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  #1  
Old 07-01-2011, 02:12 PM
Red Barchetta Red Barchetta is offline
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Are you still allowed to bring Codeine across the Canadian/American border?

I remember that you used to be able to bring 2-bottles of codeine from Canada across the border to the states? Is this still the case?
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  #2  
Old 07-01-2011, 03:42 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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In this day and age, bringing anything suspicious is a no-no, even if you can cite statutory or case law supporting a right to possession. You DON'T want to arouse the suspicions of customs.

Do you have a prescription for it that is valid in the US?
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  #3  
Old 07-01-2011, 04:04 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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I thought that you can bring a 90 day supply of a drug that you can legally purchase OTC in the country you are coming from with you upon returning home, even if you don't have a prescription for it in the USA....
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  #4  
Old 07-01-2011, 04:28 PM
Red Barchetta Red Barchetta is offline
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Yeah I don't have a prescription, but I know you didn't need them before. Just wondering if anything changed...particularly since I'm leaving back to the states in a couple hours
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  #5  
Old 07-02-2011, 03:40 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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Customs agents have a lot of discretion. An awful lot. One told someone in the seat in front of me on train from Vancouver, BC to Seattle that no amount of any prescription drug was allowed under any circumstances. So when he asked me if I had any drugs, I just lied. Of course he was wrong, but what do I gain by arguing with him?
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  #6  
Old 07-02-2011, 06:16 PM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
Customs agents have a lot of discretion. An awful lot. One told someone in the seat in front of me on train from Vancouver, BC to Seattle that no amount of any prescription drug was allowed under any circumstances. So when he asked me if I had any drugs, I just lied. Of course he was wrong, but what do I gain by arguing with him?
I find that difficult to believe, if I do not have my meds I will die. If customs refuses me entry or takes away my prescription meds they will see me in court.
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  #7  
Old 07-02-2011, 09:37 PM
Duckster Duckster is offline
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Quote:
Medication
Rule of thumb: When you go abroad, take the medicines you will need, no more, no less. Narcotics and certain other drugs with a high potential for abuse - Rohypnol, GHB and Fen-Phen, to name a few - may not be brought into the United States, and there are severe penalties for trying to do so. If you need medicines that contain potentially addictive drugs or narcotics (e.g., some cough medicines, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, antidepressants or stimulants), do the following:
  • Declare all drugs, medicinals, and similar products to the appropriate CBP official;
  • Carry such substances in their original containers;
  • Carry only the quantity of such substances that a person with that condition (e.g., chronic pain) would normally carry for his/her personal use; and
  • Carry a prescription or written statement from your physician that the substances are being used under a doctor's supervision and that they are necessary for your physical well being while traveling.
U.S. residents entering the United States at international land borders who are carrying a validly obtained controlled substance (other than narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or LSD), are subject to certain additional requirements. If a U.S. resident wants to bring in a controlled substance (other than narcotics such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, or LSD) but does not have a prescription for the substance issued by a U.S.-licensed practitioner (e.g., physician, dentist, etc.) who is registered with, and authorized by, the Drug Enforcement Administration to prescribe the medication, the individual may not import more than 50 dosage units of the medication into the United States. If the U.S. resident has a prescription for the controlled substance issued by a DEA registrant, more than 50 dosage units may be imported by that person, provided all other legal requirements are met.

Please note that only medications that can be legally prescribed in the United States may be imported for personal use. Be aware that possession of certain substances may also violate state laws. As a general rule, the FDA does not allow the importation of prescription drugs that were purchased outside the United States. Please see their Web site for information about the enforcement policy for personal use quantities.

Warning: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits the importation, by mail or in person, of fraudulent prescription and nonprescription drugs and medical devices. These include unorthodox “cures” for such medical conditions as cancer, AIDS, arthritis or multiple sclerosis. Although such drugs or devices may be legal elsewhere, if the FDA has not approved them for use in the United States, they may not legally enter the country and will be confiscated, even if they were obtained under a foreign physician’s prescription.

Additional information about traveling with and importing medication can be found at the FDA's Drugs page. ( Drugs)
(Bolding mine.) http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/va...xml#Medication
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  #8  
Old 07-02-2011, 10:36 PM
needscoffee needscoffee is offline
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Codeine formulations are sold without prescription in Canada (or were 20 years ago the last time I got it).

