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Old 01-28-2011, 11:50 AM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
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Facial and neck tattoos. Do they have problems finding jobs?

I see them more and more. Why are they suddenly popular?

Personally, I don't give a crap. But I have to wonder... do people who get facial and neck tattoos have problems finding jobs?

Even though I couldn't care less how a person decorates their body, I know that I could never hire someone with a facial, neck, and/or hand tattoo. But only because we work very closely with our customer base, and I know it would be off-putting to our customers.

Last edited by Crafter_Man; 01-28-2011 at 11:50 AM.
  #2  
Old 01-28-2011, 11:54 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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I would imagine they do. Typically where I've seen that sort of thing outside of the entertainment industry is at record stores (which are rapidly going extinct) and auto repair shops. Even when I worked as a locksmith the shop I worked for made me wear long sleeves year-round because of a single tattoo on my forearm.
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Old 01-28-2011, 11:57 AM
Rigamarole Rigamarole is offline
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I saw a girl just the other day working at Subway with a tattoo on her neck behind her ear. She was quite pretty otherwise, but the tattoo kinda ruined it for me. I thought "yep, good way to ensure that you're going to be working at Subway forever".
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:17 PM
perfectparanoia perfectparanoia is offline
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I think it really depends on the company and what you will be doing for them. I work for a software company and when hiring programmers, tech support or QA (i.e. the people who never or rarely see a real live customer) our first criteria is attitude (which should be fun and possibly snarky), then knowledge (we can always teach them stuff).

How they look, assuming they don't wear rags to the interview (which looking at my coworkers they could wear to work if hired), is moot.

However, most of my buds who are not in my industry have some pretty interesting dress codes (they have to look nice and stuff) where such things would probably not fly.
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:30 PM
heathen earthling heathen earthling is offline
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
I know it would be off-putting to our customers.
Why?
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:37 PM
Antinor01 Antinor01 is offline
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I work in insurance, which tends toward the more conservative. Several of our managers and at least one director have tons of tattoos. Included among them are at least one with full sleeves and neck work.
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:38 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Why?
Because a large percentage of the population think they are silly, stupid, ugly, a sign of moral turpitude, or some combination of the above. I know I would never hire anybody with a visible tat, and a facial or neck tat would send the applicant out the door without even an interview. Personal opinion on tats goes both ways. Decorate yourself as you please, but don't expect the rest of the world to respect your "individuality."
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:51 PM
Ludy Ludy is offline
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I work in the arts, theatre to be specific. There are only two positions I can think of where they would be a big problem, actors and fund development. If they are dealing with big corporations asking for sponsorship we want to look as professional as possible, so anyone in fundraising should be able to cover tattoos. And well for an actor I think it is obvious.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:08 PM
kopek kopek is offline
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Facial more a problem than neck. The neck is like arms these days - so common as to not be that unusual. The worse, from what friends have told me, are finger tats spelling out things like HATE and various derivatives of the F-bomb. Get those and plan your future in construction and like trades where gloves are always on.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:12 PM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
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Why?
My customer base consists of civilian and enlisted DoD engineers. 'Nuff said.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:15 PM
Scubaqueen Scubaqueen is offline
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Personally, I think there is still a stigma to being tattooed, despite the likes of Angelina Jolie and whatshisname from 'Lost' (the Jack character) sporting theirs in movies and such.

We're still a pretty conservative society in many respects, and I really don't think that Big Companies, etc. are going to muck around with that concept any time soon.

Right or wrong, I suspect that having a visible tattoo seems to suggest that you aren't very serious about being a professional or having a responsible career, and therefore won't be of much worth to Big Company.

I always wanted a tattoo, so I got one eons ago, but it's a very small rose low on the outside of my left ankle, and it isn't very noticeable unless you're looking for it. It never occurred to me to put one anywhere else and certainly not on my neck, arms or chest as I've seen on the street on ordinary, everyday folks.

