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  #1  
Old 05-15-2011, 08:52 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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What is a good Rock n Roll (auto)biography?

I am debating between grabbing the new Steven Tyler book and the recent Keith Richards offering. Any opinions on either of these? Any others I should consider?*


mmm


*(don't necessarily have to be recent)
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  #2  
Old 05-15-2011, 09:05 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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The best one ever is Dylan's Chronicles. Hands down.

As for others, it depends on why you want to read them. Are you looking for flash, and sex, and road tales? Are you looking for what it's like to before fame sets in? Are you looking for how a band works and evolves? Are you looking for how the music business works? There are books in all these categories and more, and just because you like one doesn't mean you'll like the others. Can you give us an idea of what you want?
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  #3  
Old 05-15-2011, 09:17 AM
Stratocaster Stratocaster is offline
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Keith's book was very entertaining. And he was surprisingly literate. I know he had help writing it, but he definitely dispelled for me the caricature I had of him--the cackling, addled, brain-dead reprobate. Not to say the volume of drugs he imbibed over his lifetime wasn't astounding, and there was no lack of drug and wild party stories. But he could turn a phrase, he's pretty well-read, clearly intelligent--not the cartoon character he was in my head. A very interesting life...

Just bought the Tyler book , but haven't read it yet.

Last edited by Stratocaster; 05-15-2011 at 09:17 AM..
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:27 AM
singular1 singular1 is offline
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I tried to read Red by Sammy Hagar and gave up about halfway through. It's like listening to Trump. My coworkers liked it, though, but they have a higher opinion of Hagar than I do in the first place. YMMV, as always.
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:34 AM
Bijou Drains Bijou Drains is offline
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The Clapton book was good Also Dear Boy which is about Keith Moon is good.

Last edited by Bijou Drains; 05-15-2011 at 09:35 AM..
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  #6  
Old 05-15-2011, 10:56 AM
Shakester Shakester is offline
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I've read a kazillion of them, they're one of my special subjects. A lot of them are trashy, but there are some gems.

My favourite? Andy Summers' One Train Later.

I'm not a huge fan of the Police, though I always liked them. I admire Andy Summers as a guitarist. But, as it turns out, the guy can write. His story is interesting enough on its own, but what makes his book great is that he manages to write about being a musician, and eventually a very successful one, in a way that is both humble and full of insight. His book is one of the best autobiographies I've ever read, and not just in the "musician" category.

The Keith Richards one is entertaining, worth reading just to get Keith's personal take on the story. Bob Dylan's Chronicles is very good, and I hope he writes more autobiography.

The Sammy Hagar one is trash; Sammy has far too high an opinion of himself and far too low an opinion of anyone who ever disagreed with him.
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  #7  
Old 05-15-2011, 11:01 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
The best one ever is Dylan's Chronicles. Hands down.
Ya know, I am huge into Dylan and I completely forgot about this one, thanks for the reminder.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stratocaster View Post
Keith's book was very entertaining. And he was surprisingly literate. I know he had help writing it, but he definitely dispelled for me the caricature I had of him--the cackling, addled, brain-dead reprobate. Not to say the volume of drugs he imbibed over his lifetime wasn't astounding, and there was no lack of drug and wild party stories. But he could turn a phrase, he's pretty well-read, clearly intelligent--not the cartoon character he was in my head. A very interesting life...Just bought the Tyler book , but haven't read it yet.
You've sold me. I am going to Kindle-ize both of these for my upcoming time on the beach in the Dominican Republic.

Thanks!


mmm
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Old 05-15-2011, 11:05 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Originally Posted by Shakester View Post
I've read a kazillion of them, they're one of my special subjects. A lot of them are trashy, but there are some gems.

My favourite? Andy Summers' One Train Later.

I'm not a huge fan of the Police, though I always liked them. I admire Andy Summers as a guitarist. But, as it turns out, the guy can write. His story is interesting enough on its own, but what makes his book great is that he manages to write about being a musician, and eventually a very successful one, in a way that is both humble and full of insight. His book is one of the best autobiographies I've ever read, and not just in the "musician" category.

