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  #1  
Old 07-09-2011, 05:43 AM
Win Place Show Win Place Show is offline
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Do you take your "crap" clothes to Goodwill, or just the stuff that's still in good shape?

Planning on cleaning out the closets this weekend, and I'm debating what to do with probably 50 - 60 old articles of clothing that I haven't touched in probably two years.

The only problem is that most of this stuff would be considered crap to most people. Old white T-shirts that have become discolored; the jeans I wore that time I painted the garage (which are effectively ruined); button-down shirts that have frayed at the collar and at the sleeves, etc.

Would Goodwill / the Salvation Army have any use at all for this stuff? I don't know if I should box it all up and take it to the local office, or if it would be seen as "patronizing" to just dump my crap on them. I'm thinking that maybe by the "there's starving kids in Africa" philosophy (which got me to eat my green beans as a kid), maybe somebody somewhere could get some use out of it?

Or should I just say 'forget it', and throw it all in the dumpster?
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  #2  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:02 AM
Sierra Indigo Sierra Indigo is offline
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They will throw it out.

They will launder clothes and may fix a small seam split or something like that, but frayed or discoloured clothes, missing a ton of buttons, torn all over the place, whatever... It's too much time and effort for them to repair before selling.
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  #3  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:17 AM
Morgyn Morgyn is offline
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Crap cloths are turned into cleaning/work rags.

Good clothes go to Goodwill.

Ask yourself this: would you buy it? If the answer is no, then it's probably not something you should donate.
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  #4  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:23 AM
Girl From Mars Girl From Mars is offline
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I only donate clothes which are good enough to wear again - charities refer to them as 'gently used'. For stuff that's completely worn out, there are bins around the station where I live where charities collect clothes to be made into rags - I think they make a small amount of money selling the clothes in bulk.

One of the city councils here (Brisbane) has this to say about donating clothes for rag use:

Quote:
Worn / Damaged / Unsaleable Clothing

There are number of companies that perform recycling of worn / damaged / un-saleable clothing that is usually sourced from charities. Please contact your local charity to find out if they participate or search for a commercial clothing recycler on BusinessRecycling.com.au.

Items that are suitable for industrial rags should be:

Clean - no dirt, oil, grease, paint, blood
Absorbent materials only - no denim
Suitably sized - the minimum cut size for rags is 400mm square. Children's clothing is usually too small.

Preferable items include T Shirts, towels, flannelette, sheets - especially white materials.If your items do not meet the above criteria, please do not put them in charity clothing banks/boxes. Unsuitable items will be sent to landfill and the charity will incur a disposal cost.

Some clothing (preferably natural fibres) can be used for weed matting. A community garden, Landcare or Bushcare group near you may have a use for worn clothing. Contact your local council to find out if any of these groups operate in your area.
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  #5  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:26 AM
Win Place Show Win Place Show is offline
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Great, thank you guys for the quick responses - this saved me, and probably a handful of people at the local charity, a whole lot of wasted time.
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  #6  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:27 AM
KinkiNipponTourist KinkiNipponTourist is offline
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Heh. In Japan, the charities demand that clothes be cleaned/DRY-CLEANED if necessary, before donating. I had so much trouble even finding a place that would accept used clothing that I now ship to a Goodwill-type shop halfway across the country. Shipping adds another $20 or so.
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  #7  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:32 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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All of it. I worked in a charity shop a couple of years ago when I was unemployed- once a week, a van would collect sacks of textiles and rags to go off for recycling and re-use. They paid us per bag, and the contents just had to be any fabric.
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  #8  
Old 07-09-2011, 07:46 AM
kiz kiz is offline
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The charities around here recycle the unwearable clothing. They'll keep anything that is wearable, no matter its age.
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  #9  
Old 07-09-2011, 08:56 AM
Student Driver Student Driver is offline
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Used to work at a Goodwill, and can corroborate the last few posters. Unusable clothing is sold to recyclers/resalers, so "crap" clothing still makes the charity some money. Probably best to call ahead, but definitely don't jump to a conclusion that a charity will "throw it out."

If you do have "good" clothing to donate as well, it helps to put it in a separate bag; a ton of stuff is donated every day, and sorters have to work quickly, so good clothes can accidentally get tossed into a recycle bin if it's lost in a jumble of bad clothes. If you have matched set/multiple-part garments, like suits or something, having them together on a hanger or in their own separate sack helps to keep the set together through processing. If you're donating new/unused clothing, it can help to mark this on the bag (or simply leave the tags on).

