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  #1  
Old 08-03-2011, 06:21 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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Can you REPEAT high school as an adult if you already have a diploma?

I live in the US and have both a High School Diploma and a BS, both of them from accredited institutions (i.e., they are considered valid anywhere in the US and possibly the world).

I pulled off a B average in High School, so many years ago (I think my GPA was around 3.1 or something). I got in to college (not the best school, but a good, respectable one that you can't really be ashamed of).

I have a morbid temptation to redo my high school years. With all the knowledge I've learned in college and in the real world, and all the practical wisdom regarding time management and study skills that I've picked up, I think that, if I could do it over again, I could blow it away and be valedictorian and get a scholarship for MIT.

I know that I could, if I wanted, do another Bachelor's degree and hang a BA in English next to my BS in Computer Science if I put in 2 years or so.

But is there any way to redo high school? Could I rationally gain admittance to a Private School, like one of those old-fashioned "Harry Potter-esque", "good evening, guvnah" style boarding schools? I checked my state's GED program, and one of the prerequisites for taking the test is that you have to establish to the satisfaction of the state that you didn't finish high school, so I'm out on that. Are there alternate High School equivalency programs?

Note: I'm not actually planning to do this - it is a morbid fascination.

Last edited by robert_columbia; 08-03-2011 at 06:22 PM..
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  #2  
Old 08-03-2011, 06:28 PM
Erdosain Erdosain is offline
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I'm pretty sure there is an age cutoff. Even if you didn't have a HS diploma, they can't have 40-year-old guys hanging around a bunch of teenagers.

There was an article in the New Yorker a few years ago about a French guy who looked really young and would enroll in US high schools under false names and ages. He always got caught (so it was clearly against the rules).
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Old 08-03-2011, 06:28 PM
Sateryn76 Sateryn76 is offline
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I have a related question - could I go back and finish?

I'm 34, and often have dreams that I'm back at high school, studying or whatever, when I realize that I'm TOO OLD. Probably not an uncommon dream, and they don't bother me, but I've always wondered.

I have a GED, so I'm sure they would reject me on those grounds, but if I didn't, could I go back and finish?
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  #4  
Old 08-03-2011, 08:43 PM
Rachellelogram Rachellelogram is online now
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My high school had an upper age limit of 21 or 22, something like that. Otherwise, the pervy types would just keep failing over and over again and using school as a free way to meet hot freshmen. The mindset is that if you didn't finish school by then, you were never going to anyway.

Not to mention, it wouldn't be fair to the kids if you came into class with all this life experience, an appreciation for study skills, and knowledge of life as an adult without a diploma, and stole away the valedictorian title and MIT scholarship.

Maybe you could start your own "nontraditional high school" for adults (don't ask me how you'd get the diplomas accredited). But I can't imagine government funding being provided for that kind of endeavor.
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  #5  
Old 08-03-2011, 08:55 PM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
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A few years back, our local school board allowed a 30 something woman to attend high school classes for the three years she needed to graduate. I suppose they thought it was safe in her case since she was highly unattractive and had a child in high school with her. (They graduated the same year.)I thought it was a horrible precedent, but I had no ifluence with the school board.

The oddest thing, to me, was the woman acted just as immature (or just as mature) as her classmates. Odd to see in a woman in her late 30's.
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  #6  
Old 08-03-2011, 09:07 PM
guestchaz guestchaz is offline
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my local school district has night school, or did at least for a while, for older folks who wanted to finish or redo high school, you could take 4 classes per semester and eventually graduate with a genuine diploma instead of a ged
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  #7  
Old 08-03-2011, 10:25 PM
handsomeharry handsomeharry is offline
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Originally Posted by rachelellogram View Post
Not to mention, it wouldn't be fair to the kids if you came into class with all this life experience, an appreciation for study skills, and knowledge of life as an adult without a diploma, and stole away the valedictorian title and MIT scholarship.
I don't think that having these skills, and going to high school at an advanced age would be 'stealing'...These are things that HS valedictorians already have. Just because somebody had to learn it later than somebody in high school doesn't make them a thief.