I've also seen first-hand that at least in professional/semi-professional theater, you don't see tattoos at all, which used to surprise me during my early days of it, given the creative bent of most perfomers. I've been told that directors don't want them on their actors and dancers, and/or seeing the body paint to cover them up. YMMV.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:18 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Because a large percentage of the population think they are silly, stupid, ugly, a sign of moral turpitude, or some combination of the above. I know I would never hire anybody with a visible tat, and a facial or neck tat would send the applicant out the door without even an interview. Personal opinion on tats goes both ways. Decorate yourself as you please, but don't expect the rest of the world to respect your "individuality."
What he said. I do have to appreciate people who pierce and tattoo their faces and necks for letting us know exactly who we're dealing with, though.
  #13  
Old 01-28-2011, 01:20 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is online now
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As a teacher, I can tell you that it would be a problem.

Teacher's can have tattoos, but not in highly visible places. Arms are even OK as long at it isn't some elaborate huge thing, but face and all up the side of the neck are not OK. I've seen one lady with long hair have one on the back of her neck, but you couldn't see it.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:25 PM
DianaG DianaG is offline
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I do have to appreciate people who pierce and tattoo their faces and necks for letting us know exactly who we're dealing with, though.
You know, I say this exact same thing about people in sweatpants, and I'm a snotty bitch.




Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus
Decorate yourself as you please, but don't expect the rest of the world to respect your "individuality."
Does this apply to Hawaiian shirts too?

Last edited by DianaG; 01-28-2011 at 01:27 PM.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:29 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Of course. But I can change my shirt.

Last edited by silenus; 01-28-2011 at 01:30 PM.
  #16  
Old 01-28-2011, 01:37 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is online now
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Originally Posted by kopek View Post
Facial more a problem than neck. The neck is like arms these days - so common as to not be that unusual. The worse, from what friends have told me, are finger tats spelling out things like HATE and various derivatives of the F-bomb. Get those and plan your future in construction and like trades where gloves are always on.
I work in construction. There are a fair number of general contractors and companies who really don't want tattooed workers, especially those who work in the home remodeling market. Too many customers, especially the elderly, don't want to see them on people who work in their home. As older folks are a good slice of the business this is sort of relevant to hiring decisions.

There are still plenty of restaurants that won't hire someone with tattoos visible to customers. To her dying day if my mother saw a tattoo on a waiter she'd request a different server or leave the restaurant.

Folks may not get loud about it, but there are still many with a deep, deep prejudice against tattoos. If they see someone with a tattoo they'll assume they're criminal or a drug addict or both regardless of any other evidence to the contrary and regardless of how well done the work is.

Me personally - it's your body. I find hand and facial tattoos gross, especially names scrawled on someone's neck, but I'll not say jack about it because it's your body and none of my business. Tattoos elsewhere, if well done, I don't care either way unless it's obvious gang tattoos. Actually, if it's really well done I might even really like it. I will say, though, that a salesperson with his kid's names carved on his neck is going to have a harder time selling me stuff than someone who doesn't because I'll find that visible ink distracting at the very least, and possibly quite a turn off.
  #17  
Old 01-28-2011, 01:45 PM
Drunky Smurf Drunky Smurf is offline
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What he said. I do have to appreciate people who pierce and tattoo their faces and necks for letting us know exactly who we're dealing with, though.
Yeah me too. When ever I see a woman with a neck tattoo I know I'm dealing with a very beautiful successful Hollywood actress like Jessica Alba.

http://www.alba-jessica.net/en/about.php

Quote:
Tattoos : One at the neck, one under arm and one at the bottom of back
http://www.alba-jessica.net/en/images/tattoo2.jpg

Or a successful singer like Brittany Spears.

http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/...100439109.html


Whenever I see a man with a neck tattoo I know I'm dealing with a successful rock musician and businessman like Tim Armstrong.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Armstrong

Thank god people have neck tattoos so I know who to get an autograph from.

