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  #1  
Old 05-12-2008, 12:50 PM
dalej42 dalej42 is offline
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Is pro tennis irrelevant?

There was an article on ESPN's website about the US Open being televised by ESPN. It got me thinking about how tennis seems to have really dropped in popularity. Aside from the Williams sisters, I can't name any pro tennis players. I used to know Borg, Connors, Agassi, King, and others. They used to be in the newspaper and sports magazines.

Then I got to thinking, I don't even know anyone who plays tennis any longer.

Aside from a few moments of Wimbledon, I haven't watched any tennis coverage in many years.

Why did pro tennis drop so much in popularity? I'm thinking the rise in golf eclipsed tennis.
  #2  
Old 05-12-2008, 12:59 PM
Wee Bairn Wee Bairn is offline
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One reason for the drop I think is the lack of rivalries- the various ones between Borg/McEnroe/Lendl/Connors, etc., and haven't had a good one since Agassi/Sampras a few years back. Federer/Nadal isn't really a rivalry as Nadal always wins on clay and Federer on all other surfaces, but since Roger's all but done now (he maybe has one or two Wimbledons left in him), maybe Nadal/Djokic will become a good one? Also, Federer and Nadal are pretty quiet guys, not characters, but Djokic seems to be quite the joker, so that could help.

Last edited by Wee Bairn; 05-12-2008 at 01:00 PM.
  #3  
Old 05-12-2008, 01:10 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wee Bairn
Roger's all but done now (he maybe has one or two Wimbledons left in him)
The guy loses two or three early-season tournaments and people go nuts. He's 26, and in January he made the semis in Australia while fighting food poisoning and mono.

Anyway, this has been a conversation within tennis for a long time. Tennis went through a boom in U.S. during the late 70s or early 80s, as I understand it, and that's long since faded. Internationally the game is doing well - for example, it's getting bigger in Asia - but in the U.S. it's not so great. The USTA seems to be managed stupidly, which is a problem, but it's also true that we just saw a terrific generation of U.S. players pass from the scene, and that's hard to duplicate.
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Old 05-12-2008, 01:42 PM
Yorikke Yorikke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalej42
There was an article on ESPN's website about the US Open being televised by ESPN. It got me thinking about how tennis seems to have really dropped in popularity. Aside from the Williams sisters, I can't name any pro tennis players. I used to know Borg, Connors, Agassi, King, and others. They used to be in the newspaper and sports magazines.

Then I got to thinking, I don't even know anyone who plays tennis any longer.
I am not a tennis nut. I am a VERY casual fan of the game. I never watch more than a few minutes of a match on TV at any time.

But for you to say that you don't know anyone other than the Williams sisters indicates that you simply do not read the sports page, or watch Sportscenter, at all. Do you follow other sports? Just reading the sports page, I am familiar with Federer vs. Nadal, the recent comeback of Martina Hingis, and, of course, Maria Sharapova. Djokovic's recent surge, the betting scandal with Davydenko... No, I don't know details of all these peoples' careers, but Tennis is still a top-7 or-8 sport in news coverage.

Joe
  #5  
Old 05-12-2008, 02:01 PM
Troy McClure SF Troy McClure SF is offline
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Originally Posted by wheresgeorge04
...you simply do not read the sports page, or watch Sportscenter, at all.
It's entirely possible, with use of the mouse and the remote control, to read the sports page and watch Sportscenter, and not absorb any tennis information. Almost true of hockey, too (and here, that may be because the Sharks are generally good).

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Tennis is still a top-7 or-8 sport in news coverage.
Well, RC Cola is #3 in cola sales, but that doesn't mean you or any of your friends necessarily keeps a 12-pack in the fridge.
  #6  
Old 05-12-2008, 02:43 PM
LionelHutz405 LionelHutz405 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalej42
Why did pro tennis drop so much in popularity? I'm thinking the rise in golf eclipsed tennis.
I think a big part of it is demographics. It's no co-incidence that as the baby boomers age the popularity of tennis has decreased and golf has increased. Of course, I'm referring to actually playing these sports, but people tend to be more interested in watching sports they play themselves.
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Old 05-12-2008, 02:51 PM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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I've been a tennis fan since the 70s. I've noticed the trend that the OP suggests over the past 10 years or so, I call it the "Pete Sampras Effect" of homogenizing the style of player and the type of talent that can be successful.