Dirty and/or wet clothing is the one type of clothing we couldn't use or recycle. You wouldn't believe how many people would try to donate wet clothing. People would bring sacks of stuff from flooded basements, or leave bags in their pickup trucks while it rained, then get pissed off when we would turn it down.
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  #10  
Old 07-09-2011, 09:14 AM
AntiCoyote AntiCoyote is offline
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You can use Rit dye to dye the discolored white t-shirts. I've done that to extend them.
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  #11  
Old 07-09-2011, 09:18 AM
Ca3799 Ca3799 is offline
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I volunteer as a clothes sorter at a charitable resale shop on occasion. I'm a secretary at their food bank, but fill in at the resale shop when they are short.

Please, do not send your dirty clothes. I can't tell you how many times I have been totally grossed out out opening a bag full of nasty, dirty clothes. My least favorite was a whole bag of worn out, menstrual blood stained, bathing suits. Ick.

We sort and hang good clothes that are clean and in good condition for resale. We do not wash or repair anything.

Unsaleable clothes are dirty (no rings around the collar!), frayed, stained, missing buttons, etc. If it can't be worn out of the bag, it is tossed to the recycle bin.

Unsaleable clothes we give to a recycler. I do not know if the recycler pays for them, if we pay the recycler to haul them away, or if the clothes are just given to the recycler. I suppose if the reycler is getting paid, they may not mind the unusable clothes.
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  #12  
Old 07-09-2011, 09:22 AM
bump bump is offline
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Is it strictly the state of the clothing, or does style have anything to do with wearability? Most of what I donate is stuff that's usually about 10 years or so old, so it looks goofy, but is still in fine shape.
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  #13  
Old 07-09-2011, 09:46 AM
Chanteuse Chanteuse is offline
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I admit I do donate some of my kids' junky clothes. Why? Because there might be some people out there who, like me, want old play clothes for their kids. I got tired of buying good clothes for them to go outside in and stain irreparably. I started going to Goodwill and buying "prestained" clothes on the cheap and then I didn't have to worry about what they did to them.

Of course, I don't donate unwearable clothes, but even stained garments might be considered usable under the right conditions!
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  #14  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:01 AM
blindboyard blindboyard is online now
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Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
All of it. I worked in a charity shop a couple of years ago when I was unemployed- once a week, a van would collect sacks of textiles and rags to go off for recycling and re-use. They paid us per bag, and the contents just had to be any fabric.
This. Might make an exception for anything covered in menstrual blood, but otherwise take it all in. Where I work they get 55p per kilogram for rags, which normally amounts to between one and two hundred pounds per week added to the takings.
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  #15  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:04 AM
Digital is the new Analog Digital is the new Analog is offline
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One of my favorite local thrift shops doesn't have a recycling program for the 'crap' clothes. They end up throwing stuff out. And if they get too much of it, they get CHARGED for throwing it out.
I'd say it's always best to ask in advance.

For what it's worth..I donate to this shop because it's small..located in an area giving it clients from homeless to poor to moderate. I've seen them give huge discounts to some of their regulars. I've even taken a homeless friend in when he had a job for a few months up north, and they GAVE him a few pairs of jeans and some sweatshirts to help him out.

Picking a thrift shop to donate clothes to can be like picking any charity to donate money to - they're all a little different, and shopping around can be a learning experience.

-D/a
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  #16  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:07 AM
Bridget Burke Bridget Burke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bump View Post
Is it strictly the state of the clothing, or does style have anything to do with wearability? Most of what I donate is stuff that's usually about 10 years or so old, so it looks goofy, but is still in fine shape.
Styles run in cycles. Kids of today might find your goofy stuff to be quite amusing, in an ironic sort of way...

Bell bottoms have come & gone several times. Sources say that shoulderpads for women are the next zombie style. (Those who do not remember the fashion mistakes of the past are doomed to repeat them.)
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  #17  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:21 AM
johnpost johnpost is online now
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you might find a clothing bank, often run by a religious group, that will take usable clothes that resale stores would not resell but only recycle.
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  #18  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:28 AM
Quasimodem Quasimodem is offline
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My used-to-be-white t-shirts are the only crap thing I take there. The rest is nice stuff.

Q
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  #19  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:48 AM
Jeep's Phoenix Jeep's Phoenix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridget Burke View Post
Styles run in cycles. Kids of today might find your goofy stuff to be quite amusing, in an ironic sort of way...

