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  #1  
Old 05-04-2011, 11:35 AM
Spoonbender Spoonbender is offline
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Prospective employer asking your current salary

I would appreciate anyone's opinion on this common problem.

I'm employed but in the market for a new job. It's white-collar and there is a lot of variation in salary for this type of position. I've found that a large percentage of employers and recruiters insist on me telling them my current salary. I've been able to stall them so far, but they all say they will "need to know" that information before an offer is made.

I know that the standard answer to this is that it's none of their business and you should deflect the question by telling them what you're asking for rather than what you're making. This tactic has never worked for me. They still demand to know my current salary.

So far no one has given a reasonable explanation as to why they need to know this. Unfortunately, I'm working a lot with recruiters, and the recruiter's excuse is always that the employer "needs" to know, and the reasons why are not the recruiter's problem.

I have nothing to hide about my current salary, I just object in principle, and I don't want to worsen my negotiating position.

I know that in principle they shouldn't ask and I shouldn't answer, but does anyone out there have real-world experience with this dilemma? Has anyone either successfully avoided giving out this information, or lost out on a job opportunity because you stuck to your guns?
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  #2  
Old 05-04-2011, 11:53 AM
don't ask don't ask is offline
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I can see your problem but I have never come across the problem in recruiting, I never ask that.

My immediate inclination would be to make it their problem, "What, you don't think you can afford me? What salary did you have in mind?"

But as I say, I have no idea, that is just how I would respond.

Because I don't give a shit. There are lots of jobs out there.
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  #3  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:02 PM
campp campp is offline
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Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
I can see your problem but I have never come across the problem in recruiting, I never ask that.

My immediate inclination would be to make it their problem, "What, you don't think you can afford me? What salary did you have in mind?"

But as I say, I have no idea, that is just how I would respond.

Because I don't give a shit. There are lots of jobs out there.
Really? I'm moving to Australia. There sure as hell aren't "lots of jobs" here in the American Southwest.
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  #4  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:04 PM
Chessic Sense Chessic Sense is offline
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"Currently, I make [truthful] but I've had offers from [your competitors] for [what I'm asking]."
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  #5  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:12 PM
Cubsfan Cubsfan is offline
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Just lie and tell them its just below what you're asking. How would they ever know the difference. Do you also have to provide a paystub?
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  #6  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:15 PM
Oredigger77 Oredigger77 is offline
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I lie. Typically i'll give them a number that is a range where a 10% would put me in the salery i want from my new job.
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  #7  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:17 PM
Giles Giles is offline
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"I'll tell you if you tell me what people doing similar work earn at your company."
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  #8  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:19 PM
Spoonbender Spoonbender is offline
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Originally Posted by Chessic Sense View Post
"Currently, I make [truthful] but I've had offers from [your competitors] for [what I'm asking]."
Interesting tactic...it solves the problem of not hurting your negotiating position, but it doesn't solve the privacy issue. Plus you have to be able to convincingly lie about the other offers.
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  #9  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:22 PM
Spoonbender Spoonbender is offline
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Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
Just lie and tell them its just below what you're asking. How would they ever know the difference. Do you also have to provide a paystub?
I've had at least one recruiter say they wanted to see a W-2. I'm not working with that recruiter anymore, but it's early in the process and I imagine others will make the same demand.
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  #10  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:32 PM
TimeWinder TimeWinder is offline
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Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
Just lie and tell them its just below what you're asking. How would they ever know the difference. Do you also have to provide a paystub?
Because when they do the pre-employment background check, this information is often part of it (no, I don't know how they get it, but on mine, it was accurate to the dollar). And many HR departments won't give a salary for an ex-employee, but they will confirm or deny one.

Lying to a potential employer is a really bad idea in the long run; in virtually every company, it's grounds for termination if discovered later.

Just call their bluff and tell them you don't feel comfortable sharing, but realize you may not get an offer. Or tell them the truth, and have reasons for negotiating up if the offer's too low (they want it because they're going to offer you your existing salary + x%, of course, but that's just a first offer).
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  #11  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:37 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Salary is difficult for people to deal with. Recruiters and hiring companies are often looking for a way out of evaluating a candidate's skills and abilities and just want to work incrementally off your current salary. This becomes a problem if you are making less than you think you should be and don't want a lowball offer, or you're making too much and don't want to be rejected as too expensive.

