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  #1  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:12 PM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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What will Obama do after his presidency?

He'll be either 51 or 55, too young for retirement. Public speaker seems a bit passive. Run for senate? Practice law? Become a full time dad and househusband? I like option #3.
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  #2  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:28 PM
Shodan Shodan is offline
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Write another book or two. Teach part-time. Pretty much what he did before he became President.

Regards,
Shodan
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  #3  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:33 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Somebody has to say it, so I will: "Go back to Kenya."

Bill Clinton was slightly younger than Obama when he was elected, and I think you could expect Obama to do some similar things: work on whatever global or largely nonpartisan issues are close to his heart, that kind of thing. Clinton has made a fortune on the lecture circuit and made a lot of money from his memoir; Obama's already signed a book deal for his. I'm not sure he likes to hear himself talk quite as much as Clinton does and I am positive he doesn't like to live it up as much, but he'll do some public speaking. Once you're done as president you're generally done with electoral politics, so I wouldn't expect him to run for any other office. I don't think he ever practiced law very much and that would be a strange time to start.
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  #4  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:36 PM
Ephemera Ephemera is offline
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He'll suspend the Constitution and become General Secretary of the United Socialist States.
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  #5  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:37 PM
Diogenes the Cynic Diogenes the Cynic is offline
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He was a US Senator before he became president and an Illinois State Senator before that, and a civil rights attorney and a Professor of Constitutional law before that.


After his Presidency, I would expect Obama to do much the same as Bill Clinton has. Write books, speak publicly and throw his weight behind international causes
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  #6  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:41 PM
StusBlues StusBlues is offline
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I'm pretty much in agreement with Marley, though he'll probably keep a higher profile than Clinton has since he (probably) won't have anatomical details of his personal transgressions zipping about the internet.

Dark horse possibility: if succeeded by a Democrat, he MAY follow William Howard Taft's example and serve on the supreme court. I kind of doubt it, though; I don't think he wants to be tied to Washington so intensely.

Last edited by StusBlues; 04-22-2011 at 12:42 PM..
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  #7  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:43 PM
cuauhtemoc cuauhtemoc is offline
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Originally Posted by Hades View Post
He'll suspend the Constitution and become General Secretary of the United Socialist States.
Don't you mean "Emir of The Islamic Republic of North America?"
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  #8  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:50 PM
Lantern Lantern is online now
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I wonder if he has any ambition to become Secretary General of the UN. Not nearly as powerful as POTUS, but a charismatic global leader like Obama could re-define the institution and make it a lot more influential.
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  #9  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:51 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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If he wants to, he could certainly become a university president or run a large non-profit like the NAACP. I'm sure that he'll get offers from many universities and non-governmental organizations. (And another question is what will his wife do? She's about as well-qualified as he is and would offer a similar amount of prestige for an organization.)
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  #10  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:55 PM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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Originally Posted by Biggirl View Post
He'll be either 51 or 55, too young for retirement.
Says who?
Most ex-presidents go into a sort of semi-retirement. As others have said, he'll probably write and give speeches. I imagine he'll find some charitable causes he believes in and spend some time on those.

True, he doesn't seem like the type to sit around in a rocking chair, but I doubt if he'll need to launch a whole new career or anything.
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  #11  
Old 04-22-2011, 01:10 PM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StusBlues View Post
I'm pretty much in agreement with Marley, though he'll probably keep a higher profile than Clinton has since he (probably) won't have anatomical details of his personal transgressions zipping about the internet.