Last edited by needscoffee; 07-02-2011 at 10:37 PM..
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  #9  
Old 07-02-2011, 10:43 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
I find that difficult to believe, if I do not have my meds I will die. If customs refuses me entry or takes away my prescription meds they will see me in court.
You mean they will see your corpse in court.


mmm
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  #10  
Old 07-02-2011, 11:03 PM
R. P. McMurphy R. P. McMurphy is offline
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Anecdotal assessment:

The Customs Service is far more advanced than the Transportation Safety Authority (TSA). Back in the day, say the '60's, almost every bag brought into the USA was subject to at least a brief visual inspection. The amount of international travel expanded so much that it was determined that the procedures were extremely unproductive. The Customs Service concentrated their effort on cooperating with law enforcement and relying on tips. It was a much more efficient and effective way to operate. Currently, you can breeze through customs if you have not been targeted and don't raise suspicions. The Customs Service doesn't have the time and inclination to worry about catching people with a bottle of 222's in their baggage. Other things might raise their suspicions and the 222's found for other reasons may create a problem but it's not because that is what they were looking for. There is an element of common sense.

OTOH, the TSA is staffed with a bunch of amateurs. I doubt that they hire anyone with any common sense. Many of the TSA agents are apparently people that have never had any authority and love exercise what little they have been given. It seems that they are trained and forbidden from having common sense. What is going on in airports these days defies common sense. The only hope is that the system will evolve, common sense will win out and air travel can become a lot less painless.

And I don't want to hear a bunch of shit about how they have to be "random". Forcing a person on a tight connection (who the system shows to have a long and frequent travel history) to miss their plane and spend the night in the airport because their carry-on bag was 1 1/2 inches too long for the test bracket, even though it fit, and the flight was 1/2 full, is just total BS.
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  #11  
Old 07-02-2011, 11:45 PM
Moonlitherial Moonlitherial is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by needscoffee View Post
Codeine formulations are sold without prescription in Canada (or were 20 years ago the last time I got it).
They still are, but it's a relatively low dosage that's available OTC. The bottle of Tylenol sitting beside me has 8mg of Codeine phosphate, 300mg of Acetaminophen and 15mg of Caffeine per tablet.

I generally just carry one open bottle and I've never had an issue at customs.
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  #12  
Old 07-02-2011, 11:52 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
You mean they will see your corpse in court.


mmm
He would have to file the appropriate habeas motion.
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  #13  
Old 07-03-2011, 12:32 AM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus Spectre of Pithecanthropus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonlitherial View Post
They still are, but it's a relatively low dosage that's available OTC. The bottle of Tylenol sitting beside me has 8mg of Codeine phosphate, 300mg of Acetaminophen and 15mg of Caffeine per tablet.

I generally just carry one open bottle and I've never had an issue at customs.
Unless the law's been changed, Schedule V drugs, which includes the weaker narcotic preparations, do not require a prescription under Federal law1; all the Controlled Substance Act requires is much the same kind of stocking and record-keeping procedures that apply to pseudoephedrine. The drugs have to kept behind the counter, each sale is to be recorded in a logbook signed by the purchaser, and the customer is allowed to purchase only a limited amount in a given time. The curious upshot of all this is that it's possible for a substance to be "controlled" in the eyes of Federal law enforcement and at the same time be sold OTC.

1Many if not most states, however, have stricter laws and do require a prescription, and some individual pharmacists may impose their own limitations with regard to people they do not know. Similarly, pharmacy chains may have their own restrictions as well.

Last edited by Spectre of Pithecanthropus; 07-03-2011 at 12:34 AM..
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  #14  
Old 07-03-2011, 09:44 AM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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Yes, they would see my corpse in court. I assume that, had I insisted on seeing his supervisor, it would all have been OK. But I didn't want the hassle. The guy was an idiot. But my point was how arbitrary they can be.

Not that it is relevant, none of the drugs was a painkiller or anything like that. I guess I did have some tylenol in my cosmetic kit, but I had forgotten about that until now.
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