Essentially, the men's game has gradually evolved from a more interesting slow game that allowed for many play styles and tactics, to a flattened game of power tactics that have squeezed out (IMO) the more interesting play stylists like Connors, Borg, etc.

Agassi has been the lone holdout of the "oldschool" game of tactically working the baseline and agressive net play. Players of today are essentially using sniper rifles every play--fast and deadly, but boring for the fans. You'll no longer see players be able to successfully change tactics and adapt gameplay during play, that struggle seems absent now. Either a player's power game is 'on' or 'off' and that decides the match.

The women's game is the only one of interest now, from a tactical tennis enjoyment perspective. Even they are starting to suffer under the raw power players, but there is still room for scrappiness and "thinking" players to do well there.
  #8  
Old 05-12-2008, 03:00 PM
Wee Bairn Wee Bairn is offline
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Originally Posted by Marley23
The guy loses two or three early-season tournaments and people go nuts. He's 26, and in January he made the semis in Australia while fighting food poisoning and mono.
If he were losing to great players, it would be a little better, but he's never lost this many tournaments in years. Since he's been medically cleared after Australia, he's lost to not only Roddick but the likes of Radek Stepanek, Andy Murray and Marty Fish, players he would never lose a set to in previous years, and barely beaten guys like Ruben Ramirez Hildago- you don't think that's cause for concern?

Last edited by Wee Bairn; 05-12-2008 at 03:01 PM.
  #9  
Old 05-12-2008, 03:42 PM
John DiFool John DiFool is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GargoyleWB

Essentially, the men's game has gradually evolved from a more interesting slow game that allowed for many play styles and tactics, to a flattened game of power tactics that have squeezed out (IMO) the more interesting play stylists like Connors, Borg, etc.

Agassi has been the lone holdout of the "oldschool" game of tactically working the baseline and agressive net play. Players of today are essentially using sniper rifles every play--fast and deadly, but boring for the fans. You'll no longer see players be able to successfully change tactics and adapt gameplay during play, that struggle seems absent now. Either a player's power game is 'on' or 'off' and that decides the match.

The women's game is the only one of interest now, from a tactical tennis enjoyment perspective. Even they are starting to suffer under the raw power players, but there is still room for scrappiness and "thinking" players to do well there.
While I agree in general with your criticism (why they don't tone the rackets down some is beyond me), I wouldn't blame Pete for that because he likely will go down as the last of the great serve-and-volleyers, and indeed was more than capable of altering his game on the fly (no one-note booming server was he). On the women's side the last dedicated serve-and-volleyer of any note was Yana Novotna, so in that sense things are even worse over there (Williams sisters have solid volleying games but don't spend a lot of time up there). You simply can't approach the net (a significant % of the time) because the big springy rackets will pass you more often than not.
  #10  
Old 05-12-2008, 06:19 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GargoyleWB
Agassi has been the lone holdout of the "oldschool" game of tactically working the baseline and agressive net play.
I'm assuming you meant Sampras here. Let's not forget that throughout his career, people also called him boring because he wasn't much of a personality. There's really no pleasing some people.
There are boring and uncreative players out there, to be sure, but both Federer and Djokovic are good with tactics and they play aesthetically compelling styles. It could be worse - a few years ago, Lleyton Hewitt was number one!
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The women's game is the only one of interest now, from a tactical tennis enjoyment perspective. Even they are starting to suffer under the raw power players, but there is still room for scrappiness and "thinking" players to do well there.
"Starting to suffer?" Most of the women's matches I see are error-fests. With a few exceptions, they all try to hit too big. I'm curious which players you have in mind here: I'd exempt Henin, the Williamses, Mauresmo (who seems to have lost her edge entirely, alas) and maybe some lesser players like Schiavone.

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Originally Posted by Wee Bairn
If he were losing to great players, it would be a little better, but he's never lost this many tournaments in years.
It's true. But the reality is that even the top players lose matches to nobodies once in a while. The fact that Federer has pretty much avoided that over the last four years is the really amazing thing. He's dropped a few of those matches lately and is only just playing his way back into form. I think he should be playing more and should look into changing his tactics more. But he should have a couple of good years ahead of him still.
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Old 05-12-2008, 08:37 PM
GargoyleWB GargoyleWB is offline
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Granted, I was trying to be generous to the women's game by saying they are "starting to suffer", but I agree. The current women's game is an overhitting slopfest. My heart belongs to Chris Evert, though, so I admit a bit of bias
  #12  
Old 05-12-2008, 11:12 PM
Yorikke Yorikke is offline
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Originally Posted by Troy McClure SF

Well, RC Cola is #3 in cola sales, but that doesn't mean you or any of your friends necessarily keeps a 12-pack in the fridge.
Yeah, but the number of people who have 12-packs of each of the top 3 (Coke, Pepsi, and RC) in their fridge is likely close to zero. The number of people who follow baseball, basketball, and football is very large. I have a working knowledge (casual or better) of most sports covered in the US, and I'm not a fanatic for any sport.