Dark horse possibility: if succeeded by a Democrat, he MAY follow William Howard Taft's example and serve on the supreme court. I kind of doubt it, though; I don't think he wants to be tied to Washington so intensely.
That's true that he won't have that hanging over him. As far as the Supreme Court goes- who knows what the political climate will be like any time over the next decade, but I think it's unlikely an ex-president would be nominated. The trend lately has been to nominate judges with as little record as possible so that record can't be used against them. That doesn't quite work for a former president. There's also the pattern of nominating younger justices. The last four have been nominated at age 50 to 55, the idea being they could serve 30 years or so if they wanted. Obama might be in office until he's 56 and I assume he'd want some time off if anything like this ever came up. But the idea of him serving with a few justices he nominated (two so far) and two he voted against is entertaining. That's almost a sitcom right there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lantern View Post
I wonder if he has any ambition to become Secretary General of the UN. Not nearly as powerful as POTUS, but a charismatic global leader like Obama could re-define the institution and make it a lot more influential.
People floated this talk about Clinton, too. It's hard to imagine other countries wanting the U.S. to have that much sway in the UN.
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  #12  
Old 04-22-2011, 01:20 PM
The Great Sun Jester The Great Sun Jester is offline
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Interesting thread. I'm thinking he'll do what other Dem ex-presidents do: throw himself into his pet international cause--probably heading up some kind of global peace/love/understanding gig like The Elders and occasionally make a coincidental trip to Egypt or Iran or Mongolia where he'll just happen to secure the release of some young CIA operatives who were captured when they blew their "innocent college-age hikers" cover. Unlike his predecessor, who successfully pissed off/alienated nearly every world leader he dealt with, I would expect Mr. Obama to frequently reap the rewards of not badgering & belittling his less financially & politically secure counterparts.
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  #13  
Old 04-22-2011, 01:24 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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One idea nobodies posited: Chair the DNC.
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  #14  
Old 04-22-2011, 02:33 PM
appleciders appleciders is offline
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Originally Posted by StusBlues View Post
Dark horse possibility: if succeeded by a Democrat, he MAY follow William Howard Taft's example and serve on the supreme court. I kind of doubt it, though; I don't think he wants to be tied to Washington so intensely.
I tend to think that he's more likely than not to accept if a president who follows him nominates him, but I'm not sure he'd be nominated. He's ambitious and has a real desire to be a mover and shaker in government-- you don't run for President otherwise! It'd require a Democratic President and Senate to even have a prayer, and I wonder how likely that is in 2017. He'd have to leave office with high approval ratings, too, and in this polarized climate I think it's unlikely. If he left at age 55 and wasn't appointed for another four years, he'd be 59 or 60 before he put on the robes. That's a little old for a SCOTUS appointment; presidents like to appoint young justices who will spend decades on the court. Sotomayor was 55 and Kagan was 50 when sworn in. I think he's a little bit too polarizing* to get confirmed except in a very pro-Democratic year. I do think that he'd do a good job, though; he's taught Constitutional law and he probably wouldn't have concurred in Citizens United, which is enough for me to consider him further.


*A criticism of the current political climate, not Obama himself.
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  #15  
Old 04-22-2011, 02:56 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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President Clinton will nominate him for the Supreme Court.
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  #16  
Old 04-22-2011, 03:42 PM
The Great Sun Jester The Great Sun Jester is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
President Clinton will nominate him for the Supreme Court.
yyyyyyeeeaahhh...gonna have to say I'm hopin' against parts of that sentiment. Unless they can find a loophole to get Slick Willie back behind the desk.
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  #17  
Old 04-22-2011, 03:50 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
...People floated this talk about Clinton, too. It's hard to imagine other countries wanting the U.S. to have that much sway in the UN.
Isn't there an unwritten rule that the Secretary-General cannot from the 5 permanent members of the Security Council (the US, UK, France, Russia, or China)?
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  #18  
Old 04-23-2011, 01:44 PM
snowmaster snowmaster is offline
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Hopefully, enjoy residing in Chicago again in late winter of 2013.

Seriously? Hard to say. I find the political careers of past presidents fascinating.

If he sees a very strong Dem year coming and has a Dem Pres in office, I bet he gets the President to make his district's congressman Secretary of Whogivesashit, runs for the House again and makes a big play to be speaker.