I also appreciate people who put "cat" in their user names so I know who I'm dealing with.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:54 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
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I always wonder about the kids with the extreme face tattoos (like the guy who turned his head into a skull).

I'm not a parent, but if I was and my kid did that, I don't think I'd ever get over it.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:56 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is online now
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Or a successful singer like Brittany Spears.

http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/...100439109.html
Classy. Looks like she was shot with a paintball gun.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:05 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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I've worked in hotels and this in the past, has been a huge no-no. I've seen perfectly good candidates turned down because of it. Of course the "official reason" is "we went with another candidate."

But it's becoming more and more acceptable as tatoos are not "taboo" anymore

In retail, I see lots of top managers with them. I've seen them in almost all public service jobs and in government jobs from Social Security office, to city of Chicago to the post office, all have workers with neck and face tatoos.

I worked in a computer store over the holidays and you could have a face tatoo but the men still couldn't wear earrings
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:09 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
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Classy. Looks like she was shot with a paintball gun.
Or has a nasty skin disease.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:15 PM
sachertorte sachertorte is offline
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There are still plenty of restaurants that won't hire someone with tattoos visible to customers. To her dying day if my mother saw a tattoo on a waiter she'd request a different server or leave the restaurant.
Oh how times have changed.
I've become so accustomed to being served coffee at my local coffee shop by guys and gals with piercings and tattoos that it just doesn't feel right to have a barista who doesn't have tattoos or piercings or dreadlocks.
Of course the new guy is clean-cut, but I forgive him since he is ridiculously hot.

On a more serious level, I'd agree that I'd be put off by a visible tattoo at a fancy restaurant. I doubt I'd care too much, but I'd notice and think it odd.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:16 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is online now
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We're still a pretty conservative society in many respects, and I really don't think that Big Companies, etc. are going to muck around with that concept any time soon.

Right or wrong, I suspect that having a visible tattoo seems to suggest that you aren't very serious about being a professional or having a responsible career, and therefore won't be of much worth to Big Company.
Well, I work for a pretty Big Company, a large software developer headquartered in Redmond Washington. There are plenty of people with tatoos here. Of course, I don't work on the customer facing side. It might hamper your work if you were in legal or marketing or upper management. But if you're a developer or tester or designer? Not really a problem. I guess PMs tend to be a bit more clean cut, and as you move from individual contributor to lead you see that sort of thing less and less.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:16 PM
Absolute Absolute is offline
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Yeah me too. When ever I see a woman with a neck tattoo I know I'm dealing with a very beautiful successful Hollywood actress like Jessica Alba.
...
Or a successful singer like Brittany Spears.
...
Whenever I see a man with a neck tattoo I know I'm dealing with a successful rock musician and businessman like Tim Armstrong.
...
Thank god people have neck tattoos so I know who to get an autograph from.
...
I also appreciate people who put "cat" in their user names so I know who I'm dealing with.
Actresses, pop stars, and musicians? Some of the most fucked-up people on the planet, as a group.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:38 PM
otternell otternell is offline
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I have a friend with a ton of tattoos and she has to wear turtlenecks and long sleeved shirts, and either full skirts or pants everyday at work, regardless of how hot it is outside. Her company specifically prohibits visible tattoos - its their policy.

also, I remember working in a CPA firm and one girl had the neatest tattoo of a phoenix. And she wore sleeveless blouses in the summer time occasionally. Until a partner told her that she needed to cover it up. Then she got all whiny and bitchy about it. I wasn't particularly surprised - its a CPA firm. Those folks are more uptight than any other industry on the planet.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:59 PM
Zeriel Zeriel is offline
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My customer base consists of civilian and enlisted DoD engineers. 'Nuff said.
Odd, I'd expect that "enlisted military" would be a subgroup with a relatively high tolerance for tattooing--I certainly see enough arm/shoulder tattoos on those guys.