So do your homework, find out what you should be making for your job in your location. Look at the middle of the range if you find some statistics. Everybody thinks they belong at the top end, but this wouldn't be an issue if you were demonstrably the best at what you do. Take the information you have and tell those guys what salary you are looking for. They really are looking primarily for a number.

There are hirers who work on the philosophy that any new employee should start at a small increment over what they were making before. Don't fall for this. State your number, and the reasons why, and stick to it.

It is incredibly important to set your salary as high as possible when you start a new job. Most increases are based on a percentage of your salary, so you want the base to be as much as you can get. It will likely determine the rest of your salary history at that job.
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  #12  
Old 05-04-2011, 12:55 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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The "Ask the Headhunter" site has discussed this problem a lot. Nick, the guy who runs it, and who is a headhunter, is dead set against revealing this information. A couple of ideas from them:

1. Ask why they would think another company is more competent than they are at assessing your worth to them? (Put in nicer terms, of course.)

2. Salary information is confidential. You need to share it with the government, and with financial institutions covered by privacy laws, but not with direct competitors.

3. Say you will share it, but only when you have a firm job offer.

Definitely don't lie. Very bad move, since if they find out the truth they have reason to fire you or at least never trust you again.

I hope no HR department will give out salary information or even confirm or deny a given salary. The policy I'm aware of involves confirming employment, that's it. HR revealing anything would be a serious breach of confidentiality.
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  #13  
Old 05-04-2011, 01:45 PM
Quartz Quartz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoonbender View Post
I'm employed but in the market for a new job. It's white-collar and there is a lot of variation in salary for this type of position. I've found that a large percentage of employers and recruiters insist on me telling them my current salary. I've been able to stall them so far, but they all say they will "need to know" that information before an offer is made.
"I'm sorry but that is commercially confidential information and I am contractually bound to not reveal it." Feel free to add, "I am looking for a package in the region of X."

This immediately marks you as someone who is discreet and honourable, abiding by their contract.
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  #14  
Old 05-04-2011, 02:07 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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They want the information so they can lowball you. That's why they won't tell you why they want it. Either tell them it's confidential (because it is - there are a lot of companies who will fire you for discussing your salary with co-workers), or lie to them and exaggerate it. They're playing an asshole game; play back or refuse to play at all - your choice.

A company that demands to know your current salary is tipping you off to what they'll be like to work for; they'll expect all the power, and expect you to submit meekly. If you need the job badly enough, you can just play ball with them, but know going in what kind of company you'll be working for.
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  #15  
Old 05-04-2011, 04:54 PM
Yarster Yarster is offline
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I guess I'm an oddity then, because I have always told them what my current salary is and what I want, which has generally been 10-15% more. I don't see a problem with this. If I'm asking too much then so be it. I'd rather kill the deal before it starts then have me waste time with interviews, taking time off work, and then have them offer me $10,000 less than what I make now at the end because everyone was being so coy about salary at the start. What's worse is that the recruiter will probably try to figure out what you are getting paid anyway and make a guess. Or worse, they will ask around with others in the industry and might drop your name, letting everyone you know (including your boss) that you are looking. This has happened to other people I know when very green recruiters were involved.

I'm happy to negotiate salary, but I have no problem laying out my cards on the table and being upfront to cut through all the BS. Frankly, I've felt employers ad recruiters appreciate this and if we are negotiating anything regarding salary, then in generally takes the form of, "well, we can't pay you that much, but how about X in exchange" where X = extra vacation, options, or something else of value. If I'm asking 15% more and they want to negotiate me to 10% with some other perk of real value then that's been reasonable for me. What has never flown with me (and why this trick often comes up is a complete mystery to me) is the scam where they say, "How about we pay you the same base salary with an (impossible to achieve) bonus plan that will get you up to the salary you want?". I've been seeing that a lot in the defense industry lately and I can't figure out who falls for this scam. I've told recruiters as much, especially since companies have a bad habit of magically changing their bonus plans and benefits on a regular basis, always to the detriment of their employees.

