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  #1  
Old 07-10-2011, 01:20 PM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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Raw eggs in beer (safety)

How safe is the traditional alcoholic's breakfast?
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  #2  
Old 07-10-2011, 01:34 PM
Simplicio Simplicio is offline
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Thats a tradition? Blech
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  #3  
Old 07-10-2011, 01:45 PM
Toucanna Toucanna is offline
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I have heard it's drunk as a "hangover cure". (Not that I believe in that and yes, pun intended, thank you )
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Old 07-10-2011, 02:23 PM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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As safe as eating any raw egg, or eating unbaked cake mix or cookie dough - a bit of a gamble, but probably OK. The alcohol in the beer won't kill pathogens, if they're present in the egg.
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  #5  
Old 07-10-2011, 08:44 PM
Yorikke Yorikke is offline
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I have never heard of that, and I think I'm going to vomit at the thought...

Joe
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Old 07-10-2011, 08:45 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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Ruins a perfectly good egg and a perfectly good beer.

ETA: assuming it's a good beer to begin with.

Last edited by running coach; 07-10-2011 at 08:45 PM..
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  #7  
Old 07-10-2011, 09:00 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Originally Posted by wheresgeorge04 View Post
I have never heard of that, and I think I'm going to vomit at the thought...

Joe
I agree. Never heard of it and will never try it.
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  #8  
Old 07-10-2011, 10:09 PM
AnalogSignal AnalogSignal is offline
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Not safe because of the risk of Salmonella bacteria.
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  #9  
Old 07-10-2011, 11:52 PM
appleciders appleciders is offline
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I think it's called a "prairie oyster". I know it as an Old West thing.

Edit: Nope, I was wrong. Nevermind.

Last edited by appleciders; 07-10-2011 at 11:53 PM..
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  #10  
Old 07-10-2011, 11:56 PM
Ambivalid Ambivalid is offline
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Originally Posted by Bricker View Post
How safe is the traditional alcoholic's breakfast?
I'd say about as safe as the traditional alcoholic.
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  #11  
Old 07-11-2011, 12:16 AM
Hunter Hawk Hunter Hawk is offline
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If you're paranoid, you can get pasteurized in-the-shell eggs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteur...zed_shell_eggs
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  #12  
Old 07-11-2011, 07:51 AM
ratatoskK ratatoskK is offline
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Why would anyone drink this? Is it supposed to make you throw up?
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  #13  
Old 07-11-2011, 08:25 AM
yabob yabob is offline
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In fact, there used to be a saying you don't hear much anymore: "Whaddya want, egg in your beer?". Used when you've already gotten something, but aren't satisfied with it. Implying that egg in your beer is in some way desirable.

I've only seen it done when I was just barely old enough to be hanging out in bars, and it was some old geezer that would be doing it. Presumably the old geezer started doing it when HE was just barely old enough to be hanging out in bars, putting the practice a good ways back, maybe into the 1930s.
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  #14  
Old 07-11-2011, 08:53 AM
lazybratsche lazybratsche is offline
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The alcohol in beer (or even wine) at around 5% is too weak to effectively disinfect anything. Remember that all that alcohol was produced by yeast happily fermenting sugars. They stop producing more once the alcohol has reached a mildly toxic concentration sufficient to prevent new growth (but not kill!). The yeast in an unfiltered bottle of beer is still alive. Yeast isn't even a particularly hardy microbe compared to many pathogenic bacteria like salmonella.

In fact I think I remember some bit of science reporting saying that moderately boozy eggnog (maybe 20% alcohol?) will slow the growth of salmonella and eventually kill it after several weeks.

The ~3% alcohol you end up with in your beer+egg concoction might barely slow the bacterial growth. If you're starting with a contaminated egg, the beer won't help at all. But the vast majority of eggs aren't contaminated at all, which is why there isn't an massive epidemic of Death By Cookie Dough. Maybe 99.9% of the time you'd be just fine, 0.09% of the time you might end up with a mild case of food poisoning, and 0.01% of the time you might have a serious case of food poisoning. Frankly you're probably taking a bigger risk every time you get in your car.
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  #15  
Old 07-11-2011, 09:24 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Originally Posted by Toucanna View Post
I have heard it's drunk as a "hangover cure". (Not that I believe in that and yes, pun intended, thank you )
I've never heard of an "alcoholic's breakfast." I have heard of the "hair of the dog that bit you," which means you wake up and drink exactly what you were drinking when you passed out.