Joe
  #13  
Old 05-13-2008, 06:05 AM
Dead Badger Dead Badger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wee Bairn
If he were losing to great players, it would be a little better, but he's never lost this many tournaments in years. Since he's been medically cleared after Australia, he's lost to not only Roddick but the likes of Radek Stepanek, Andy Murray and Marty Fish, players he would never lose a set to in previous years, and barely beaten guys like Ruben Ramirez Hildago- you don't think that's cause for concern?
I don't know if you've ever had mono, but I have and I wasn't right again for a solid year (and was near bed-ridden for a month). I had to skip Wimbledon, and rule my self out of selection for England at cricket and football; it was terrible. It keeps coming back periodically too, well after you think it's gone. He may have been "medically cleared", but I'd be amazed if he wasn't still feeling the effects from time to time (which would explain his erratic performances). As far as I'm concerned anything he achieves at all this season is something of a feat.

Incidentally, Murray beat Federer in 2006 as well; in fact he's got a 2-1 record against him.
  #14  
Old 05-14-2008, 10:37 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Originally Posted by Marley23
I'd exempt Henin, the Williamses, Mauresmo (who seems to have lost her edge entirely, alas) and maybe some lesser players like Schiavone.
Looks like I jinxed her, because Henin is preparing to announce that she is retiring, effective immediately at age 25. In an age of Sharapovas and wannabe-Williamses, Henin stood maybe 5'5" and won with incredible guts, fitness and a great backhand. She won seven majors and retires as the number one player in the world, although she wasn't playing well lately. She was probably the best player on the WTA tour over the last four years or so.

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/ten...ory?id=3395373
  #15  
Old 05-14-2008, 10:44 AM
Beware of Doug Beware of Doug is offline
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Originally Posted by GargoyleWB
Essentially, the men's game has gradually evolved from a more interesting slow game that allowed for many play styles and tactics, to a flattened game of power tactics that have squeezed out (IMO) the more interesting play stylists
And this is different from politics, entertainment, and other areas of the culture how, exactly? We may just be up against the Zeitgeist here.
  #16  
Old 05-14-2008, 11:00 AM
ShadowFacts ShadowFacts is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marley23
Looks like I jinxed her, because Henin is preparing to announce that she is retiring, effective immediately at age 25. In an age of Sharapovas and wannabe-Williamses, Henin stood maybe 5'5" and won with incredible guts, fitness and a great backhand. She won seven majors and retires as the number one player in the world, although she wasn't playing well lately. She was probably the best player on the WTA tour over the last four years or so.

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/ten...ory?id=3395373
Bummer
  #17  
Old 01-19-2011, 02:15 PM
Mario 7 Mario 7 is offline
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digression of modern tennis into a one-dimensional (read, boring) sport

Before the larger racket heads and more powerful composite materials came into being in the 80's and beyond, there was a vastly greater variety and individuality in style as well as shot-making.
What we have now is a fast homogenized game consisting of top-spin shots hit pretty much the same way by all the guys on the circuit, because with the rackets now out there there's nothing else to do that makes sense. For those who grew up playing in the 70's, it's a real downer.
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Old 01-19-2011, 02:23 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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If you think Federer and Nadal play the same style, I have to wonder how much of a tennis fan you are. On the other hand, this thread is so old that Henin has unretired.

Last edited by Marley23; 01-19-2011 at 02:24 PM.
  #19  
Old 01-19-2011, 02:28 PM
notfrommensa notfrommensa is offline
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I don't follow tennis nearly as much today as I did 25 years ago when you American stars in both mens and womens tennis.

Do zombies tend to play a serve and volley or are they baseliners?
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Old 01-19-2011, 02:36 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Nice resurrection.
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Old 01-19-2011, 02:47 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Do zombies tend to play a serve and volley or are they baseliners?
For the most part they just stand around the baseline groaning and boring everybody. Or maybe I'm thinking of the Russian women.
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Old 01-19-2011, 02:48 PM
PunditLisa PunditLisa is offline
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Do zombies tend to play a serve and volley or are they baseliners?
They tend to hang out in no-man's land.

