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  #1  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:02 PM
TNWPsycho TNWPsycho is offline
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Does extreme couponing work?

I just saw the show by the same name on TLC last night. And it confused me, does this actually work? How exactly does it work?

THis is what i have in my mind. There is a coupon for $1 off Cheerios....and then the store has a special 10 for $10.

You get 10 $1 off coupons, and buy 10 boxes of Cheerios, so they are free.

Im thinking of getting into this....although not to the extreme as the shows.

My question is does this sort of thing actually work. Can i get $600 worth of groceries for $50?
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  #2  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:07 PM
Laggard Laggard is offline
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Sure it works. You combine sale items with coupons and a lot of stuff is almost free. Or you take advantage of double coupon days.

This weekend I got a coupon for 75 cents off cream cheese. It was on sale at the market for 99 cents. I paid a quarter.

Some of these people are silly though. What are you going to do with 300 toothbrushes?

Last edited by Laggard; 04-20-2011 at 03:08 PM..
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  #3  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:07 PM
MOIDALIZE MOIDALIZE is online now
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I've read impressive anecdotes of it working, but it seems to involve a lot of compromise and strategic shopping. There's a website whose name escapes me now that provides information on upcoming product specials at grocery stores in your area. The idea is to plan your shopping far in advance and stock up on certain goods when you can get the best bargain for them (which might entail buying 50 cans of soup, for example).

Last edited by MOIDALIZE; 04-20-2011 at 03:08 PM..
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  #4  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:09 PM
bouv bouv is offline
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Well, yes, it does work...some of the time. Obviously, the show isn't going to show you when they only save $10 on a $60 bill because they needed things like fresh produce, meats, dairy, etc... that go on sale less often and rarely have coupons compared to processed foods and sundries.

But if you've seen the show you know you'll need to put a LOT of time into it and have a LOT of space to store 1-5 years worth of stuff...some are morons and seem to buy things JUST BECAUSE it's a great deal and will only cost $0.25, so they get a hundred sticks of deodorant...nevermind if they will use that much deodorant in their whole lifetime...But others play smarter and don't save as much as a percentage of the pre-coupon total, but are probably less likely to waste things.

I did like that the one gentlemen who got like a thousand boxes of free cereal donated them...I wish more of them would do that when they get things for free/get paid to get them (they claim that "oh, it's on sale for $1, I have a $0.50 off coupon, and today is triple coupon day, so I get paid $0.50 to buy this!" but most stores have a policy that it can't go negative, ie it will be free and that's that.)

The first time I heard about this a few years ago I looked into it just for fun, and it really can't be done in certain areas. You need the right grocery stores, and the ones around me (Price Chopper, Shaws, Hannaford) aren't as good as other places. In fact, I think I saw a sign in Price Chopper the other day that said you're limited to three coupons for the same item per trip.

Last edited by bouv; 04-20-2011 at 03:11 PM..
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  #5  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:12 PM
Drunky Smurf Drunky Smurf is online now
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What I don't understand, I barely coupon but I do once in a while, and they always have a quantity limit to it. Like one box of cheeries per coupon. So where are they getting the other coupons? Do they buy ten newspapers to get the ten coupns? Does one store allow you to use multiple of the same coupon? I don't know but it seems like they would have to drive to ten different stores to get the ten different boxes of cheeries. So it seems like they would have to spend more money than just what they paid at the check-out.

Also isn't there some luck in this? Say there's a coupon for a box of cheeries but they aren't on sale during the couple of weeks the coupon is valid for so it seems kind of like a crapshoot.
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Old 04-20-2011, 03:26 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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The people on the show look a lot like hoarders.
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  #7  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:29 PM
silenus silenus is online now
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Proper planning. If you study a store's sale patterns, you can guess with some degree of accuracy when a particular type of good will go on sale. If you cross-reference that information with your coupons, you can maximise your savings.

As for the example of Cheerios, you just cut out 10 coupons. Plenty of papers laying around, not to mention the self-print coupons available online.
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  #8  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:30 PM
curious11 curious11 is offline
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A recent newspaper artical mentioned the woman, who is the star of the show, had the newspaper guy deliver all the undelivered newspapers (hee-hee) to her with the promise that she would recycle the newspaper after clipping out all the coupons.