Of course, I'm fairly secure in my job at the moment, so while I will always listen to recruiters interested in talking to me, I don't let them jerk me around. Perhaps if I was unemployed, I'd change my tune.
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Old 05-04-2011, 05:04 PM
Bosstone Bosstone is offline
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Originally Posted by Yarster View Post
I guess I'm an oddity then, because I have always told them what my current salary is and what I want, which has generally been 10-15% more.
Well, speaking personally, I'm fairly sure I'm not getting paid as much as I could be for someone in my position and experience. If I were to look for another job, I'd be looking for a new salary 25-50% over what I'm making now. I see no reason a new company should feel justified in shorting me just because I've been shorted at the last job, especially when they would be comfortable paying more.
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  #17  
Old 05-04-2011, 05:10 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
The "Ask the Headhunter" site has discussed this problem a lot. Nick, the guy who runs it, and who is a headhunter, is dead set against revealing this information. A couple of ideas from them:

1. Ask why they would think another company is more competent than they are at assessing your worth to them? (Put in nicer terms, of course.) <snip>
Interesting tactic. However ... what the hell is a nicer way to say that?

(Start with leaving out "the hell," I suppose.)
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  #18  
Old 05-04-2011, 05:30 PM
Cat Fight Cat Fight is offline
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Originally Posted by Quartz View Post
"I'm sorry but that is commercially confidential information and I am contractually bound to not reveal it." Feel free to add, "I am looking for a package in the region of X."

This immediately marks you as someone who is discreet and honourable, abiding by their contract.
This is what I'd recommend. To continue pushing or prying makes them sound like jerks.
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  #19  
Old 05-04-2011, 07:59 PM
Yarster Yarster is offline
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Originally Posted by Bosstone View Post
Well, speaking personally, I'm fairly sure I'm not getting paid as much as I could be for someone in my position and experience. If I were to look for another job, I'd be looking for a new salary 25-50% over what I'm making now. I see no reason a new company should feel justified in shorting me just because I've been shorted at the last job, especially when they would be comfortable paying more.
Fair enough. Perhaps you're at the mid-range in your career where large jumps are possible. I'm a bit more senior, and in my line of work, I'm quickly topping out at the max salary less cost of living increases and bonuses, and to make a jump any higher, it would be to next job category that would be a Vice President type role. I've seen what's involved with that and the sacrifice it means to family, friends, and quality of life along the way. No thanks. I want the Director level job and that's where I'll stay. Ergo the small jumps for me here on out.
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  #20  
Old 05-06-2011, 05:33 AM
EvilTOJ EvilTOJ is offline
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I give a range about the money I make. For example, I'll say I make between 55k to 60k a year.
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  #21  
Old 05-06-2011, 06:04 AM
Rigamarole Rigamarole is offline
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Originally Posted by Spoonbender View Post
So far no one has given a reasonable explanation as to why they need to know this.
Obviously, the "reasonable explanation" is that they need to know how little you're willing to work for so they can low-ball you as much as possible. Unless it's much higher than what they're willing to pay, in which case they need to know you'll be itching to jump ship the moment a better offer comes along so they can save the trouble now by not hiring you.

Lose-lose proposition. Your ball.
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  #22  
Old 05-06-2011, 07:53 AM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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When I switched jobs last time (in a COMPLETELY DIFFERENT ECONOMY), I answered with "more than you can pay me, but that's ok, don't worry about it, make a fair offer and we will work from there." The HR guy I was talking to laughed. But it was true, I was consulting and managing. In moving, I'd stop managing and I'd be moving to something more stable. I'd had kids and wasn't interested in sixty hour weeks or a sixty hour salary.
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  #23  
Old 05-06-2011, 09:21 AM
Dahnlor Dahnlor is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
...or lie to them and exaggerate it. They're playing an asshole game; play back or refuse to play at all - your choice.
I like that. "My salary was ONE MILLION DOLLARS, but I'd be willing to accept less."
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  #24  
Old 05-06-2011, 12:43 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by Dahnlor View Post
I like that. "My salary was ONE MILLION DOLLARS, but I'd be willing to accept less."
This is actually a good idea Anchoring implies that starting with a million bucks, even as a joke, can anchor the HR person higher. Experiments have indicated that giving an absurd data point - like asking if the average temperature in San Francisco is greater than of less 700 degrees F, affects the estimate people have of the actual average temperature.
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  #25  
Old 05-06-2011, 12:45 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Interesting tactic. However ... what the hell is a nicer way to say that?

(Start with leaving out "the hell," I suppose.)
My guess is that Nick would advise you to say "I think I am worth this to you," and have you give reasons why you are. If they bring up the current salary, you can say that you don't understand why your present employer should have any input on how much you are worth to your prospective employer.

But the confidential information tactic is simpler.
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  #26  
Old 05-06-2011, 12:59 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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"This interview is over. I don't play these bullshit games."