I'll be here all week, folks. Don't forget to tip your waitress!
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Old 01-19-2011, 06:40 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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They tend to hang out in no-man's land.

I'll be here all week, folks. Don't forget to tip your waitress!
How's the veal?
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Old 01-19-2011, 06:44 PM
Omniscient Omniscient is offline
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As opposed to amateur tennis?

Also.....Braaaaains!
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Old 01-19-2011, 06:47 PM
amarone amarone is offline
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They tend to hang out in no-man's land.
They're useful in Davis Cup for playing the dead rubbers.
  #26  
Old 01-20-2011, 11:37 PM
notfrommensa notfrommensa is offline
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More Zombies: who knew that the Aussie Open would have a dead spot on one of the courts. Umpires bounced a ball on the court and it literally did not bounce.
  #27  
Old 01-21-2011, 12:28 AM
Swords to Plowshares Swords to Plowshares is offline
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Pro tennis is pretty damn exciting now that Federer isn't totally invincible. The one major thing the game lacks is a male American hero. No, not Roddick; I root for him every time and as much as I love the guy he tends to choke in finals (and before) a lot.
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Old 01-21-2011, 12:56 AM
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Love me a zombie thread.

But I'll answer it anyway. The biggest problem is the equipment. It's just too damn good.

If anyone is old enough to remember that POS Wilson 3000 that Connors played with, or the AMF Head Arthur Ashe used to win tournaments, you know what I mean. Men's tennis was much more interesting when there were rallies of more than one ace serve hit 150 mph, or a serve and volley of two or three shots.

When rackets were wooden or the early metal ones were not the easiest to hit hard accurate shots and as a result, the rallies could be longer, more exciting and less predictable. Borg, McEnroe, Connors, Ashe, Nastase, Becker, et al were all fantastic players, but they didn't rely on complete brute strength (well, maybe Becker). Now, it's a power serve/grunt, followed by an ace or defensive return. If the server is coming in for a volley, the point can be over quickly.

The other big reason is the lack of personalities. Many of the new stars are like robots, and as much as I can appreciate the amazing skill of a Sampras or Federer, they aren't the most exciting or controversial guys in the world. Nadal is the best thing to happen to mens tennis in years, and I hope he stays healthy long enough to develop a few long standing rivalries. But he's kind of boring compared to any of those crazymen of the 70s and 80s.

Women's tennis used to be compelling because of long rallies, but the can hit almost as hard as the men with the new equipment, which reduce the rally potential. Plus, the stars aren't all that appealing. Other than the beautiful Russians and some eastern Europeans, there isn't much to be excited about. Evert, Navratalova, Sabatini, for example, were not only attractive in their own way, but they had healthy rivalries and were fun to watch. Now, except for Maria Sharapova, I don't know many names. I root for Sharapova, but I don't follow it as much as I used to, so I have no idea how well she is doing at any time.

The William sisters are the only americans I can think of. I like Venice, but she isn't all that exciting, and Serina is a bit of a bully (the tirade at that linesperson was disturbing). I will root for Venice, but not for Serina. Plus, they hit the ball about as hard as a guy, making the equipment a bigger part of the game than it should be.
  #29  
Old 01-21-2011, 01:50 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Originally Posted by Stink Fish Pot View Post
Men's tennis was much more interesting when there were rallies of more than one ace serve hit 150 mph, or a serve and volley of two or three shots.
Today's game is known for long baseline rallies, not serving and volleying. The serve and volley style was associated with older equipment. People long for its return today. They say that was more exciting.

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When rackets were wooden or the early metal ones were not the easiest to hit hard accurate shots and as a result, the rallies could be longer, more exciting and less predictable.
WHAT? How does less accurate = longer, more exciting rallies? Less accurate = more errors.

Quote:
But he's kind of boring compared to any of those crazymen of the 70s and 80s.
There's some truth here. The problem is that being weird and crazy generally hurts your game for the most part and doesn't help you win. That's more true than ever in a game that is played almost year-round and that requires constant training. It's hard to be consistently good if your focus wanders. Marat Safin was pretty crazy, and it overshadowed his talent.

Quote:
Plus, the stars aren't all that appealing.
What's wrong with Clijsters?

[quote]The William sisters are the only americans I can think of.[/quote[
You're not forgetting anybody.