Then she also would call the store ahead of time so she wouldn't be "wiping the shelves" clear of all items.

It wasn't clear to me that the savings covered her time spent clipping coupons and stratagizing her buying events. Obviously when you're broke and unemployed you have lots of time? Also it wasn't clear to me that she "stops," like maybe she is addicted on some level.
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  #9  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:58 PM
astro astro is offline
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It's fairly time intensive, and lot of people seem to wind up getting stuff they would never buy otherwise. Is it really a "savings" if you get a bunch of food you're not all that wild about? If you have a bunch of kids it would be worth doing. If you are a single adult the savings are less compelling relative to the time invested.
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  #10  
Old 04-20-2011, 03:58 PM
Laggard Laggard is offline
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Originally Posted by bouv View Post
stuff...some are morons and seem to buy things JUST BECAUSE it's a great deal and will only cost $0.25, so they get a hundred sticks of deodorant...nevermind if they will use that much deodorant in their whole lifetime....

I remember the cashier asking him what the hell he was going to do with two hundred sticks of deodorant.

Yes, some of them do seem like hoarders.

On the plus side I now know who the jerks are who wipe out entire sections of sale items.

Last edited by Laggard; 04-20-2011 at 03:59 PM..
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  #11  
Old 04-20-2011, 04:01 PM
Laggard Laggard is offline
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Originally Posted by Tahssa View Post
Also isn't there some luck in this? Say there's a coupon for a box of cheeries but they aren't on sale during the couple of weeks the coupon is valid for so it seems kind of like a crapshoot.
These people are extremely organized so they can cross-reference sale items with the coupons they have on hand.

They also will spend hours preparing for a shopping trip.
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  #12  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:24 PM
crowmanyclouds crowmanyclouds is offline
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Originally Posted by Tahssa View Post
... Also isn't there some luck in this? Say there's a coupon for a box of cheeries but they aren't on sale during the couple of weeks the coupon is valid for so it seems kind of like a crapshoot.
When I did cut a lot a coupons ($20 or $30 off a $200 or $300 order) the manufacturers coupons almost always corresponded with what was on sale at the store that week. I doubt it was a coincidence.

The real downside was going through all that to get the big national brand for the same price as the always cheaper brand. Then after some actual comparison, discovering that there really wasn't enough difference between the two products to justify the effort.
(Worse, sometimes the cheap stuff was really better!)

CMC fnord!
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  #13  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:32 PM
lazybratsche lazybratsche is offline
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Worse still, at least where I shop the "best deals" and readily available coupons are for things like Extreme Nacho Bacon Oreos, or other horrifying products that the grocery store is desperately trying to move. I think I'll pass...
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  #14  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:33 PM
thirdname thirdname is offline
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Worst X-Games event ever.
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  #15  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:39 PM
dracoi dracoi is offline
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It does work, but I do have one major nit to pick with extreme couponing. They always calculate the savings from the highest retail price rather than the price they would actually pay. Thus, they're not looking at the additional/marginal savings produced by their clipping.

For example, most grocery stores already offer cheaper "member" prices if you show your store card at the register. If any guy with a card can get a $2.00 item for $1.50, then an extreme coupon deal that knocks it down to $0.50 has only saved $1.00 - not $1.50.

Now, I do understand why they use the full retail price to calculate their savings - it's the only simple and reliable way to do it. But to justify 10 hours of coupon clipping with $500 of savings is misleading if you'd have got $200 off without any work at all.
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  #16  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:41 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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The one episode I saw specifically said that the total reflected coupons, loyalty card prices and in store sales, but they didn't specifically how much was due to coupons. I save a ton if you count loyalty card "savings".
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  #17  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:44 PM
RedSwinglineOne RedSwinglineOne is offline
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Originally Posted by Tahssa View Post
So where are they getting the other coupons? Do they buy ten newspapers to get the ten coupns? Does one store allow you to use multiple of the same coupon?
One woman on the show climbed through dumpsters. Another spent hours a day walking around grabbing 'unwanted' newspapers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by curious11 View Post
It wasn't clear to me that the savings covered her time spent clipping coupons and stratagizing her buying events. .
One woman said she spends 60+ hours a week couponing, plus having to go shopping several times a week to get each item at the correct store.