The Keith Richards one is entertaining, worth reading just to get Keith's personal take on the story. Bob Dylan's Chronicles is very good, and I hope he writes more autobiography.

The Sammy Hagar one is trash; Sammy has far too high an opinion of himself and far too low an opinion of anyone who ever disagreed with him.
I'm not a bit Police fan either. And I doubt that I could read an entire book that has anything to do with Van Halen.


mmm
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  #9  
Old 05-15-2011, 11:18 AM
Markxxx Markxxx is offline
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If you never read about Connie Francis, read a bio on her. She had so much happen to her, you can't help but have an interesting read. From her failed relationships, to massive stage fright, to being raped at a hotel. It's a shame people forgot her for the most part. She was to pop music from 1955 - 1964 what Madonna was to pop music in the 80s and 90s.
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Old 05-15-2011, 11:18 AM
silenus silenus is online now
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Mick Fleetwood's autobiography is pretty good, as is Grace Slick's.
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  #11  
Old 05-15-2011, 11:23 AM
Diogenes the Cynic Diogenes the Cynic is offline
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Has anyone read Neil Peart's book that he wrote about the prolonged motorcycle journey he took after losing both his daughter and his wife in the space of a year? Is it any good? I guess it's not really a convetional rock memoir, but I'm curious about it.

Last edited by Diogenes the Cynic; 05-15-2011 at 11:24 AM..
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  #12  
Old 05-15-2011, 11:53 AM
gaffa gaffa is offline
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Originally Posted by Shakester View Post
I've read a kazillion of them, they're one of my special subjects. A lot of them are trashy, but there are some gems.

My favourite? Andy Summers' One Train Later.

I'm not a huge fan of the Police, though I always liked them. I admire Andy Summers as a guitarist. But, as it turns out, the guy can write. His story is interesting enough on its own, but what makes his book great is that he manages to write about being a musician, and eventually a very successful one, in a way that is both humble and full of insight. His book is one of the best autobiographies I've ever read, and not just in the "musician" category.
When I saw the thread title, that was the book I immediately thought of. Great writing by a guy who credits luck and circumstance more than his own talent (which is considerable IMO), thus the title.

Patty Boyd's book is also excellent. It is about her relationships with Clapton and Harrison, but has some excellent and graceful writing.
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  #13  
Old 05-15-2011, 12:06 PM
aldiboronti aldiboronti is offline
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The best rock biography I've ever read is Last Train to Memphis: The Rise of Elvis Presley by Peter Guralnick. (There's a sequel, Careless Love, covering his later life, equally good.)
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  #14  
Old 05-15-2011, 12:33 PM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is offline
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Previous thread: rock biographies
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  #15  
Old 05-15-2011, 12:40 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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I always liked the Jim Morrison biography No One Here Gets Out Alive, by Jerry Hopkins, who lives in Thailand now and whom I may have met in Madrid Bar in the Patpong red-light district. Details are fuzzy.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 05-15-2011 at 12:42 PM..
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  #16  
Old 05-15-2011, 12:55 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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"Redemption Song-The Ballad Of Joe Strummer" is a very well written book by Chris Salewicz, an English music journalist and a longtime friend of Strummer's.

It gives a lot of details of The Clash's early years in London, and offers an unvarnished look at Joe Strummer's personal life and the various musical influences working in the seminal British Punk scene back in the 1970-1980's.
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Old 05-15-2011, 01:01 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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I read Frank Zappa's autobiography years ago--so long I don't remember the title. I think it might be The Real Frank Zappa , but don't know if he has more than one autobiography.

Make what you will of his music, but the man was a genius--and is a fantastic writer with an interesting worldview to share.
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  #18  
Old 05-15-2011, 01:29 PM
Jumpbass Jumpbass is offline
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Agreed, The Real Frank Zappa Book is a fun read.

I also enjoyed Nick Mason's Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd.

Ronnie Woods' autobiography was enjoyable. He's very entertaining and upbeat, even about his low times.