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Plus, they hit the ball about as hard as a guy
No, they don't. They hit harder than most of the women (and overhitting is prevalent on the WTA), but a guy would blow them off the court.
  #30  
Old 01-21-2011, 04:48 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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? or to put it more strongly.......??????

We live in a time when possibly the two greatest ever players have been at the height of their powers. They have provided tennis of a quality rarely seen and have done so with a consistency never seen. Their grand slam clashes have thrown up astonishing spectacles.

And what role models, If my children ever ask me to define athleticism and sportsmanship I will point them in the direction of Federer and Nadal.

You couldn't ask for better figureheads. We are lucky indeed to witness it and will miss it when it is gone.


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No, they don't. They hit harder than most of the women (and overhitting is prevalent on the WTA), but a guy would blow them off the court.
True, neither Williams sister would stand a chance against any competent male professional.
  #31  
Old 01-21-2011, 11:07 AM
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I've personally found that pro tennis puts a much higher emphasis on power shots than say, badminton or squash, and I think much to its detriment. However, it's always going to be the most popular racquet sport because it's played outdoors. No one wants to stare at people in a gymnasium or watch two guys inside a concrete box...

...well, except for MMA. But that's different, lol.
  #32  
Old 01-22-2011, 11:57 PM
crypto crypto is offline
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Today's game is known for long baseline rallies, not serving and volleying. The serve and volley style was associated with older equipment. People long for its return today. They say that was more exciting.
You are right. I got it backward in my mind when I typed it out, and I'm glad you caught it. I remember when Borg and McEnroe played, it was the classic serve and volley game, something that is not as popular these days. The guys can sit on the baseline forever, waiting for the other player to make a mistake. I remember reading how loose McEnroe used to get his strings tied, so he could control the ball more. The longer the ball stayed in contact with the strings, the thinking went, the more spin could be put on the ball.

In re-reading my answer, I don't know what I was thinking. You are exactly right with your assessment. I wasn't drinking last night.... what time did I post? I did take NyQuil last night. Perhaps it was NyQuil induced. Whatever, it is embarrassing.

Last edited by crypto; 01-22-2011 at 11:58 PM.
  #33  
Old 01-23-2011, 09:33 AM
notfrommensa notfrommensa is offline
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True, neither Williams sister would stand a chance against any competent male professional.
I wonder how the Williams Sisters (and others) would do with todays equipment would do in the mid 70's against Connors, Ashe, Nastase, in their prime and wooden rackets.

I suspect the guys would still win, but it would be very competitive.
  #34  
Old 01-23-2011, 10:00 AM
Clawdio Clawdio is offline
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I didn't become a tennis fan until recenent years (watching Nadal grow from the player that could only win on clay, to completing the career grand slam has been great fun)

Nadal v Federar in the finals of a grand slam is just great television. With Federer's ability to always hit what seems like the perfect shot, and Nadal's ability to track down pretty much anything on the court, its some of the best sports watching currently on TV imho.
  #35  
Old 01-23-2011, 03:04 PM
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I don't know a single serious tennis fan. I haven't in at least 15 yrs. I would say it's dead.
  #36  
Old 01-23-2011, 03:28 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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I don't know a single serious tennis fan. I haven't in at least 15 yrs. I would say it's dead.
Well, I don't know a major rugby fan, but I wouldn't say it is dead. Same for cricket.

Our own experiences don't define the whole. Tennis is quite popular, still.
  #37  
Old 01-23-2011, 03:33 PM
amarone amarone is offline
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I don't know a single serious tennis fan. I haven't in at least 15 yrs. I would say it's dead.
Even if you just take a US perspective, attendance at the US Open has risen from 506,000 to about 720,000 in the 15 years that you haven't been watching.

The OP (from nearly 3 years ago) apparently does not know anyone that plays tennis, yet shortly after his post, the USTA announced record participation levels.

So I think we have people extrapolating personal experience to come to incorrect conclusions of what is happening in general.

The one thing I will agree with is that fewer casual fans follow tennis in the US compared with the days of Connors and McEnroe.
  #38  
Old 01-23-2011, 09:28 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Even if you just take a US perspective, attendance at the US Open has risen from 506,000 to about 720,000 in the 15 years that you haven't been watching.

The OP (from nearly 3 years ago) apparently does not know anyone that plays tennis, yet shortly after his post, the USTA announced record participation levels.