As with many of the techie types here, I wouldn't have a problem hiring someone with a tattoo pretty much anywhere--it's much less relevant in our geeky little caves. Granted, I personally dislike pretty much all tattoos and piercings more than a tasteful earring or whatever, but I don't see any reason to judge someone harshly for having one (unless the artwork itself is also unacceptable outside the tattoo context, like the aforementioned f-bomb knuckles).

Last edited by Zeriel; 01-28-2011 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:02 PM
Grrr! Grrr! is online now
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What he said. I do have to appreciate people who pierce and tattoo their faces and necks for letting us know exactly who we're dealing with, though.
OK. I'll bite. What are you dealing with?
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:12 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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OK. I'll bite. What are you dealing with?
An Individual!
  #29  
Old 01-28-2011, 03:14 PM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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You know, I say this exact same thing about people in sweatpants, and I'm a snotty bitch.





Does this apply to Hawaiian shirts too?
The thing with sweats and Hawaiian shirts is that you don't usually show up to the job interview in them. If you do, I can make a call on what kind of person you are and if you are a good fit for the job.

Facial tattoos can be difficult to cover up. I really don't care if you have one on your arm or a "tramp stamp" or something on your ankle when I'm hiring you.....that's under "what I don't know can't create an issue." And if, after I hire you, you expose it - well, if you aren't dealing with customers and it isn't a distraction, I don't care (exposing the tattoo on your ass might be a distraction, but that distraction might not be completely due to the tattoo). But a facial tattoo or one on the neck (not covered by long hair) or HATE on the fingers - those sort of scream "I really don't have good judgment." That's a fine thing for many jobs, but not the sort of job I've ever hired for (and I'm a techie type).
  #30  
Old 01-28-2011, 03:17 PM
DianaG DianaG is offline
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If you show up at the supermarket in sweatpants, I assure you, I'm making a call on what kind of person you are, and I absolutely question your judgement.

I'm not defending facial tattoos, or ignoring the fact that tattoos are permanent, but anyone who defends sweatpants outside the house but decries neck tattoos is fooling themselves if they think they're talking about a difference of quality as opposed to degree.

Last edited by DianaG; 01-28-2011 at 03:20 PM.
  #31  
Old 01-28-2011, 03:24 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is online now
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Oh how times have changed.
Oh, yes.

I've got friend who can't stand tattoos because they remind him of the numbers the Nazis tattooed on his mother's arm. I can sort of see where even the best done body art can make him uncomfortable with associations like that.

See, that's one of the downsides to tattoos. Although now they're seen as pretty innocuous by one segment of the population there are enough other groups around who have a completely different association with them that it can cause problems.
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:26 PM
apollonia apollonia is offline
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Well, given that I have a tattoo (but one that's pathetically easy to cover up and would never even come up in a work setting), I don't really care either way. I think the stereotype comes from people like this girl I know--who complains all the time about "selling out" and having to get a real job, who wants to write the Great American Novel but spends most of her time getting drunk and talking about it more than anything, and then gets drunk and gets a tattoo on the back of her neck. (Disclaimer: Shady, shady, super-sketch tattoo studio! Any reputable half-decent artist will not work on an intoxicated client! But if you go to a lousy place where the artists are just killing time between smoke breaks, sure, anything goes.)

To a lot of people, neck tattoos (and face tattoos) say "impetuous poorly-thought-out decision," or "I didn't think this through," or "I made lousy decisions in college." To me, it doesn't say that, because I can't be bothered to worry about what other people put on their skin. But to a lot of people, especially those of older generations or who are especially conservative, very visible tattoos can be a sign of Trouble.
  #33  
Old 01-28-2011, 03:48 PM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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Yeah me too. When ever I see a woman with a neck tattoo I know I'm dealing with a very beautiful successful Hollywood actress like Jessica Alba.