My favorite is The Heroin Diaries by Nikki Sixx. Yes, yes, I know... Motley Crue. The book is very intense. It's his diaries and notes from his last year of severe heroin and cocaine addiction. It also has comments from the people in his life. No punches are pulled. It's brutally honest.
There's also an album he released as a soundtrack to the book. The band is Sixx:AM, and not very much like Crue. It's one of the CDs I don't take out of my car.
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Old 05-15-2011, 01:36 PM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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I'm reading "X-Ray" (the unauthorized autobiography) of Ray Davies right now. I'm a big Kinks fan so I'm enjoying it thoroughly, although the style may not be to everyone's taste. One nugget I found fascinating as someone who grew up on on classic rock: at one show in 1964, 3 of the acts were The Kinks, The Highlanders (aka The Who), and The Beatles. What a show that must have been!

ETA: I also just bought "Kink" the autobiography of Dave Davies. I can't wait to read that next to see the other side of the story...

Last edited by Southern Yankee; 05-15-2011 at 01:37 PM..
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  #20  
Old 05-15-2011, 02:04 PM
canterburyales canterburyales is offline
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Things the Grandchildren Should Know is a quick read by Mark "E" Everett of the Eels. Not a big name rocker, but an interesting read.
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  #21  
Old 05-15-2011, 02:31 PM
Jaledin Jaledin is offline
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Dr. John's autobiography (Under a Hoodoo Moon is excellent. I know he plays a bunch of different music, but I think of him as a rock and roll guy. If Keith can sing "The Nearness of You," then Dr. John gets a rock and roll pass as well, I say.
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  #22  
Old 05-15-2011, 02:36 PM
Kilvert's Pagan Kilvert's Pagan is offline
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I too liked Zappa's. Kieth Emerson's made me cringe - he was brutally honest, and as a result I lost a lot of respect for him. The one I've liked the most in many year is Bill Bruford's.. The man lived his career backwards, starting out in supergroup Yes and then intentionally going more and more "niche" in pursuit of playing the music that most appealed to him. I very much admire the guy now.
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Old 05-15-2011, 03:24 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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Dr. John's autobiography (Under a Hoodoo Moon is excellent. I know he plays a bunch of different music, but I think of him as a rock and roll guy. If Keith can sing "The Nearness of You," then Dr. John gets a rock and roll pass as well, I say.
I just saw Dr. John perform a few days ago down in New Orleans, and while he sounded great, he really looked frail and not in great health.

The rumor is that he is facing some very serious health issues, and whatever the actual situation is, I hope he is going to be able to make a recovery.
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  #24  
Old 05-15-2011, 03:53 PM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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Originally Posted by Thudlow Boink View Post
Previous thread: rock biographies
Thanks Thudlow - great minds, Shakester
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  #25  
Old 05-15-2011, 05:46 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Originally Posted by Kilvert's Pagan View Post
I too liked Zappa's. Kieth Emerson's made me cringe - he was brutally honest, and as a result I lost a lot of respect for him. The one I've liked the most in many year is Bill Bruford's.. The man lived his career backwards, starting out in supergroup Yes and then intentionally going more and more "niche" in pursuit of playing the music that most appealed to him. I very much admire the guy now.
Please elaborate a bit on the Keith Emerson stuff.

And what sort of music is Bruford playing these days?


mmm
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  #26  
Old 05-16-2011, 12:52 AM
BaneSidhe BaneSidhe is offline
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Has anyone read Neil Peart's book that he wrote about the prolonged motorcycle journey he took after losing both his daughter and his wife in the space of a year? Is it any good? I guess it's not really a convetional rock memoir, but I'm curious about it.
"Ghost Rider" is a pretty good book. It's part travelogue, part personal evaluation and so much more. I'd give it a whirl.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:16 AM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Originally Posted by MPB in Salt Lake View Post
I just saw Dr. John perform a few days ago down in New Orleans, and while he sounded great, he really looked frail and not in great health.

The rumor is that he is facing some very serious health issues, and whatever the actual situation is, I hope he is going to be able to make a recovery.
You just saw Dr. John in New Orleans?