Bell bottoms have come & gone several times. Sources say that shoulderpads for women are the next zombie style. (Those who do not remember the fashion mistakes of the past are doomed to repeat them.)
Apparently most places will accept out-of-fashion clothes, or they're willing to keep the stuff awhile...a lot of people I know consider thrift stores good places for costume shopping.

I don't take stuff to a thrift store unless it's something I would wear again (if it fit!). I did some clothes-sorting for a local charity after Hurricane Floyd, and it was very clear that many people in that area consider charities to be dumping grounds for worn-out clothing. The worst item we got was a very, very large bra that had once been white...it was a blotchy yellow, and the fabric was stiff from sweat and filth.
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  #20  
Old 07-09-2011, 11:29 AM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is online now
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Until I read an article a couple of years ago I used to assume like Sierra Indigo does that they throw out anything they can't sell, but now I know better. 90% of clothing donations get sold to recyclers and Goodwill (specifically GW, small thrift shops are a different matter) makes a nice chunk of change that way, so it's far better to give them your "crap" clothing than simply tossing it out because you can't imagine anyone wearing it.
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  #21  
Old 07-09-2011, 04:50 PM
Toucanna Toucanna is offline
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I can only speak for where I live.

First, two very generalized statements: The Salvation Army's mission is to directly assist those in need. Items donated to the S.A. may be given to those who need them or sold to provide the S.A. with operating funds. Goodwill Industries' mission is to provide job skills training and job placement assistance to those who are typically considered marginally employable/unemployable (e.g., people with developmental challenges). Items donated to G.I. are sold to fund its training programs and provide operating funds.

Once again, this is a simplified generalization which I've included mostly because I think Goodwill would much prefer to receive cash donations [rant] rather than the tons of broken, stained, mismatched, missing-important-pieces-of junk often left piled on their doorstep in the middle of the night when the attendant isn't there to tell the "donor" they need to take their cr@p to the landfill and pay the dump fee rather than saddle Goodwill with it.[/rant]

I never donate clothing that is stained, is missing buttons, is ripped, has opened seams, frayed cuffs, etc. to a thrift shop. Clothing with minimal damage I will wash and dry, then take to places where homeless people gather to receive food, medical attention, and other assistance from local charities. I leave the clothing there for anyone who needs it. I donate used bras at these locations, but only if they are still wearable (no rips, loose seams, stretched-out elastic, etc). I never donate used underpants or socks with holes. I occasionally buy deeply discounted/clearance-priced new underwear from stores and include that in the clothing for the homeless.

Another option is to donate "gently used" clothing to shelters for battered women. They often escape their abusers with only the clothes they (and their children) are wearing.

Hope you find this info useful. Regards,
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  #22  
Old 07-09-2011, 04:58 PM
elmwood elmwood is offline
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Throw the crap in Planet Aid boxes. Give the still-decent items to Goodwill, the Salvation Army, or St. Vinnie's.
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  #23  
Old 07-09-2011, 05:11 PM
Shirley Ujest Shirley Ujest is offline
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I work for a SA and the shit that is donated is pretty vile. Vile shit does not ever make it to the floor. It gets tossed.

The guys that work the dock have to handle and sort out your boxes and bags of crammed crap. Shoes go into a huge box. Purses and accessories go into another huge box. Xmas gets its own box. books fill up their own huge box about twice a day at our store ( other stores, not so much.) etc. It is scarily organized back there. When the boxes are full, they are either sent by truck to be sorted out at a main warehouse so the SA can make sure it isn't giving away the one book in the bin that is worth $100 and the rest are not worth .25 combined. Then it is sent to a store. If we actually get "our" books back, I'll eat my hat. We are probably getting some shithole area's books in ( alot of God Will Save You Finciancially type books along with Taking BAck command of your Family & Wife tripe. and some other store is getting all the really good books. ( We're in a high rent zipcode. we be literate here.)

Oh, don't donate your f'n text books, trip books from England 1987, or anything like that. M'kay. Nobody wants them. Also, guess what the number one subject is that is donated in books: The bible. Seriously. I could buy up all the f'n bibles and build a wall out of them, probably a whole house, but that would be creepy and I'd have the American Taliban come after me.


Clothing: If it stinks of cigerettes or other funk, it gets pitched. Stuff that is found to have holes, pills, rips stains and tears, goes into a different bin and is bundled elsewhere, supposedly to a third world country.


What is most desperately needed are mens jeans and shoes. You guys wear your fn jeans and shoes until they dissolve. STOP DOING THAT YOU BASTIDS. Donate your stuff, now.