While I'm sure these people get good deals all the time, I'm sure they only buy the stuff they can get the best deals on when the camera is following them. 200 boxes of pasta and 100 bottles of hand cleaner?! Congratulations...
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  #18  
Old 04-20-2011, 05:55 PM
LurkMeister LurkMeister is offline
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I watched a few episodes of this but decided to stop because I was spending too much time yelling at my TV. One woman was buying like 50 jars of mustard, and her husband commented that he didn't even like mustard. Another woman was using a store coupon that gave her money off for buying $50 worth of groceries, and after she got to the store she found out that the coupons were only good for one use per customer, so she's calling all her friends to find people who can come to the store and use the extra coupons for her purchases.

Some of the people mentioned buying coupons online, but the show wasn't taking the cost of the coupons into account when announcing their savings.

Also, some of these people must be living someplace that doesn't charge sales tax for food. How else are they paying only $50 for $1000 worth of food? All the stores I shop at the sales tax is figured on the cost of the purchases before the coupons are deducted.
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  #19  
Old 04-20-2011, 06:03 PM
miracatta miracatta is offline
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The Summer of Free Cat Food

A few years ago, our supermarket had double coupons, and I had many coupons for a bag of dry cat food. At the time, the coupons got doubled, and when they did, the food was free.
It took an entire evening, but I went from store to store buying three bags each of the cat food (store had limit of doubling three like coupons). There were many of these bags, enough so that my 4 cats ate their dry food free all that summer. I still paid for their wet food.
Now, however, the supermarket is recovering from a bruising strike and subsequent federal indictment, and double couponning is a thing of the past. Sad. But it was great while it lasted, to the tune of about $3000. per year.
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  #20  
Old 04-20-2011, 06:06 PM
friedo friedo is online now
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Sales tax for food? Do you live in Zimbabwe?
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  #21  
Old 04-20-2011, 06:15 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Huh. I thought all coupons said "one per customer" or "not valid in conjunction with anything else" or some such.
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  #22  
Old 04-20-2011, 06:17 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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The one episode I saw the person had to break their order into multiple precisely planned transactions- like 18 or something- to avoid the "one per customer etc" rules! It took an hour to checkout.

Last edited by IvoryTowerDenizen; 04-20-2011 at 06:17 PM..
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  #23  
Old 04-20-2011, 07:07 PM
campp campp is offline
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It also helps immensely if you can properly organize and access your coupon collection. I think it almost becomes like a high-strategy game to some people.
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  #24  
Old 04-20-2011, 07:40 PM
kunilou kunilou is offline
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Originally Posted by friedo View Post
Sales tax for food? Do you live in Zimbabwe?
I pay sales tax on food, and I live in Missouri (no Zimbabwe jokes, please!) Also, our local grocers have eliminated out of town competition (we don't have a Kroger, Safeway, Albertson or any other chain you can name), and they don't have affinity cards and they haven't had double-couponing since sometime in the 1980s. In other words, if I have a 25 cent coupon for peanut butter, I save exactly 25 cents.

We're Missourians. We don't do extreme anything.
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  #25  
Old 04-20-2011, 07:50 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Most places I've lived (in the US), grocery stores don't tax food. But, what is considered "food" varies from state to state I imagine.

It's like how you can buy lots of types of food with food assistance cards, but not fresh, pre-wrapped subway sandwiches or take away pizza etc. I think.
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  #26  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:03 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is online now
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My thinking on coupons is that the coupon has to be for something you would have bought anyway. If you buy something that you would not have bought normally, they win. Which means you lose.
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  #27  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:20 PM
RachelChristine RachelChristine is offline
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One of my friends that does couponing (she calls it Savvy Saving) says she spends 1-2 hours a week clipping and planning. She does have to shop at 4 different stores to do it, but has a system of babysitting worked out with her husband. Some of what she says makes a lot of sense. For example, if you start watching the sale flyers, you can find their pattern. She said that most stores in our area are on a 6 week rotation, so she buys all the chicken she'll need for six weeks the week it's on sale, and puts it in her freezer. Then pork chops the next week (or whatever). I thought that was neat.

