AM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
Freezes just fine. Doesn't thaw that well though.
Frozen raw celery will have a texture change. Probably if you panfried it in a little oil, you could freeze and thaw it with good results. Probably.

If I have leftover celery, I just smear it with cream cheese and set it in front of my husband. Problem solved.
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Old 01-05-2011, 07:10 AM
bouv bouv is offline
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Anything with a lot of water content is going to have a hard time after being frozen. The water turns into little ice crystals, as well as expanding in size, and so a lot of the cells burst, cell walls get damaged, so when it thaws, it's mushy, the water leaks out so it becomes dry, etc...

The best way to freeze things with a lot of water is to freeze them fast. The faster they get frozen, the smaller the ice crystals become, and less likely to puncture the cells. So I recommend quick baths in liquid nitrogen.
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Old 01-05-2011, 07:17 AM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
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Do a fine dice of carrot, celery & onion, sautee in butter with a generous amount of salt until the pan is dry, then freeze in flat sheets in ziplock bags. The combination of cooking, driving out most of the moisture and freezing fast means there will be minimal textural damage. This is the first step to many classical French/Italian recipes and can be a massive time saver.
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Old 01-05-2011, 08:37 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Notice you never see frozen celery in the supermarket. There's a reason for that.
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  #10  
Old 01-05-2011, 08:39 AM
BlueKangaroo BlueKangaroo is offline
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I do freeze excess celery, but as everyone else says here, not for eating later. I use it to make stock (chicken or veggie) later, when I have a pile of things of that nature.
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  #11  
Old 01-05-2011, 08:55 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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I freeze extra celery (which is rare at my household, but it happens). It retains the celery taste but not the crispness when thawed. Frozen celery goes in soups and stews in this house.
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  #12  
Old 01-05-2011, 09:22 AM
Snickers Snickers is offline
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I've heard that wrapping celery in aluminum foil and storing it in the fridge gives it amazing longevity. According to one of my cookbooks, it'll keep for weeks. Sadly, I'm just in the middle of my first experiment to see if it really works or not.

Earlier just this week, I wanted to use some celery in a recipe when I noticed that one of my bunches had gone bad. The other one was still usable, though, so I used what I needed, wrapped the rest in foil, and stashed it back in the fridge. We'll see how well the tinfoil test goes.

Last edited by Snickers; 01-05-2011 at 09:25 AM..
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  #13  
Old 01-05-2011, 07:03 PM
voguevixen voguevixen is offline
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No recipe "requires" chopped celery but for Celery Soup or Celery and Peanut Butter. I mean it's flavorless water and strings for crying out loud. Skip it next time and see if you notice a difference.
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  #14  
Old 01-06-2011, 04:51 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Notice you never see frozen celery in the supermarket. There's a reason for that.
I've certainly seen frozen celery at the supermarket--not plain, necessarily (I'd have to check), but definitely in vegetable mixes. Like I said, celery freezes absolutely fine if all you're doing is using it for soups or stews.
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  #15  
Old 01-07-2011, 03:36 AM
jellyblue jellyblue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snickers View Post
I've heard that wrapping celery in aluminum foil and storing it in the fridge gives it amazing longevity. According to one of my cookbooks, it'll keep for weeks. Sadly, I'm just in the middle of my first experiment to see if it really works or not.

Earlier just this week, I wanted to use some celery in a recipe when I noticed that one of my bunches had gone bad. The other one was still usable, though, so I used what I needed, wrapped the rest in foil, and stashed it back in the fridge. We'll see how well the tinfoil test goes.
The tinfoil thing definitely works.
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  #16  
Old 01-07-2011, 10:30 AM
Casey1505 Casey1505 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Notice you never see frozen celery in the supermarket. There's a reason for that.
Besides the fact that fresh celery is pretty cheap and plentiful year round?
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