Women, clean out everyone's closets and purge it all. You don't need the 8 bridesmaids dresses from 1988. Dump them. They are awesome for parties and 80's themed events. Clean out your crap.

Donate your jewelry. Put all your earrings in a little ziplock so they stay together. Same thing for necklaces. There is one poor schmuck who makes shit pay who has to sort through 10000's of pairs of mismatched earrings every other day ( they don't give the jewelry girl full time.) and it is a clusterfark of a hot mess. Those junk rings you have, those are great for little girls to buy for themselves for $1. Donate them.
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  #24  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:11 PM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toucanna View Post
Another option is to donate "gently used" clothing to shelters for battered women. They often escape their abusers with only the clothes they (and their children) are wearing.

Hope you find this info useful. Regards,
Same apparently goes for used bed linens, particularly twin-sized, around here - the shelters can never seem to get enough of them.
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  #25  
Old 07-09-2011, 06:18 PM
SciFiSam SciFiSam is offline
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Most of the stuff I donate is fine - a lot of it's stuff my daughter's grown out of.

I never donate jeans because of the enormous racks of jeans I see at every charity ship round here. There is a clothing bin near my house, so those jeans go there.

The clothes are always clean, but I don't make any extra effort to iron them, partly because they're going to get crumpled from me carrying them there anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digital is the new Analog View Post
I'd say it's always best to ask in advance.
I second this; my nearest charity shop sometimes wants plastic carrier bags to give to customers and sometimes they're overwhelmed with them.

I also once called ahead to a local charity bookshop and, without me asking, they came and collected the books.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirley Ujest View Post
Oh, don't donate your f'n text books, trip books from England 1987, or anything like that. M'kay. Nobody wants them. Also, guess what the number one subject is that is donated in books: The bible. Seriously. I could buy up all the f'n bibles and build a wall out of them, probably a whole house, but that would be creepy and I'd have the American Taliban come after me.
Agreed. Most of the other stuff about dirty clothes should be obvious, but people do tend to think that books are valuable no matter what they're about. Who would ever want a Lonely Planet: Rome guide from 1998? Too many things have changed in the intervening 13 years.

Some textbooks, of course, are well worth donating, if they're within the last few years, but, for example, my ex's CIMA accounting textbooks are valueless a year after she bought them because the syllabus changed and it's very much about learning the specific syllabus rather than learning any specific skills.

I also don't donate books that have lots of scribble on them from when my daughter was younger. No book that's damaged in any way is going to get sold unless it's a first edition or something like that.

If I'm donating something extra nice I put it at the top of the pile and mention it to the staff. This is easy because if something's extra nice then I'm likely to leave it till last anyway.

At least paper is still recyclable. It feels weird to send books off to be pulped, but if you don't want read them any more and know that no-one else will either, you're just pulping bits of paper with typing on, not treasures of literature.
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  #26  
Old 07-09-2011, 07:30 PM
No umlaut for U No umlaut for U is offline
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Originally Posted by SciFiSam View Post
Most of the stuff I donate is fine - a lot of it's stuff my daughter's grown out of.

I never donate jeans because of the enormous racks of jeans I see at every charity ship round here. There is a clothing bin near my house, so those jeans go there.

The clothes are always clean, but I don't make any extra effort to iron them, partly because they're going to get crumpled from me carrying them there anyway.



I second this; my nearest charity shop sometimes wants plastic carrier bags to give to customers and sometimes they're overwhelmed with them.

I also once called ahead to a local charity bookshop and, without me asking, they came and collected the books.



Agreed. Most of the other stuff about dirty clothes should be obvious, but people do tend to think that books are valuable no matter what they're about. Who would ever want a Lonely Planet: Rome guide from 1998? Too many things have changed in the intervening 13 years.

Some textbooks, of course, are well worth donating, if they're within the last few years, but, for example, my ex's CIMA accounting textbooks are valueless a year after she bought them because the syllabus changed and it's very much about learning the specific syllabus rather than learning any specific skills.

I also don't donate books that have lots of scribble on them from when my daughter was younger. No book that's damaged in any way is going to get sold unless it's a first edition or something like that.

If I'm donating something extra nice I put it at the top of the pile and mention it to the staff. This is easy because if something's extra nice then I'm likely to leave it till last anyway.