Well, I guess you could say you saw him in the right place...











*puts on sunglasses*


















*clears throat*










but it must have been the wrong time.
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  #28  
Old 05-16-2011, 04:14 AM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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Bad Moon Rising: The Unauthorized History of Creedence Clearwater Revival by Hank Bordowitz.

Great book about the band and it's nasty breakup.

For the Record 7: Up around the Bend: The Oral History Of Creedence Clearwater Revival Craig Werner

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  #29  
Old 05-16-2011, 04:43 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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I have already loaded the Keith Richards and Dylan bios into my Kindle, but this:

Quote:
Bad Moon Rising: The Unauthorized History of Creedence Clearwater Revival by Hank Bordowitz.
...sounds like another contender.


mmm

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  #30  
Old 05-16-2011, 06:52 AM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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I have already loaded the Keith Richards and Dylan bios into my Kindle, but this:
Here was a prior thread where I reviewed Keith's book.
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Old 05-16-2011, 07:07 AM
Crotalus Crotalus is offline
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I agree that the Richards and Summers books are very good. Shakey, by Jimmy McDonough, is a good biography of Neil Young.
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  #32  
Old 05-16-2011, 07:20 AM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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When Giants Walked The Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin is a really good book. Much better than that Hammer Of The Gods one.
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  #33  
Old 05-16-2011, 08:04 AM
groovie groovie is offline
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Chuck Berry and BB King both have very good autobiography(s), highly recommended if your taste in music extends anywhere towards them.
Neil Peart has some good books too.
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  #34  
Old 05-16-2011, 08:13 AM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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Chuck Berry and BB King both have very good autobiography(s), highly recommended if your taste in music extends anywhere towards them.
Neil Peart has some good books too.
Chuck's is, um, well, a bit short on detail. It's a Disney version - sacrificing detail and insight to make sure that the overall themes of Chuck's legend get burnished. There is an important, historical biography required of Berry, given his seminal importance as a musician, guitarist, rock innovator, crossover success at the dawn of the teenager as a target population, AND given all of the...complications...he has had in his life - but his autobiography is not that book.
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  #35  
Old 05-16-2011, 08:50 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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The Beatles: A Biography by Bob Spitz. Well written, and extensively researched. You will discover plenty of things you never knew, a notable feat since the group has been so well documented.
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:04 AM
Ms Boods Ms Boods is offline
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I'm reading "X-Ray" (the unauthorized autobiography) of Ray Davies right now. I'm a big Kinks fan so I'm enjoying it thoroughly, although the style may not be to everyone's taste. One nugget I found fascinating as someone who grew up on on classic rock: at one show in 1964, 3 of the acts were The Kinks, The Highlanders (aka The Who), and The Beatles. What a show that must have been!

ETA: I also just bought "Kink" the autobiography of Dave Davies. I can't wait to read that next to see the other side of the story...
If you'd like the trifecta, look for Pete Quaife's Veritas, Vol 1. It's not an autobiography, but a fictional account of a guy growing up in north London during the '50s and joining a band in the early '60s, based on Quaife's experiences in joining up with the Kinks.
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:05 AM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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If you'd like the trifecta, look for Pete Quaife's Veritas, Vol 1. It's not an autobiography, but a fictional account of a guy growing up in north London during the '50s and joining a band in the early '60s, based on Quaife's experiences in joining up with the Kinks.
Thanks, I'll look for it!
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:08 AM
groovie groovie is offline
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Chuck's is, um, well, a bit short on detail. It's a Disney version - sacrificing detail and insight to make sure that the overall themes of Chuck's legend get burnished. There is an important, historical biography required of Berry, given his seminal importance as a musician, guitarist, rock innovator, crossover success at the dawn of the teenager as a target population, AND given all of the...complications...he has had in his life - but his autobiography is not that book.
I was thinking more how he wrote - he has quite the turn of phrase, but you're right it was Chuck writing for Chuck first and foremost.
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:32 AM
cjepson cjepson is offline
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Mick Fleetwood's autobiography is pretty good, as is Grace Slick's.
I have to say I didn't care for the Grace Slick one that much. Too much of it was just her spouting off about various topics.