If there are at least 8 years of Republican administration(s) and congressional elections mostly favor the GOP, he fades into obscurity, as much as a former Pres can.
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  #19  
Old 04-23-2011, 02:53 PM
Simplicio Simplicio is offline
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Yea, Bush I, Clinton and Bush II seem to all retired to careers of more or less uncontroversial international do-goodery. No one seems to leave the Presidency with a burning desire to jump back into the fray of domestic politics. I guess Clinton has remained active as a fundraiser and campaigner for his wife, but he doesn't seem to be spoilering for any sort of official position.
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  #20  
Old 04-23-2011, 08:54 PM
Least Original User Name Ever Least Original User Name Ever is offline
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Originally Posted by Inigo Montoya View Post
yyyyyyeeeaahhh...gonna have to say I'm hopin' against parts of that sentiment. Unless they can find a loophole to get Slick Willie back behind the desk.

There's another Clinton you might have heard of.
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  #21  
Old 04-23-2011, 09:01 PM
Rigamarole Rigamarole is offline
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What every ex-President does... write another book or two, some speaking engagements here and there to remind people he's still alive and add to his already vast wealth, and enjoy his fat mountain of cash.

Wouldn't you?
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  #22  
Old 04-24-2011, 02:04 AM
EvilTOJ EvilTOJ is offline
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There's another Clinton you might have heard of.
I didn't even know George Clinton was interested in politics.
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  #23  
Old 04-24-2011, 04:56 PM
42fish 42fish is offline
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I didn't even know George Clinton was interested in politics.
Heck, he even outlined his potential cabinet in "Chocolate City." Granted, it will need some revising since his Secretary of the Treasury (Rev. Ike) and Minister of Education (Richard Pryor) are gone now, but still...
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  #24  
Old 04-24-2011, 07:24 PM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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I didn't even know George Clinton was interested in politics.
Wasn't he Lord Speaker, or was it Speaker of the House of Commons?
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  #25  
Old 04-26-2011, 08:29 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Write another book or two.
Shodan stole my answer. Of course he'll write another book. They all write books.
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  #26  
Old 04-27-2011, 09:31 AM
Munch Munch is offline
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Originally Posted by Least Original User Name Ever View Post
There's another Clinton you might have heard of.
And that would be the sentiment Inigo was hoping against.
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  #27  
Old 04-27-2011, 11:42 AM
Marley23 Marley23 is offline
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Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
Isn't there an unwritten rule that the Secretary-General cannot from the 5 permanent members of the Security Council (the US, UK, France, Russia, or China)?
Yes. When people started asking if Bill Clinton might become Secretary-General I thought there was an official on-the-books rule against it, but there isn't. But the security council nations can veto a candidate, and for a long time, there has been an unofficial rotation of continents - Kofi Annan is from Africa and it was understood the next secretary (Moon) was almost certainly going to be Asian. Somebody would have to give up their turn for Obama to have a chance.
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  #28  
Old 04-27-2011, 01:03 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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Originally Posted by Marley23 View Post
Yes. When people started asking if Bill Clinton might become Secretary-General I thought there was an official on-the-books rule against it, but there isn't. But the security council nations can veto a candidate, and for a long time, there has been an unofficial rotation of continents - Kofi Annan is from Africa and it was understood the next secretary (Moon) was almost certainly going to be Asian. Somebody would have to give up their turn for Obama to have a chance.
Is South America next in the rotation?
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  #29  
Old 04-27-2011, 04:43 PM
Marc Xenos Marc Xenos is offline
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Originally Posted by Biggirl View Post
What will Obama do after his presidency?
"Would you like fries with that?"
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  #30  
Old 04-27-2011, 04:54 PM
Simplicio Simplicio is offline
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I don't really think Obama or any other ex-President would want the Sec-Generalship. Its a job where

a) everyone blames you when ever anything horrible happens anywhere in the world and
b) your powers to actually do anything about said horrible things is limited to making minor changes in how UNICEF aid money gets distributed.

Its the kind of job that can only make you look worse.

Also, I don't think there is a "rotation". Africa had the post twice in a row before the current (Asian) occupant
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