One thing she also said, that just seems weird, but she showed me a receipt... She bought 14 jugs of laundry detergent for free (probably paid sales tax, I don't remember). She had a manufacturer's coupon for buy one get one free, and found a store (Walgreens?) that was having a buy one get one free sale. She said that she "bought" seven with her coupon to get the second seven free, but she "bought" them with the sale to get the first seven free.
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  #28  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:28 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Double couponing is almost required to get the huge savings, and unfortunately, there isn't anywhere near me that has double coupon days. I'll try to combine manufacturer and store coupons when I can, though.
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  #29  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:29 PM
LurkMeister LurkMeister is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by friedo View Post
Sales tax for food? Do you live in Zimbabwe?
Quote:
Originally Posted by kunilou View Post
I pay sales tax on food, and I live in Missouri (no Zimbabwe jokes, please!) Also, our local grocers have eliminated out of town competition (we don't have a Kroger, Safeway, Albertson or any other chain you can name), and they don't have affinity cards and they haven't had double-couponing since sometime in the 1980s. In other words, if I have a 25 cent coupon for peanut butter, I save exactly 25 cents.

We're Missourians. We don't do extreme anything.
I know there was sales tax on food in Chicago when I lived there, and I pay 2% on food here. However, the Harris Teeter I shop at not only routinely doubles all coupons up to 99 cents, they occasionally double them up to $1.98. Once in a while they used to triple coupons, although it's been a while and it's possible that's been discontinued. And once a month or so they will have some items for buy 2 get 3 free, which is when I stock up.
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  #30  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:34 PM
GythaOgg GythaOgg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kunilou View Post
I pay sales tax on food, and I live in Missouri (no Zimbabwe jokes, please!) Also, our local grocers have eliminated out of town competition (we don't have a Kroger, Safeway, Albertson or any other chain you can name), and they don't have affinity cards and they haven't had double-couponing since sometime in the 1980s. In other words, if I have a 25 cent coupon for peanut butter, I save exactly 25 cents.

We're Missourians. We don't do extreme anything.
This. You really cannot do 'extreme coupon' shopping here. The major chain is Schnucks, a locally-owned operation and they don't do special programs. The other local chain is Dierberg's, which is regarded by locals as a more 'luxury level' store with more expensive goods. We DO have a few discount chains like Shop-N-Save, and some specialty places like Trader Joe's, but they're few and far between. Schnucks is the big game, and they did, literally, push Kroger out of business here some years back.

Walmart and Target here have just started carrying grocery, but none of the locals expect this to last for very long and most won't shop for groceries there. It's a very local attitude.
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  #31  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:34 PM
XT XT is offline
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Watching the show and having read about this before, it seems like a waste to me...and also it's a bit misleading, as others have alluded to. I mean, if it takes me 20 hours of work (it seems to actually take more) to get a few hundred dollars worth of mostly useless goods, have I really saved all that much? 20 hours of my time is worth...well, more than a few hundred dollars in savings on things like 200 sticks of deodorant that I'll most likely never use, or a few hundred cans of soup I might eat in several years of time, or boxes and boxes of Cheerios that might get eaten or might go stale sitting on a shelf.

You'd have to consider what your time is worth, and whether you REALLY need all the crap that these guys generally take home on the show. To me...it's definitely not worth it. That isn't to say that my wife and I never use coupons...we do.

-XT
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  #32  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:39 PM
GythaOgg GythaOgg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by levdrakon View Post
Most places I've lived (in the US), grocery stores don't tax food. But, what is considered "food" varies from state to state I imagine.