And so far as I know, the traditional hangover cure is raw eggs, tomato juice, and Tabasco sauce.

Last edited by Acsenray; 07-11-2011 at 09:24 AM..
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  #16  
Old 07-11-2011, 09:26 AM
Mr. Excellent Mr. Excellent is offline
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Frankly you're probably taking a bigger risk every time you get in your car.
Especially if you get in your car right after drinking that beer, egg or no egg.
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  #17  
Old 07-11-2011, 09:35 AM
Mr. Moto Mr. Moto is offline
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Why don't you go with a pickled egg with your beer? Just as traditional, and no risk of food poisoning at all.

Risk of vomiting may be raised for some people, but that is an unrelated item.
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  #18  
Old 07-11-2011, 09:40 AM
Rachellelogram Rachellelogram is offline
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It would seem the point of the cure is to get some protein back in your system (always good during a hangover), plus "hair of the dog" (not that it's ever made me feel better personally, but I hear it works for some people).

Seems like a more effective solution would be to cook the eggs and eat them, with the beer on the side (although preferably, orange juice would be better).
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:35 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by AnalogSignal View Post
Not safe because of the risk of Salmonella bacteria.
Not perfectly safe, but the odds a US egg is infected with Salmonella is something on the level of 1 in 20,000. I enjoy raw eggs from time to time, but there is a minuscule risk involved.
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  #20  
Old 07-11-2011, 10:40 AM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Sounds about as appealing as Clamato juice in beer.
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Old 07-11-2011, 10:49 AM
lazybratsche lazybratsche is offline
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Originally Posted by rachelellogram View Post
It would seem the point of the cure is to get some protein back in your system (always good during a hangover), plus "hair of the dog" (not that it's ever made me feel better personally, but I hear it works for some people).

Seems like a more effective solution would be to cook the eggs and eat them, with the beer on the side (although preferably, orange juice would be better).
Seriously. IMO fried eggs (along with a nice pile of hash browns and some bacon) are the best hangover breakfast. I've never had beer with breakfast, but I have had late-night-fried-eggs with beer and it's a pretty tasty combination. Why the hell would you ruin beer with a raw egg? Or vice-versa, ruin a perfectly fryable egg with beer?
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  #22  
Old 07-11-2011, 10:58 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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IANAA (for some definitions of alcoholic), but I put a raw egg in a smoothie breakfast drink maybe 3 times a week. Definitely over 100 raw eggs a year for the past 5 years. Never had a problem. My gf does the same. They're form our own hens, other than over the winter when they stop laying.
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  #23  
Old 07-11-2011, 11:08 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Sounds about as appealing as Clamato juice in beer.
Hey! That actually is good.
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  #24  
Old 07-11-2011, 12:13 PM
LouisB LouisB is offline
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Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Sounds about as appealing as Clamato juice in beer.
I've never done Clamato in beer but a "Red Draw" (tomato juice and draft beer) used to be very popular back home in Texas. It's actually pretty good.
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  #25  
Old 07-11-2011, 12:27 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Hey! That actually is good.
Dad?
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  #26  
Old 07-11-2011, 12:48 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Dad?
It's basically just a Bloody Mary (or Bloody Caesar, really) made with beer instead of vodka. There's also a michelada version that omits the Clamato or tomato juice, and is mostly just worcestershire, lime, and hot sauce. That's good, too. Something about a really hot day and the salty thirst quenchingness of the drink just works.
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  #27  
Old 07-11-2011, 01:16 PM
Anamorphic Anamorphic is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
It's basically just a Bloody Mary (or Bloody Caesar, really) made with beer instead of vodka.
To me, that's kind of like saying, "Oh, it's basically just a chocolate cake, with broccoli instead of chocolate."*
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  #28  
Old 07-11-2011, 01:38 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Anamorphic View Post
To me, that's kind of like saying, "Oh, it's basically just a chocolate cake, with broccoli instead of chocolate."*
Well, no, not really in any meaningful sense. A bloody Mary, to me, is basically a drink based on tomato juice, worcestershire sauce, a citrust, hot sauce, and alcohol, in the standard case, vodka. Swapping out alcohols is not that big a switch. You know how people make "margaritas" with beer sometimes instead of tequila? Same idea, except with a bloody mary. It's in no way similar to making chocolate cake with brocooli instead of chocolate. More like making chocolate cake with, say, rice flour instead of cake flour.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-11-2011 at 01:38 PM..
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  #29  
Old 07-11-2011, 01:55 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Well, no, not really in any meaningful sense. A bloody Mary, to me, is basically a drink based on tomato juice, worcestershire sauce, a citrust, hot sauce, and alcohol, in the standard case, vodka. Swapping out alcohols is not that big a switch.
(You forgot the celery seed/salt/stick/leaves/whatever something from celery.)