I really liked Levon Helms' This Wheel's On Fire, but I must say it makes it hard to enjoy watching The Last Waltz... Levon really tears Robbie Robertson a new one. He essentially says that Robbie Robertson is the reason Richard Manuel is dead.

If you like the Grateful Dead, Searching for the Sound by Phil Lesh is really good.

Please Kill Me is a riveting first-person account of punk.
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:42 AM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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I really liked Levon Helms' This Wheel's On Fire, but I must say it makes it hard to enjoy watching The Last Waltz... Levon really tears Robbie Robertson a new one. He essentially says that Robbie Robertson is the reason Richard Manuel is dead.
Well, we need to remember that Levon Helm is a National Treasure and is universally beloved by his fellow musicians, while Robbie Robertson is a vain, shallow, egotistical pariah who is now shunned by the vast majority of those he once worked with.

It isn't just Levon Helm who has no use for Robbie Robertson....

(That said, I watch The Last Waltz every few months and still think it is the finest live concert film of all time)
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:43 AM
WordMan WordMan is offline
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The Beatles: A Biography by Bob Spitz. Well written, and extensively researched. You will discover plenty of things you never knew, a notable feat since the group has been so well documented.
I really enjoyed this book, too; and per cjepson, Please Kill Me is essential reading, alongside Azerrad's Our Band Could Be Your Life...
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  #42  
Old 05-16-2011, 12:05 PM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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Well, we need to remember that Levon Helm is a National Treasure and is universally beloved by his fellow musicians, while Robbie Robertson is a vain, shallow, egotistical pariah who is now shunned by the vast majority of those he once worked with.

It isn't just Levon Helm who has no use for Robbie Robertson....

(That said, I watch The Last Waltz every few months and still think it is the finest live concert film of all time)
Would you mind expanding on this a bit? I never followed The Band very closely and don't know much about them.
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Old 05-16-2011, 12:58 PM
Baal Houtham Baal Houtham is offline
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I really liked Levon Helms' This Wheel's On Fire, but I must say it makes it hard to enjoy watching The Last Waltz... Levon really tears Robbie Robertson a new one. He essentially says that Robbie Robertson is the reason Richard Manuel is dead.
The books paints Robertson as the bad guy, but it was more innuendo than facts. (IMO of course.)

Helm's complaints seemed to be
1. That RR grabbed the writing credits (hence the real money and income stream) when a lot of the songs were collaborative efforts.

2. That RR and the manager (Albert Grossman) decided to push RR as the Star, and limit the writing of the other members.

3. That the other members were bullied into signing away their partial writing credits for a lump sum.

I think all three of those arguments can be challenged (if not totally refuted.) The Band were veteran musicians, I find it hard to accept that RR and Grossman could push them around against their will (especially on the last point... signing away their writing royalties.)

I'd say that although the other members wrote a few good songs, that RR was the genius and the driving force. (At least for the 3 or 4 prime years of their careers.) If the other members didn't want it to become the RR show, they didn't have to let it be that way.

And while every member of a group as brilliant as the Band obviously contributes to the construction of the songs, that doesn't necessary make them co-composers. Which seemed to be what Helms was asserting much of the time.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:11 PM
Baal Houtham Baal Houtham is offline
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The books paints Robertson as the bad guy, but it was more innuendo than facts. (IMO of course.) (Albert Grossman) decided to push RR as the Star, and limit the writing of the other members.
I wanted to add:
It's been four years since I read the book, but I sorta recall that Helms seemed very schizoid on the topic of Albert Grossman.

Most of the time AG is described as a great guy whom Helms really likes, but when it comes time to bash Robertson, then Grossman is conspiring with RR to screw the rest of the group.

That was another reason I ultimately had trouble accepting Helms' account. It seemed like he'd grab any sort of evidence to use against Robertson, even if it went against what he was saying elsewhere in the book.