It's like how you can buy lots of types of food with food assistance cards, but not fresh, pre-wrapped subway sandwiches or take away pizza etc. I think.
At least in the St. Louis area, we pay full sales tax on food items whether at the grocery or in a restaurant. Most of my life I'd never heard that there are some places where folks don't pay sales tax on food! I guess what is 'strange' varies according to what you're used to locally.
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  #33  
Old 04-20-2011, 08:55 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Originally Posted by GythaOgg View Post
At least in the St. Louis area, we pay full sales tax on food items whether at the grocery or in a restaurant. Most of my life I'd never heard that there are some places where folks don't pay sales tax on food! I guess what is 'strange' varies according to what you're used to locally.
Missouri? It looks like they lowered your food taxes significantly.

I just found this too. It appears taxing groceries in the US is rarer than not, at least at the state level.
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  #34  
Old 04-20-2011, 09:00 PM
Shirley Knott Shirley Knott is offline
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Not sure how it works in the US or other parts of the world, in the UK we have 'loyalty cards'; for every 1 you spend you can 'save' 1 point which usually equals between 1p and 10p. A big name supermarket in England was once selling bananas and rewarding you with (as I recall) 100 loyalty points per kilo. Bananas were 40p a kilo which meant that the store was giving you 60p to take them away... at least one person was banned from the store for buying over 100 kilo of bananas, making a profit of 60 plus whatever he sold the bananas for.
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  #35  
Old 04-20-2011, 09:06 PM
Shirley Knott Shirley Knott is offline
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Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
My thinking on coupons is that the coupon has to be for something you would have bought anyway. If you buy something that you would not have bought normally, they win. Which means you lose.

A bargain to a woman is anything that they buy for half price... A bargain to a man is something he needs no matter how much it costs him.
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  #36  
Old 04-20-2011, 11:26 PM
rogerbox rogerbox is offline
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Really, really stupid question here... what is this "double" and "triple" couponing you speak of? I assume it means you can use two coupons per deal or something, but I rarely use coupons and when I do, I have NEVER in my life seen a coupon that doesn't say it doesn't work with any other coupon.

So can you guys explain this concept to me like I'm slow? My best guess is the store lets you ignore the limit one coupon per item line on the coupon, but I doubt thats correct.
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  #37  
Old 04-20-2011, 11:36 PM
Palooka Palooka is online now
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It's that your $0.50 off coupon is counted as $1.00 off or $1.50 off.
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  #38  
Old 04-20-2011, 11:47 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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I don't extreme coupon, but the wife of one of my friends does this, and seems to make out pretty well. They've got two kids and are on a tight budgets, so it seems to work out well for them. She even teaches a class on it every so often. Extra free stuff she can't use, she turns into the local food pantry, so it's not like she's hording a bunch of crap. I've seen the receipts from her purchases, and it's rather amazing. One example is she was able to get 30 jars of Skippy peanut butter for absolutely free. She has two kids, so she'll get through them, and, if there's danger she doesn't, she'll just give it to the food pantry.

Anyhow, I did give it a shot one day, and was pretty impressed. I managed to buy 2 14-oz boxes of Rice Krispies, along with 1 14-oz box of Special K, for $4, along with a gallon of free milk, and a coupon for free M&Ms (up to a value of $2), which I didn't even bother using. For me, that was all useful stuff, and what I would have normally paid something like $12 for, all for four bucks. And, like I said, I didn't even bother getting the free M&Ms, because I don't really eat sweets. Works for me. One day, at Target I managed to get 20 Lean Cuisine or Weight Watchers frozen dinners (I forget which one) down to $1 a dinner, only using coupons I found at the store and taking into account the deals they had going on. This is something I eat all the time, and normally I pay around $2/box for. It's not quite extreme couponing, but I was pretty proud of myself for finding such a deal for something I regularly use.