At least paper is still recyclable. It feels weird to send books off to be pulped, but if you don't want read them any more and know that no-one else will either, you're just pulping bits of paper with typing on, not treasures of literature.
Amen to the last! Another thing with books, if they're very foxed, mildewed, or from a smoking household, please just toss them. Whoever has to sort them could have an allergic reaction.
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  #27  
Old 07-09-2011, 10:10 PM
CanvasShoes CanvasShoes is offline
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No, I throw away or use crap clothes for rags. I only take clothes that are in good enough to wear condition to the thrift store (not saying they're going to still be in fashion, but they're not worn out or in disrepair ).
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  #28  
Old 07-10-2011, 02:03 AM
Toucanna Toucanna is offline
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@Shirley Ujest: + <<Standing Ovation smilie>>
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  #29  
Old 11-12-2013, 06:34 AM
Munch Munch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra Indigo View Post
They will throw it out.

They will launder clothes and may fix a small seam split or something like that, but frayed or discoloured clothes, missing a ton of buttons, torn all over the place, whatever... It's too much time and effort for them to repair before selling.
Not the Goodwills here in Indy, one of the largest Goodwill organizations in the country. 100% of all clothing items are used - if it doesn't sell, it gets recycled as textiles.

And Goodwill stopped laundering and fixing ripped seams or broken buttons decades ago.
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  #30  
Old 11-12-2013, 07:00 AM
Rushgeekgirl Rushgeekgirl is offline
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I don't take anything to Goodwill. There is a church charity I have worked for that takes anything, and gives it directly to those in need the most. A homeless person doesn't care if jeans have holes or stains. The woman who runs the clothes closet will do repairs and laundering if necessary. The rare time we threw things out is if they smelled really bad even after laundering.
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  #31  
Old 11-12-2013, 07:06 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Reported - spammer 3 posts above this revived a zombie.
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  #32  
Old 11-12-2013, 07:10 AM
highrollinwooded highrollinwooded is offline
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If something is stained, zipper broke, bleach stains,etc....not something you would wear..it is JUNK! Throw it out, make rags out of it...whatever. The local thrift stores around here are mostly run by elderly and mentally handicapped people, who have a hard time discerning these things in clothing. The stores are charged for getting rid of peoples garbage. More than once I have been pissed off when I buy something, get it home and it is damaged. Or I see things on the hangers that are beyond selling. I want to grab a cart and gather up all the bad stuff and bring it up to them to throw out. I fully believe that the vast majority of people that donate this crap are aware of the damage. Shitty shape....throw it out!!!

Last edited by highrollinwooded; 11-12-2013 at 07:11 AM..
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  #33  
Old 11-12-2013, 07:27 AM
Marion_Wormer Marion_Wormer is offline
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Here is an article on how used clothing is now US 8th largest export.

And how the dark side of the business works

Last edited by Marion_Wormer; 11-12-2013 at 07:28 AM..
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  #34  
Old 11-12-2013, 07:31 AM
highrollinwooded highrollinwooded is offline
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That's good and fine, but in our small neck of the woods, there is no money/manpower to ship these damaged goods to third world countries....thus costing precious money for disposal....probably applies in big cities though..
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  #35  
Old 11-12-2013, 07:34 AM
campp campp is offline
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Old cotton t shirts make the very best household rags, IMHO.
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  #36  
Old 11-12-2013, 08:04 AM
overlyverbose overlyverbose is offline
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I agree. It's a tid bit douchey to give someone stained or torn clothes. I throw them out or use them as rags; good stuff only goes to Goodwill. Oh, and no underwear. The thought of giving someone else something that has been on my crotch seems really gross, whether they're clean or not. I can see buying a few packs of undies and giving them unopened to Goodwill, but all worn underwear goes straight to the trash when it's no longer useable or wanted.

Bras are kind of a grey area. A decent one can be super expensive - sometimes as much as $50. But it's also been on my boobs. I haven't yet decided to start giving them to Goodwill, but it seems far less disgusting than a pair of my old skivvies.
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  #37  
Old 11-12-2013, 10:50 AM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlyverbose View Post
... Bras are kind of a grey area. A decent one can be super expensive - sometimes as much as $50. But it's also been on my boobs. I haven't yet decided to start giving them to Goodwill, but it seems far less disgusting than a pair of my old skivvies.
I felt the same way. But: 1 : ) boobs don't give off any bodily fluids (unless you're in a particular time of life, or very sweaty) and 2 : ) I put some out for $1 per at my yard sale and sold all of them.

Run 'em through the washing machine, on delicate cycle, and you'll be OK.