Or a successful singer like Brittany Spears.
Right. Because I totally want someone as mature, stable, and responsible as Britney when I'm looking for an investment banker.
  #34  
Old 01-28-2011, 03:50 PM
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I have a tattoo on my shoulder and one on my forearm. I can easily cover them with a long sleeved shirt. Neck and face tattoos just scream "convict" to me, especially on guys with gym rat builds & shaved heads. I say that as a gym rat with a shaved head.
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:56 PM
Khaki Campbell Khaki Campbell is offline
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Just for the record, people with tattoos (and who are serious about them) are this way because they like it aesthetically for themselves and don't give a shit what you think. More than that, they don't give a shit if you give a shit or not.
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:57 PM
Khaki Campbell Khaki Campbell is offline
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The thing is, I've got extensive tats, but they're all hidden under a short-sleeved shirt. Never been attracted by facial ink at all.
  #37  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:01 PM
lexi lexi is offline
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I do have to appreciate people who pierce and tattoo their faces and necks for letting us know exactly who we're dealing with, though.
I agree with Cat Whisperer here, and I have friends who are highly tattooed - including a friend who has 80% of his body tattooed.

The thing is culturally, tattoos are not mainstream, and in many cases they are not culturally accepted. Because the cultural norm is to be un-tattooed, one who makes a conscious decision to get a tattoo in a visible location either:
A.) Has chosen to ignore these cultural norms
B.) Lacks the foresight or knowledge of these cultural norms and the possible impact of not conforming to these norms.

There is a reason why tattoo parlors do not tattoo people under the age of 18, it is not only because of risks, it is because someone who is too young may not be aware of the outcome of the decision to get a tattoo. Even tattoo parlor owners and artists are aware of these cultural norms, and will on occasion refuse to tattoo people over the age of 18 because of the location or size of the tattoo.

When I see someone who has visible and obvious tattoos, and is not overly young or naive, what I see is a rebel because to not expect that having visible tattoos would bother some people is extremely immature.

There are plenty of special snowflakes in their 20's who think getting inked is cool & anyone who would not hire them due to the ink is prejudice and close minded. They sincerely do not think that the body art they are getting would possible impact a future career. They can't be completely unaware that tattoo are rebellious, but many of them hide them from their parents at first.

Rebellious people can be great in some worlds. I'd expect a tattoo artist to be tattooed but I am not sure I'd want my doctor to be visibly tattooed. I know heavily tattooed people can cover up, for example I know a lawyer who covers up his sleeves when he should, and shows them when he can. He was mature in his tattoo choices.

Another person I know does not need to work due to his creative endeavors. He is about 80% covered including his skull. He has no reason or need to conform to any norms, but before he reached this point in his life, he kept his body art in places that would be covered in situations that may impact his chance of getting a job.

Earlobes the size of Frisbees and stars on your temple may work if you have a successful band that has been signed to a major label - but that look may hamper the chances of getting a job as an engineer.

I don't think tattoos are ever going to be accepted to such a level that it they are considered to be mainstream instead of being rebellious. There are long standing cultural & religious prohibitions against tattoos, and these aren't going away over night. Long hair on men and earrings on men are still not mainstream in many circles. Personally I like rebels, I am a rebel too, although I don't have any tattoos, I've dyed my hair cherry red and have sweaters with argyle & skulls in the past - but I need a job, and I work in a conservative city, in a conservative field - so no matter how much I may want to, for work my hair is a natural shade and my clothing is conservative. I don't have a choice if I want to work and rebellion is not more important than my career.

Because of these factors what I see when I see someone with visible body art is:

1.) Someone who doesn't need or want a mainstream career.
2.) Someone who doesn't care about societal norms.
3.) Someone who isn't mature enough to know they are making a choice between a mainstream career & body art.

None of those 3 types of people are the type I'd hire to do my job although I may buy their next book or CD.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:07 PM
Enderw24 Enderw24 is offline
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Facial and neck tattoos. Do they have problems finding jobs?