(Although like I said, it's been awhile, and my memory might be bad.)
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  #45  
Old 05-16-2011, 01:14 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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It's always interesting how two (or more) people can read the exact same book and draw completely opposite conclusions about it's content.

That said, Robbie Robertson was a great songwriter, and wrote some of The Band's finest material, but as for his character as a person.....
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:34 PM
Baal Houtham Baal Houtham is offline
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It's always interesting how two (or more) people can read the exact same book and draw completely opposite conclusions about it's content.
The funny thing is that as I read it I was swept up in Helms' narrative and was hating on Robertson, almost the entire way.

I remember thinking that he seemed to want it both ways on Grossman, but it didn't bother me much. Then after describing several years of hating Robertson for dominating the writing credits, Helms mentions that ultimately the other members agree to sign away all their writing credits. What?

That broke the camel's back, and I started thinking that Helms' was not a reliable witness. And that's when I concluded that Helms' case was more innuendo that cold hard facts.

But, for 9/10s of the book I took the same message as cjepson.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:08 PM
Elmer J. Fudd Elmer J. Fudd is offline
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I'm a Rock bio junky and I've read and enjoyed many of the books already mentioned in this thread but I really have to say the most enjoyable has been that of Kathy Valentine of the Go-Go's who has been tweeting here memoirs 140 characters at a time for more than a year now. She hasn't even gotten to the 21st Century yet! Follow her autobiography @kvmemoir
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Old 05-16-2011, 06:50 PM
Kilvert's Pagan Kilvert's Pagan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Please elaborate a bit on the Keith Emerson stuff.

And what sort of music is Bruford playing these days?


mmm
Bruford retired from drumming last year, but he was doing nothing but acoustic jazz toward the end of his playing career. Emerson's reads like a confessional - to the point that he dedicates the book to his ex-wife, "the mother of my children". She certainly had every reason to hate him, given his (perhaps typical) diddling of groupies, etc...

The book is called Pictures of an Exhibitionist. I'm not saying you shouldn't read it - just don't expect to like KE more when you're done. The biggest revelation for me was
SPOILER:
that the first time he did the "drag the old Hammond out and beat the hell out of it" was during an acid trip while he was with the Nice.
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  #49  
Old 05-16-2011, 07:06 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baal Houtham View Post
The funny thing is that as I read it I was swept up in Helms' narrative and was hating on Robertson, almost the entire way.

I remember thinking that he seemed to want it both ways on Grossman, but it didn't bother me much. Then after describing several years of hating Robertson for dominating the writing credits, Helms mentions that ultimately the other members agree to sign away all their writing credits. What?

That broke the camel's back, and I started thinking that Helms' was not a reliable witness. And that's when I concluded that Helms' case was more innuendo that cold hard facts.

But, for 9/10s of the book I took the same message as cjepson.
In full disclosure, I should add that I briefly met Levon (he had a music club in the French Quarter) several years back, and even though I only talked to him for a moment or two, he was such a genuine, down-to-Earth guy that I can't help but think highly of him, and obviously his drumming/musical talent is world-class....

There are others, notably the late, great Bill Graham who felt that Robbie Robertson is a pompous prick, so it's not just Levon Helm and the other former members of The Band that are disgusted with Robertson.
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  #50  
Old 05-16-2011, 08:41 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Y'all are trying to get me to spend more money.

Random notes:

I've read 'Shakey', the Neil Young work, and loved it.

I am also a huge Band fan, and The Last Waltz is one of my favorite movies, period. Favorite Band member? Levon.

I didn't know Helm had written a book, and I had no idea of the bad blood between him and Robertson (who I didn't know, of course, was thought to be a jerk-off). If anything, Rick Danko seemed a bit dick-ish to me.

So, according to Helm, what is the connection between Roberson and Manuel's death?

Crap, now I gotta buy this one, too.


mmm

ETA: Damn, This Wheel's on Fire is not available for Kindle.

Last edited by Mean Mr. Mustard; 05-16-2011 at 08:42 PM..
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