Well, why do you get to redefine one of the ingredients -- vodka -- as "alcohol"?

What if I redefined the recipe as "a juice, a fermented condiment, an acid, a chili-based condiment, and alcohol." Then I could make a bloody mary with pineapple juice, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, Patak's vindaloo sauce, and apple cider.

Anyway, isn't it important that vodka is essentially flavourless? So, your ingredients should be "tomato juice, worcestershire sauce, a citrus, hot sauce, and a flavourless alcohol, in the standard case, vodka."

Last edited by Acsenray; 07-11-2011 at 01:56 PM..
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  #30  
Old 07-11-2011, 02:00 PM
Snickers Snickers is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
You know how people make "margaritas" with beer sometimes instead of tequila?
Holy cats, people actually do this?! Swap beer for tequila in some sort of faux-margarita concoction? I've heard of the beer + Clamato thing, but this...this sound vile.
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  #31  
Old 07-11-2011, 02:03 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
Well, why do you get to redefine one of the ingredients -- vodka -- as "alcohol"?
Because bloody mary (and many other cocktail) variations are generally based on replacing the alcohol, that's way.

See Wikipedia list of Bloody Mary variations. Note the "Bloody beer." Also, note the "Bloody Maureen" for fun (replaces vodka with Guinness.)

Seriously, is it that much of a stretch to think of a michelada as a bloody mary with beer instead of vodka? Really?
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:07 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Snickers View Post
Holy cats, people actually do this?! Swap beer for tequila in some sort of faux-margarita concoction? I've heard of the beer + Clamato thing, but this...this sound vile.
Not me, but it's not exactly unheard of. Google "beer margarita." (Although most recipes have beer in addition to the tequila.) Both Rachel Ray and Sandra Lee have recipes in the first few Google hits, so no doubt it's mainstream.
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  #33  
Old 07-11-2011, 02:15 PM
yabob yabob is offline
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So called "red beer" (not to be confused with terms for actual types of beer) used to appear in some blue collar / workingman's bars in Appalachia, and probably other places. Basically beer with tomato juice. I can't see the appeal, myself.

Since a margarita is made with lime juice, your "beer margarita" would seemingly be pretty close to a shandy, which is traditionally beer and lemonade, often made with beer and some form of citrus based soda these days.
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  #34  
Old 07-11-2011, 02:21 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by yabob View Post
Since a margarita is made with lime juice, your "beer margarita" would seemingly be pretty close to a shandy, which is traditionally beer and lemonade, often made with beer and some form of citrus based soda these days.
Looks like the beer margarita recipes swap out the triple sec, but not the tequila, so it's more margarita than shandy, although it's a cross between the two drinks. You can think of it either as a shandy with tequila, or a margarita with beer. Either seems to be reasonable descriptions of the drink.
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:25 PM
Anamorphic Anamorphic is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Well, no, not really in any meaningful sense. A bloody Mary, to me, is basically a drink based on tomato juice, worcestershire sauce, a citrust, hot sauce, and alcohol, in the standard case, vodka. Swapping out alcohols is not that big a switch. You know how people make "margaritas" with beer sometimes instead of tequila? Same idea, except with a bloody mary. It's in no way similar to making chocolate cake with brocooli instead of chocolate. More like making chocolate cake with, say, rice flour instead of cake flour.
Well, two things: first, I said, "to me", so yes, it does have a meaningful sense... to me. It's taking two ingredients, that, again, to me, work very well together, and switching one of said ingredients out for a third ingredient that sounds like a terrible mix (once again, to me). The fact that they're both alcohol doesn't really make a difference as far as I'm concerned... they're extremely different types of alcohol. Chocolate cake is yummy. Broccoli is yummy. Broccoli cake, not so much (I'm assuming). Bloody Marys are yummy. Beer is yummy. A Bloody Mary made with beer instead of vodka sounds like a waste of beer and bloody mary mix (to me). So... meaningful sense.