Oh, I wish. Maybe some day...
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  #27  
Old 05-06-2011, 01:08 PM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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Be 100% honest, they are testing your integrity and also they are weeding out people.

They can verify salary so you can't hide it. When I was in H/R what we would do was verify old salary and offer 5% more.

The way to get around this is to say, I make $50,000/year + BONUS.

This will give you the leeway to play with. That way if they short you, you can come back with, "Well with the bonus, which I always got..."

The thing is companies budget for positions and the amount for that position has been decided. So there's a 99% chance you have to come in with that or less.

Companies have an excess of qualified applicants, in most, but not all, cases.
So if you're one of those you are going to be weeded out.

For instance, I've been temping for the last 3 years, I have 25 years of hotel experience, (Asst Controller, IT Manger, Revenue Mgr, H/R Manager) and I can't get a job as a desk clerk. Why? Overqualified. They know anything less than a mid management level and I'm gonna keep looking and bolt.

If there were no other candidates of course they'd hire me, but there are lots of people applying with LESS than me.
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  #28  
Old 05-06-2011, 07:00 PM
anu-la1979 anu-la1979 is offline
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I ponied it up because I had shown and listed my federal grade progression on the application form to demonstrate that I had achieved some level of seniority and commanded a decent salary (I ended my career at GS-14). Since that salary info is publicly available, there was no point in hiding it, which I never do in any case.

In the end it worked out for me. I was willing to take a hit on my salary this summer because it's my internship summer and I wanted this company on my resume (perfectly timed opportunity that comes along very rarely). However, once I gave them my salary history the initial sum the recruiter told me on the phone was significantly increased to surpass my ending salary as an attorney. They also added in relocation and paid off my summer housing to boot, so I came out much ahead.

I am not especially keen on negotiating salary for full-time so having them make a decent offer for the summer after I gave them my salary history was quite nice. I know I need to be pushy next year though...yayyyy (*voice trailing off*)

Last edited by anu-la1979; 05-06-2011 at 07:04 PM..
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  #29  
Old 05-06-2011, 07:09 PM
gurujulp gurujulp is offline
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I work for a city government, and the only thing they will tell employment verification folks is that you work(ed) here and your salary.

It is the law here.

Be honest.
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  #30  
Old 05-06-2011, 07:37 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post

The thing is companies budget for positions and the amount for that position has been decided. So there's a 99% chance you have to come in with that or less.

Companies have an excess of qualified applicants, in most, but not all, cases.
So if you're one of those you are going to be weeded out.
For new college grads, PhDs, my company has a fairly wide range of salaries that can be offered without special approval. Previous salary is not relevant for this category, of course. I suspect that for cookie cutter jobs the range is a lot narrower.
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  #31  
Old 05-06-2011, 08:15 PM
Rigamarole Rigamarole is offline
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They can verify salary so you can't hide it. When I was in H/R what we would do was verify old salary and offer 5% more.
How would they verify it if it was with a private company? Are companies just giving that info out these days to any old person who calls up and says they are an HR rep from one of their competitor's companies and they'd like to know detailed salary information about X individual? Who, by the way, is actively looking to leave your company and join ours?
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  #32  
Old 05-06-2011, 08:50 PM
j666 j666 is offline
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"That is covered under my confidentiality agreement."
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  #33  
Old 05-08-2011, 08:13 PM
No umlaut for U No umlaut for U is online now
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"That is covered under my confidentiality agreement."
For the win.
I also believe that companies will interview people hoping that they'll leak that figure (and other information that could be useful).
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  #34  
Old 05-09-2011, 01:53 AM
Snnipe 70E Snnipe 70E is online now
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I work maintanence. The range of pay can be as low as 15$/hour to as high as $50/hour. The employeer that is paying more will only pay it to skilled workers. Those who really fix equipment not just work on it. And they do not pay the high wage to someone who only knows how to use a phone to call a contractor.

What you are now making will be an indicator of what you are worth. I will not go to a job interview unless I know the range that will be paying, I assume that in the same manner they will want to know what I am now being paid. In fact my resume has my present pay rate on it. If I can get personel and the Chief's to read it, it will save both of us time. Why waste time trying to set up an interview date with someone who will not come to work for you.

When I was hiring I wanted to know what they were being paid now. If they were working way under scale it is an indicator that they were semi skilled.
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  #35  
Old 05-09-2011, 07:55 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer View Post
They want the information so they can lowball you. That's why they won't tell you why they want it. Either tell them it's confidential (because it is - there are a lot of companies who will fire you for discussing your salary with co-workers), or lie to them and exaggerate it. They're playing an asshole game; play back or refuse to play at all - your choice.