Here's a fun read of a guy who decided to give himself a $1/day challenge, to see just what he could do and eat with that limited budget. The final tally had him buying about $600 worth of products for $27, along with almost $4 in unspent credits. If you look at what he got for that, it's actually not all that bad. Not the most balanced diet, but not a diet of crap you wouldn't want to eat.
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  #39  
Old 04-20-2011, 11:53 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by rogerbox View Post
Really, really stupid question here... what is this "double" and "triple" couponing you speak of? I assume it means you can use two coupons per deal or something, but I rarely use coupons and when I do, I have NEVER in my life seen a coupon that doesn't say it doesn't work with any other coupon.
Using a manufacturer's coupon with a store coupon should not be a problem, and why should it be? The store gets the value of the manufacturer's coupon back from the manufacturer (plus usually 8 cents for processing.) It may be a pain in the ass for the store to process all the coupons they get, but they're going to get manufacturers coupons either way, so it shouldn't really make any difference to them whether a coupon is stacked or not.

Last edited by pulykamell; 04-20-2011 at 11:54 PM..
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  #40  
Old 04-21-2011, 12:02 AM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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My mom coupons and sale-hunts pretty heavily, though probably far short of what you'd see on TV. She's practiced at it and probably doesn't actually spend significantly more time on grocery shopping than most folks, though there's a steep learning curve. For instance, she shops at at least a half-dozen different grocery stores on a regular basis, buying only the deep-discount loss-leaders at each, but that doesn't mean she makes six times as many trips to the store: She's got it worked out to where she makes about the same number of total trips, and buys about the same total amount per trip, and just keeps things stockpiled in the freezer or the cellar. This also has the fortuitous side-effect that, if some disaster fell, she'd be able to live off of her stockpile for quite a while, but that's not the primary reason she does it. Nor is she a hoarder: She only buys things that she'll use eventually (i.e., before they would go bad), and keeps her stock in rotation. And she also doesn't put much extra mileage on the car from going to stores other than the one closest to the house: She always schedules her grocery shopping for when she's already in the area doing something else anyway, so it's just a little out of her way. This is another benefit of the large stockpile: She has more flexibility in when she goes shopping, since she's almost never in the situation of needing something right now and not having it on hand.
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  #41  
Old 04-21-2011, 12:29 AM
Jophiel Jophiel is online now
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Originally Posted by LurkMeister View Post
I know there was sales tax on food in Chicago when I lived there, and I pay 2% on food here.
Here in Chicago suburbia, I pay tax but it's a pretty nominal amount. 1.25% I think. Some food items (some snacks, sodas, etc) get taxed at the standard rate but not all of them. I usually wind up with two or three food items that were taxed standard and the rest at the lower rate.
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  #42  
Old 04-21-2011, 01:04 AM
Eyebrows 0f Doom Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
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Originally Posted by xtisme View Post
I mean, if it takes me 20 hours of work (it seems to actually take more) to get a few hundred dollars worth of mostly useless goods, have I really saved all that much? 20 hours of my time is worth...well, more than a few hundred dollars in savings on things like 200 sticks of deodorant that I'll most likely never use,
That's not really true though, even though people say things like that often. If you're looking for coupons instead of going to work, then your time is worth what you're losing at work, but your time before and after work hours is worth $0.

Last edited by Eyebrows 0f Doom; 04-21-2011 at 01:04 AM..
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Old 04-21-2011, 01:30 AM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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I have a bad feeling the TLC program will ruin this for everyone. If fifty times as many people flood the stores with coupons the store managers won't be happy. The extra checkout time costs them money. They can't be happy seeing $200 worth of groceries go out the door for $50 and a fistful of coupons. If two or three people do it a day that's ok. But, 20 people a day??? That's a major PITA for the store.

Most coupons wind up in the trash and the various companies know that. If too many people start using them then the companies may change the rules on future coupons. Or at least enforce limits on how many coupons can be used at checkout time.

Last edited by aceplace57; 04-21-2011 at 01:34 AM..
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Old 04-21-2011, 05:54 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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I'd bet money the worst-affected stores will eliminate double-couponing if it gets that bad. In the Chicago area, as far as I can tell, the two largest supermarket chains (Jewel and Dominick's) already don't have double coupon days.