Ink is notoriously shiftless and lazy so it's usually not an issue. But with the economy the way it is, even the most inteligent and hard working of designs are having difficulty with long term employment prospects.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:34 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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Just for the record, people with tattoos (and who are serious about them) are this way because they like it aesthetically for themselves and don't give a shit what you think. More than that, they don't give a shit if you give a shit or not.
Good. Then they won't give a shit about not getting a particular job and we can close this thread.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:37 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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I don't mind tattoos...but I think face and neck tattoos are pretty stupid. You justg have to deal with the fact that lots of the world doesn't appreciate them. Pretty much anything permanent and permanently visible is pretty stupid - what happens if you hate it later? And FTR, I have considered a small tattoo on the inside of my wrist, and may still get one - but it will be small enough that the majority of it will be covered by my wrist band. People just don't think is what it is.
  #41  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:37 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is online now
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Just for the record, people with tattoos (and who are serious about them) are this way because they like it aesthetically for themselves and don't give a shit what you think. More than that, they don't give a shit if you give a shit or not.
Sure. It's not at all about showing off, ever.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by DianaG View Post
If you show up at the supermarket in sweatpants, I assure you, I'm making a call on what kind of person you are, and I absolutely question your judgement.

I'm not defending facial tattoos, or ignoring the fact that tattoos are permanent, but anyone who defends sweatpants outside the house but decries neck tattoos is fooling themselves if they think they're talking about a difference of quality as opposed to degree.
Thats fine. I'm not asking anything of you when I run to the store in my sweatpants, and you don't need anything from me. If you judge me, it really doesn't affect me one way or another.

When I show up for a job interview in sweatpants, I'm asking you to hire me. And you need to evaluate what you are going to get from me in return for hiring me based on what I present to you in the interview. If I choose to wear sweatpants to that interview, that might say something about me, or the job. Now, it might be that its a perfectly appropriate sweatpants kind of job and we are golden, but for most jobs, there are more appropriate choices in clothing.

With sweatpants, I get to make that call when I prepare for the interview. So while wearing sweatpants to the grocery store might be a momentary lack of judgment - its a lack of judgment I can cover up in a job interview. Likewise - a tattoo I got while drunk across my ass saying "All Aboard" might not be the best judgment, but again, I can cover up that lack of judgment in an interview - and my boss is probably never going to discover it. A facial tattoo is hard to cover up. Its the sort of thing where an interviewer is going to have to decide if this is a facial tattoo appropriate sort of job, or not - and if your facial tattoo says something about you that is either positive or negative to the position I'm hiring for.
  #43  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:43 PM
Absolute Absolute is offline
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Originally Posted by Khaki Campbell View Post
Just for the record, people with tattoos (and who are serious about them) are this way because they like it aesthetically for themselves and don't give a shit what you think. More than that, they don't give a shit if you give a shit or not.
Great. Then they won't give a shit when I don't hire them because I think they look like someone who doesn't give a shit.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:46 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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Originally Posted by Dangerosa View Post
Likewise - a tattoo I got while drunk across my ass saying "All Aboard" might not be the best judgment <snip>
This made me laugh so hard I snorted water up my nose.
  #45  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:47 PM
DianaG DianaG is offline
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I don't disagree that a facial tattoo is hard to cover up, and I certainly don't disagree that a facial tattoo is stupid, but the thing about a facial tattoo is that is may be saying "I exercised bad judgement 10 years ago", whereas sweatpants at the grocery store say "I'm exercising bad judgement RIGHT NOW". As such, it sure as hell doesn't make you an inherently better, smarter person than the guy with the facial tattoo.
  #46  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:50 PM
Sleeps With Butterflies Sleeps With Butterflies is offline
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Originally Posted by lexi View Post
Because of these factors what I see when I see someone with visible body art is:

1.) Someone who doesn't need or want a mainstream career.
2.) Someone who doesn't care about societal norms.
3.) Someone who isn't mature enough to know they are making a choice between a mainstream career & body art.