A company that demands to know your current salary is tipping you off to what they'll be like to work for; they'll expect all the power, and expect you to submit meekly. If you need the job badly enough, you can just play ball with them, but know going in what kind of company you'll be working for.
This.

These kinds of questions are red flags. If you take this job, you will be in an adversarial relationship with your employer who will always be trying to get away with what ever you will allow, and you would be a fool not to respond in kind. If you want that that kind of job, or can't afford to pass it up, at least go into it with your eyes open.
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  #36  
Old 05-09-2011, 08:24 AM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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As soon as you make an offer I'll tell you my current salary if the offer was acceptable.

Last edited by Harmonious Discord; 05-09-2011 at 08:25 AM..
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  #37  
Old 05-09-2011, 08:55 AM
fluiddruid fluiddruid is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
This.

These kinds of questions are red flags. If you take this job, you will be in an adversarial relationship with your employer who will always be trying to get away with what ever you will allow, and you would be a fool not to respond in kind. If you want that that kind of job, or can't afford to pass it up, at least go into it with your eyes open.
I've usually seen these sorts of questions on applications with big companies, rather than in interviews. In this context, it usually is a red flag that you'll be working for a big douchey company that will short you on raises, lay off random critical people for no apparent reason and have policies that'll make you miserable.

The best part is when these companies have current salary on their application as a mandatory field, and require a number, so you can't even put in an explanation. A few times, I've put in "0" to decline, and it kicked back a rejection from that too (must be an actual value)!

I wouldn't decline a job on this basis alone but, as you say, it's a red flag.
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  #38  
Old 05-09-2011, 10:53 AM
Sinaptics Sinaptics is offline
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I work in the Legal field primarily with huge law firms. So they're all douchy. I can't remember the last time I didn't get asked this question.

I normally estimate up my total compensation (base salary + bonus + OT + anything else that might be relevant) and give them that figure.

I'd love to go the confidential route, but I'm not sure that would fly in my industry. Because there are only so many big law firms, it's common for employees to move in between them. I can state confidentiality, but when they've previously interviewed 2 dozen people from my law firm and no one mentions confidentiality, then I look a little dishonest.

I'm in the same position as Bosstone. I'm underpaid at my current firm and am looking to move. Potentially I'm looking at anywhere from a 30%-100% increase over my current base salary depending on the exact position to which I move. I worry about getting low-balled due my current base. I might just try the confidentiality thing anyway.
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  #39  
Old 05-09-2011, 02:19 PM
raspberry hunter raspberry hunter is offline
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Last time I went for a job interview they required me to bring in a pay stub!

Although I meekly submitted to that one, I suppose it's unsurprising that our negotiations ultimately faltered over quality-of-life concessions I demanded (and that my current job is providing me with) and that they were unwilling to give me.
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  #40  
Old 05-09-2011, 03:47 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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BTW, if you think this is bad, I've seen a report of a company demanding the Social Security number of an applicant in order to do a credit check before an interview.
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  #41  
Old 05-09-2011, 07:24 PM
Spoonbender Spoonbender is offline
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Thanks everyone for your comments. I'm glad to hear the consensus seems to be that this is a deplorable practice.
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
The "Ask the Headhunter" site has discussed this problem a lot.
Thanks, Voyager, I found one of Nick's articles on the subject and found it very helpful.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quartz
"I'm sorry but that is commercially confidential information and I am contractually bound to not reveal it."
Unfortunately, this isn't true - I checked my company's confidentiality agreement - and I don't think I could lie credibly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Whisperer
A company that demands to know your current salary is tipping you off to what they'll be like to work for
A lot of people have echoed this sentiment and I'm inclined to agree. I'm not desperate yet so I can afford to be picky. Once I'm desperate, I'll consider bending over.

Since I first posted this thread I've dealt with one company that batted away all my evasion tactics and absolutely would not proceed if I didn't provide the information. I declined, and that's that.

Clearly, you WILL lose job opportunities if you don't play ball. The harder question is whether these "opportunities" are worth it.