Last edited by Ferret Herder; 04-21-2011 at 05:55 AM..
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Old 04-21-2011, 06:29 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Things must work very differently in the US. Here in the UK, pretty much every coupon I've seen says "Only one coupon to be used per customer" and "Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion". And I've never come across "double couponing" at all.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:16 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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In the US, if you find a newspaper coupon for 30 cents off cereal, you can't grab multiple copies of that exact coupon and expect to get a free box of cereal. However, there are other savings you might be able to "stack" on the same item.

For instance, some stores issue their own coupons for certain products. You can use one manufacturer coupon and one store coupon on each item, assuming you're lucky enough to find them.

Then stores may have special sales prices on various items. You can still use any coupons that you might have along with the sale.

Certain stores may have, tied to their loyalty card programs, vouchers for, say, $10 off your next order of $25 or more.

Finally, IIRC some stores will designate one day a week/month - typically a slow day - as "double coupon" days. They'll take any manufacturer coupons that you're using and double the savings. Many of these places will put an upper limit of $1 or so on the largest coupon they'll double.

I think the best I've done on a single item is getting some nice body wash for about half off, by saving a manufacturer coupon and finding a store coupon as well, and using both at the same time.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:03 AM
LurkMeister LurkMeister is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I have a bad feeling the TLC program will ruin this for everyone. If fifty times as many people flood the stores with coupons the store managers won't be happy. The extra checkout time costs them money. They can't be happy seeing $200 worth of groceries go out the door for $50 and a fistful of coupons. If two or three people do it a day that's ok. But, 20 people a day??? That's a major PITA for the store.

Most coupons wind up in the trash and the various companies know that. If too many people start using them then the companies may change the rules on future coupons. Or at least enforce limits on how many coupons can be used at checkout time.
As I mentioned before, the Harris Teeter where I shop does double coupons up to 99 cents every day, When they have what they call "Super Double Coupon Week" and double coupons up to $1.98 there is a limit of 20 coupons per customer per visit.

I've also noticed that a lot of the manufacturers coupons are now marked "do not double or triple" but Harris Teeter still does it. I'm assuming that HT swallows the difference. Also, a lot of stores disregard the expiration dates on the coupons (although not always). Last week HT had Helluva Good cheese on sale, 8 oz packages at 2/$4. I bought two packages and used two expired coupons for 55 cents off, both of which were accepted and doubled, so I got them for 90 cents each.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:09 AM
bouv bouv is offline
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Originally Posted by Ferret Herder View Post
In the US, if you find a newspaper coupon for 30 cents off cereal, you can't grab multiple copies of that exact coupon and expect to get a free box of cereal.
That's true, but plenty of stores let you use five coupons for five boxes, or ten for ten, and like you said, if each one can also stack with an in-store special, a store coupon, a double-coupon day, etc... then it can bring all of them down to free or nearly free.

Like I said earlier, none of the stores around me work well for extreme couponing. The one I shop at most (Price Chopper,) doesn't have double or triple coupon days, but the do issue "triple coupon coupons" in their flyer. That is to say, in their sales flyer are store coupons that you cut out (there's maybe ten per flyer?) and each one of those will triple any one coupon you have, I think up to $1? (That is to say, the orignal coupon's value is up to a $1, so after tripling, is worth $3.) And I don't think they let you triple more coupns than that...so even if you get two flyers and have twenty triple coupon coupons, I think you can still only use ten (or whatever the amount in the flyer is.)
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:15 AM
BetsQ BetsQ is offline
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Originally Posted by kunilou View Post
We're Missourians. We don't do extreme anything.
As someone who grew up in the St. Louis area, this is the best thing I've read all week.
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:45 AM
RedSwinglineOne RedSwinglineOne is offline
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Originally Posted by Eyebrows 0f Doom View Post
That's not really true though, even though people say things like that often. If you're looking for coupons instead of going to work, then your time is worth what you're losing at work, but your time before and after work hours is worth $0.
I understand why you are saying this, but it is not really true either. Do really consider your non-working time worthless? I'm sure you don't. And if you had to assign a dollar value to your free time, it would probably be about what you earn at your job. If you earned $1000/week, would you think it was worth spending a whole Saturday to save $50? Probably not. But suppose you only made $200/week? Then you probably would.
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