So I think we have people extrapolating personal experience to come to incorrect conclusions of what is happening in general.

The one thing I will agree with is that fewer casual fans follow tennis in the US compared with the days of Connors and McEnroe.
Very well done, amarone, and quite right.
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:57 PM
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When you get down to it, all pro sports are irrelevant. Popular, yes. Relevant, no.
  #40  
Old 01-24-2011, 05:44 PM
PunditLisa PunditLisa is offline
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Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
I don't know a single serious tennis fan. I haven't in at least 15 yrs. I would say it's dead.
I haven't gone to a baseball game since the first player's strike. Baseball is dying.
  #41  
Old 01-26-2011, 01:45 PM
fiddlesticks fiddlesticks is offline
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And Justine Henin just re-retired. The circle is complete.
  #42  
Old 01-26-2011, 03:33 PM
Superhal Superhal is offline
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Imho, tennis started having the same disadvantages of all judged sports: favoritism, regionalism, nationalism, etc. Like all judged sports (figure skating, diving, etc.) it's no longer perceived as a fair competition. I saw on sportscenter the other night that players can now call replay challenges on the judges, but I think it's too little, too late.

Also, I think that tennis became too watered down. Before, with 5 championships per year, they actually meant something. Now, you get like 50+ televised tournaments a year or something. Who cares about the Big Red Fresh Breath Open?
  #43  
Old 01-26-2011, 03:43 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superhal View Post
it's no longer perceived as a fair competition.
Who perceives it as unfair? If you think tournaments in the U.S. are staffed only by Americans, you're wrong. (Even if that were true, the tour in more international than ever.) The referees and line judges come from around the world, same as the players. I wish there were replays on more courts, but they are moving in the right direction there.

Quote:
Also, I think that tennis became too watered down. Before, with 5 championships per year, they actually meant something. Now, you get like 50+ televised tournaments a year or something. Who cares about the Big Red Fresh Breath Open?
I can't think of another way to say this: you don't know what you're talking about. There were never "5 championships per year." Never, ever, ever. There are four really big events (the majors; you might be counting the year-end tournament as the fifth) and a lot of other tournaments of varying sizes around the world. The non-major tournaments have been organized in various ways over the years and I couldn't even begin to recap the different reasons and strategies. The general trend is to make more events (I think they're called the 1000s at this point) mandatory so the top players face each other more often. There are several lower-tier tournaments for players trying to work their way up. This hasn't changed in a long time. And golf functions the exact same way.
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Old 01-26-2011, 04:48 PM
Ellis Dee Ellis Dee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superhal View Post
Imho, tennis started having the same disadvantages of all judged sports: favoritism, regionalism, nationalism, etc. Like all judged sports (figure skating, diving, etc.) it's no longer perceived as a fair competition. I saw on sportscenter the other night that players can now call replay challenges on the judges, but I think it's too little, too late.

Also, I think that tennis became too watered down. Before, with 5 championships per year, they actually meant something. Now, you get like 50+ televised tournaments a year or something. Who cares about the Big Red Fresh Breath Open?
Tennis is not a judged sport, nobody considers it unfair, and I am unaware of any televised tennis tournaments apart from the four majors. I'm pretty keyed into sports, and I would have to go searching to find one.
  #45  
Old 01-26-2011, 04:52 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellis Dee View Post
Tennis is not a judged sport
That's true. It's "judged" the same way all other sports are. But it's not figure skating where you get points for subjective criteria or boxing where the judges award points based on their interpretation of what happened. The calls in tennis are the equivalent of inbounds and out of bounds calls in baseball, football, or basketball. By that criteria almost every sport is judged. Maybe bowling isn't.

Quote:
I am unaware of any televised tennis tournaments apart from the four majors.
The year-end championship (the final, at least) was on ESPN2, and they do show some of the other big-but-not-Slam tournaments like Miami and Indian Wells. The tournaments leading up to the U.S. Open get the most attention. I think CBS still shows one or two finals during the summer tournaments. And there's the Tennis Channel, but that's specialized cable and should be considered a separate category.

Last edited by Marley23; 01-26-2011 at 04:54 PM.
  #46  
Old 01-26-2011, 05:28 PM
Ellis Dee Ellis Dee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
Maybe bowling isn't.
Foot faults.
  #47  
Old 01-26-2011, 05:45 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellis Dee View Post
Foot faults.
Oh yeah, I forgot about that. I hear they're pretty serious about that rule.
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