Last edited by purplehorseshoe; 11-12-2013 at 10:51 AM..
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  #38  
Old 11-12-2013, 11:17 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Originally Posted by overlyverbose View Post
Bras are kind of a grey area.
Maybe use some bleach?
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  #39  
Old 11-12-2013, 12:22 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is online now
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I recycle the over worn torn & damaged clothes, and donate the rest.

They can & do turn worn out clothing into those grey blankets the Red cross etc hand out. For this wool is particularly good. So that ratty old motheaten wool coat could be turned into a blanket that saves someone’s life.

Musty and dusty is OK, but filthy and smelly is not. Sure, they will boil the material or dry clean or otherwise clean, but think of the workers who have to sort them.

Planet Aid is a scam.
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  #40  
Old 11-12-2013, 12:29 PM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlyverbose View Post
Bras are kind of a grey area. A decent one can be super expensive - sometimes as much as $50. But it's also been on my boobs. I haven't yet decided to start giving them to Goodwill, but it seems far less disgusting than a pair of my old skivvies.
After I lost a lot of weight, I had a number of quality bras in very good shape that were too big. I went ahead and donated them because I figured my boobs are no more gross than a man's chest, and men donate plenty of stuff that they've worn right next to their skin like polo shirts and t-shirts.

All three of our main thrift store chains, (Goodwill, Thrift Town and Eco-Thrift) all sell second hand bras.
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  #41  
Old 11-12-2013, 12:51 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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Regarding this discussion about how some of the charities will take the crap clothes so they can sell them to a fabric recycler.

How can I cut out the middleman and sell my crap clothes directly to the fabric recycler?
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  #42  
Old 11-12-2013, 01:36 PM
Munch Munch is offline
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Originally Posted by Dogzilla View Post
How can I cut out the middleman and sell my crap clothes directly to the fabric recycler?
Our Goodwill outlets sell clothing by the pound to the public. Clothing they don't sell then gets sent overseas for pennies on those dollars. Exactly how many pounds of clothing do you have?
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Old 11-12-2013, 01:44 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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I wouldn't even know how to weigh it. But I have several large boxes packed full of stuff, some of which is sellable/wearable and a lot of which isn't. It's enough that it would require several trips to Goodwill I think. I'm all for donating the sellable stuff to Goodwill, but why should they make all the pennies on the wholesale to-be-recycled stuff?
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:04 PM
Munch Munch is offline
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I'm all for donating the sellable stuff to Goodwill, but why should they make all the pennies on the wholesale to-be-recycled stuff?
To make donating to them even easier? The OP's problem is negated when people know that Goodwill isn't burdened by having to pay to take stuff to the dump, since they use 100% of all donated clothing - even the filthy nasty stuff.

The pennies they make per pound of the textile recyclables are a result of having a large, efficient infrastructure that can squeeze those pennies out. Got a giant baler? How about a fleet of delivery trucks? Got a long-standing relationship with the company in China that does the recycling? How about a shipping company to get it there?
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:46 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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To make donating to them even easier? The OP's problem is negated when people know that Goodwill isn't burdened by having to pay to take stuff to the dump, since they use 100% of all donated clothing - even the filthy nasty stuff.

The pennies they make per pound of the textile recyclables are a result of having a large, efficient infrastructure that can squeeze those pennies out. Got a giant baler? How about a fleet of delivery trucks? Got a long-standing relationship with the company in China that does the recycling? How about a shipping company to get it there?
Sheesh, I'm sorry I offended you with my brilliant idea to get filthy rich recycling some old jeans. Absent any substantial detail, I envisioned it like this: textile recycler makes rounds to various Goodwill shops around town. "Got anything today, Maxine?" "Yeah, Bubba, we've got 500 pounds of denim jeans in back, you know where they are." And then Bubba loads the 500 pounds of jeans on his truck, pays the few cents, and his company makes dollars turning those textile scraps into whatever. So my question was, how do I get Bubba Textile Recycler to stop by my house, or is there a drop off spot somewhere in my city?

But no, apparently, it's a moral affront to Goodwill. So I've gotta haul my 150 pounds of jeans (or whatever it is -- it's more than just old mom jeans from the 90s) over there and make them sort it all out. Nothing in this thread indicated I would need a giant baler, a fleet of delivery trucks, or a shipping company to China. My apologies for not knowing better.
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  #46  
Old 11-12-2013, 03:04 PM
Munch Munch is offline
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I'm not quite sure why you read any annoyance in my post.

Anyway, if you're really looking to make a couple pennies off that shitty pair of gabardines, why not just donate them to Goodwill and take the tax deduction? It'd surely be more than you'd get from Bubba.
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