None of those 3 types of people are the type I'd hire to do my job although I may buy their next book or CD.
Disclaimer: I don't have any tattoos at all.

You seem to be doing a lot of assuming about why someone would or wouldn't have a tattoo and what that means about them.

How much of an ass would someone be if they said "Thank goodness I can see these fat people's fat bodies so I know not to hire them. They've chosen to not take care of their bodies and are probably lazy and have little impulse control. Why would I hire one of those people to work here?"

I can certainly understand being wary of hiring someone due to tattoos if the job would have them working with the public and you feel your client base would be offended. But to just assign characteristics to them (rebellious? really? is this 1950?) because of something as silly as a tattoo is really narrow minded and speaks more about you than you realize.
  #47  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:54 PM
lexi lexi is offline
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Originally Posted by Sleeps With Butterflies View Post
Disclaimer: I don't have any tattoos at all.

You seem to be doing a lot of assuming about why someone would or wouldn't have a tattoo and what that means about them.

How much of an ass would someone be if they said "Thank goodness I can see these fat people's fat bodies so I know not to hire them. They've chosen to not take care of their bodies and are probably lazy and have little impulse control. Why would I hire one of those people to work here?"

I can certainly understand being wary of hiring someone due to tattoos if the job would have them working with the public and you feel your client base would be offended. But to just assign characteristics to them (rebellious? really? is this 1950?) because of something as silly as a tattoo is really narrow minded and speaks more about you than you realize.
Nope - I said visible body art. Someone who loves body art, but is mature & cares about societal norms and wants a mainstream job will get tattoos in places where it can be covered.

And as Khaki Campbell said - people with visible tattoos don't give a shit what others think about their tattoos - isn't that the definition of rebellion?

Last edited by lexi; 01-28-2011 at 04:56 PM.
  #48  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:54 PM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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Great. Then they won't give a shit when I don't hire them because I think they look like someone who doesn't give a shit.
And you don't get it both ways. You don't get to "not give a shit about what people think" and then "whine about how you aren't accepted because of your individuality."

I have a friend who had long hair through his mid-30s. And had a hard time finding a good paying job. Which he blamed on "the man" who wouldn't accept his long hair.

Idealistically, you should be free to be the individual you are, to express yourself how you want, and everyone should be willing to accept that.

But corporate America (and a lot of other places) really aren't interested in you-as-individual while you do the job. They want you-as-employee. There is a risk out of the gate in hiring you. If you don't work out, they lose time. They may see an increase in unemployment insurance payments, they may see the impact in other employees productivity. For MOST jobs, given a choice, MOST hiring managers are going to go with the "low risk" choice. They applicant who doesn't seem likely to rock the boat. The one who is going to fit in. The one with the skills to do the job, and the attitude to do it even when the job sucks for a while.

So I get two similarly qualified applicants. And one shows up professionally dressed and groomed and looking like a good little corporate worker bee. And the other shows up sort of mussed in appearance, with long hair (on a guy) that says "I'm not a corporate drone." The problem is - what I'm hiring IS a corporate drone - or at least one willing to fake it for eight hours a day.
  #49  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:55 PM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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Originally Posted by Anaamika View Post
This made me laugh so hard I snorted water up my nose.
Its not mine - its a line from "Just Like Heaven."
  #50  
Old 01-28-2011, 04:56 PM
Kolga Kolga is offline
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And you don't get it both ways. You don't get to "not give a shit about what people think" and then "whine about how you aren't accepted because of your individuality."
This. I have acquaintances who are all noble and holier-than-thou about their alternative lifestyles (of various types) and how those lifestyles are so much more "real" and meaningful, and not selling out to the Man and the corporatization of the world. And then bitch because they don't have the consistent educational or employment history or the behavioral track record that employers are looking for.

Last edited by Kolga; 01-28-2011 at 04:57 PM.
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