And... my comment was meant to be a bit of a joke. I really am not honestly calling into question anyone's taste in drinks. Please don't take any offense.
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  #36  
Old 07-11-2011, 02:32 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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No, sorry if I gave that impression. I'm not taking offense at liking the drink. I just found it strange that you found my analogy to be so odd. It's just that: an analogy. I've successfully indoctrinated people into the wonderful world of Michelada by describing it as a bloody mary with beer, instead of as beer with Clamato or tomato juice. I, too, thought it was the most disgusting idea in the world when I first heard of it. My first exposure was through those Budweiser ads. I was all like, who in the fuck would mix clam and tomato juice in a beer? Then I thought about it some more and realized, you know, this isn't that crazy an idea. Mexican beer tends to be light, and it's not all that different from the idea behind the bloody mary. And you know what? They are not perfect analogues, but if you like alcoholic savory tomato-based drinks, there's a real good chance you'll like the michelada.

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-11-2011 at 02:32 PM..
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  #37  
Old 07-11-2011, 05:07 PM
AnalogSignal AnalogSignal is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Not perfectly safe, but the odds a US egg is infected with Salmonella is something on the level of 1 in 20,000. I enjoy raw eggs from time to time, but there is a minuscule risk involved.
I think it is better to get statistics on this from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) than the food industry (www.incredibleegg.org).

From http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications...997/jan97d.pdf :

Quote:
The CDC also reported that, between 1985 and 1995, there were 582 Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks (two or more people became ill from eating the same food), which accounted for 24,058 cases of illness, 2,290 hospitalizations, and 70 deaths. While many more people may have suffered the illness than what the outbreak data suggest, few seek medical help, so large numbers of cases probably are not reported to the CDC. Raw or undercooked eggs and foods containing them have been implicated in about 80 percent of those Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks in which a food source was identified.
Even though the chances of getting Salmonella are small, why take any risk? No one needs to eat raw eggs.
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Old 07-11-2011, 05:21 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by AnalogSignal View Post
I think it is better to get statistics on this from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) than the food industry (www.incredibleegg.org).
Fine, here's a governmental source.

Quote:
The expected value of this distribution is approximately one SE-affected egg in every 20,000 eggs annually produced, and the 90% certainty interval is between one SE-contaminated egg in 30,000 eggs, and one SE-contaminated egg in 12,000 eggs.
From: Estimating the annual fraction of eggs contaminated with Salmonella enteritidis in the United States.
Ebel E, Schlosser W.
Source
USDA, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Washington, DC, USA. eric.d.ebel@usda.gov


Why take the chance? Because I like raw and undercooked eggs. Same reason I eat beefsteak tartare (where I usually have the raw egg.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 07-11-2011 at 05:25 PM..
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  #39  
Old 07-11-2011, 05:25 PM
MOIDALIZE MOIDALIZE is offline
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Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Sounds about as appealing as Clamato juice in beer.
My mother drinks that. It's okay, I guess.

Malt liquor mixed with orange juice is surprisingly decent.
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  #40  
Old 07-11-2011, 05:55 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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Originally Posted by yabob View Post
In fact, there used to be a saying you don't hear much anymore: "Whaddya want, egg in your beer?". Used when you've already gotten something, but aren't satisfied with it. Implying that egg in your beer is in some way desirable...
My Dad, an active, practicing Mormon, who has never had a beer in his life (he is 87) says this at least once a week, but he is the ONLY person that I have ever heard say it before....

Nice to find out it wasn't just him.
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  #41  
Old 07-12-2011, 07:34 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by AnalogSignal View Post
Even though the chances of getting Salmonella are small, why take any risk? No one needs to eat raw eggs.
No one "needs" to eat eggs period. A raw egg added to a smoothie adds texture and protein. The risk is miniscule if you are not licking the shell, or contaminating the contents of the egg with the exterior. If you are collecting eggs from your own hens, the risk is smaller still.

The times I've felt ill after eating, it has been leftover food that was iffy to begin with.
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