Last edited by Spoonbender; 05-09-2011 at 07:24 PM.. Reason: changed "are" to "is"
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  #42  
Old 05-09-2011, 10:18 PM
mac_bolan00 mac_bolan00 is offline
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that should be the last question, when they're ready to make an offer. guaging an applicant's caliber by how much he's making at the moment is rubbish (those earning less than $80,000 need not apply.)
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  #43  
Old 05-10-2011, 01:26 AM
Happy Fun Ball Happy Fun Ball is online now
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Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Spiraling the Drain
Posts: 2,319
I have said this:

"Why don't we first determine if this is a good match, and then let's discuss salary."

Followed by this:

"My previous company paid me $xx,xxx per year, but they did offset this low amount with these benefits (6 weeks vacation, stock options with accelerated vesting, flex time). Without these benefits, I would be willing to entertain $xxx,xxx."

My final strategy was:

"Well, I think the position has lots of promise and I am excited to have the opportunity to work on your project, but unfortunately, the amount you are offering is below what I feel would be fair compensation. I understand that your budget is limited, so let's see if there are creative ways we can bridge the gap. How about an extra week of vacation every year."







Of course, he just said, "Look kid, it's like I said, we pay $8.15 and hour starting, what the fuck is your problem anyway?"

I keed... Really, variations on the script above have worked for me.
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  #44  
Old 05-10-2011, 09:59 AM
Freddy the Pig Freddy the Pig is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoonbender View Post
Unfortunately, I'm working a lot with recruiters, and the recruiter's excuse is always that the employer "needs" to know, and the reasons why are not the recruiter's problem.
I understand your reasons for not wanting a potential employer to know your salary, but I'm lost as to why you wouldn't want a recruiter to know.

The business of a recruiter is knowing how much people are making and how much companies are paying. They can provide a reality check as to whether your feeling of being underpaid is legitimate.

I don't see the problem with telling a recruiter, "I'm making 60k, but I think that people doing similar work for other companies are making 80k, and I'm not interested in any position paying less than 75k. Since I'm looking for a substantial increase, please don't reveal my salary to potential employers."

An ethical recruiter will follow your instructions. Drop the unethical ones like a hot potato.
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  #45  
Old 05-10-2011, 04:35 PM
zoid zoid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
BTW, if you think this is bad, I've seen a report of a company demanding the Social Security number of an applicant in order to do a credit check before an interview.
Depending upon the job I don't see this being a bad thing.
I worked for AMEX for years and our office also happened to do remit and fulfillment for the Midwest. As a result there were often large sums of cash laying around. If you have serious financial issues that's a legitimate concern.
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  #46  
Old 05-12-2011, 11:36 AM
Dr. Righteous Dr. Righteous is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2002
I've come across many an online application that requires you to fill in this information. I hate having to answer it, but I know it can be verified so there's no point in answering in any way but the truth.

Same goes for title... it turns out my old title is too junior for what I was actually doing, but since that can also be verified I cannot change it to something more reflective of my responsibilities. I can address this in an interview, IF I get past the bots who scan my resume...
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  #47  
Old 05-12-2011, 04:51 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Righteous View Post
I've come across many an online application that requires you to fill in this information. I hate having to answer it, but I know it can be verified so there's no point in answering in any way but the truth.
Unless you are certain the bots will bounce your resume, in which case, it make no difference if you lie or not, does it?
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  #48  
Old 05-12-2011, 11:57 PM
Spoonbender Spoonbender is offline
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Originally Posted by Freddy the Pig View Post
I understand your reasons for not wanting a potential employer to know your salary, but I'm lost as to why you wouldn't want a recruiter to know.
The recruiter is paid by the employer. They are NOT on your side. Also, most have said that the reason they want to know my salary is that the employer demands this information.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freddy the Pig View Post
An ethical recruiter will follow your instructions. Drop the unethical ones like a hot potato.
Hard to tell them apart. If a recruiter revealed my salary to a potential employer, how would I know?
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  #49  
Old 05-13-2011, 02:10 PM
Dr. Righteous Dr. Righteous is offline
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
Unless you are certain the bots will bounce your resume, in which case, it make no difference if you lie or not, does it?
More and more I am coming across companies that don't just want your resume but make you fill out an online form, which requires a number in that field or you cannot submit the application (I assume this is so all my info gets into their internal database properly). I have to put SOMETHING there, or not apply... often there is no other option. Sucks mightily.

I'm actually thinking that in the future I'm going to put the full value of my prior employment, including the value of all my benefits. My former employer kindly provided me with that number in the offer letter, so it's a number I can back up with proof.
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