Best wishes,
hh
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  #8  
Old 08-03-2011, 10:58 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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I thought adult ed. was pretty common. That's how my mother and her best friend finally got their high school diploma. My own high-school had an adult program as well. Neither of these was mixed with the traditional students, though.
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  #9  
Old 08-03-2011, 11:47 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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You might want to check out the story of Jerri Blank, a boozer,a user, and a three time loser, who returns to high school to get a fresh start at 46. She didn't have a diploma but it is still a feel-good story.

Last edited by Shagnasty; 08-03-2011 at 11:50 PM..
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  #10  
Old 08-03-2011, 11:59 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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While this isn't really the same thing, let me note the cases of Lyn Tornabene and Cameron Crowe:

http://www.amazon.com/passed-as-teen...DateDescending

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron_Crowe

Each of them, years after they had graduated from high school, went back to high school for a year pretending to be much younger. They each did it because they wanted to write a book about the experience.

Last edited by Wendell Wagner; 08-03-2011 at 11:59 PM..
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  #11  
Old 08-04-2011, 12:25 AM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is offline
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Teacher checking in.

There is an age limit of 19 in the fall. Older than that and you go to adult education, a separate building. It can give you a GED or even your diploma within 6 months of your failed graduation.
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  #12  
Old 08-04-2011, 01:48 AM
psychonaut psychonaut is offline
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Originally Posted by Mahaloth View Post
Teacher checking in.

There is an age limit of 19 in the fall. Older than that and you go to adult education, a separate building.
In which jurisdiction?
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  #13  
Old 08-04-2011, 04:14 AM
BillJJ BillJJ is offline
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I just can't imagine why someone would want to do this, especially after having already received a BS in college.

Wouldn't it be nice to go back to 8th grade and enter that science fair again? I bet with my training in bioinformatics I could blow all those kids science projects out of the water.

I don't get it.
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  #14  
Old 08-04-2011, 05:33 AM
Namkcalb Namkcalb is offline
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Originally Posted by Mahaloth View Post
Teacher checking in.

There is an age limit of 19 in the fall. Older than that and you go to adult education, a separate building. It can give you a GED or even your diploma within 6 months of your failed graduation.
I think 19 is way too low, many people repeat a year or two or spend an extra year settling into a new country.
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  #15  
Old 08-04-2011, 08:03 AM
BigT BigT is offline
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Originally Posted by BillJJ View Post
I just can't imagine why someone would want to do this, especially after having already received a BS in college.

Wouldn't it be nice to go back to 8th grade and enter that science fair again? I bet with my training in bioinformatics I could blow all those kids science projects out of the water.

I don't get it.
midlife crisis?
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  #16  
Old 08-04-2011, 10:08 AM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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I literally have nightmares about this scenario a couple times a year. I'll be back in school, taking classes, and then realize I've already taken the class, except now I've forgotten that the big paper is due today and there's a class I was supposed to take that I've never attended, and so on.
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  #17  
Old 08-04-2011, 10:16 AM
Anne Neville Anne Neville is offline
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
I literally have nightmares about this scenario a couple times a year. I'll be back in school, taking classes, and then realize I've already taken the class, except now I've forgotten that the big paper is due today and there's a class I was supposed to take that I've never attended, and so on.
I have dreams where I have to go back to high school, too. I'm always very relieved to wake up and realize that they were just dreams. Please tell me an adult can't be forced to go back to high school for any reason.
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  #18  
Old 08-04-2011, 10:56 AM
guizot guizot is offline
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In which jurisdiction?
If you're asking about the jurisdiction that sets ed code then it's obviously the state. (And obviously it's the local school district that implements it.) And this particular code is probably the same throughout all the states. I've never heard of any state that let's anyone over 19 enroll in K-12 without some kind of very unusual exception (i.e., mental disability, etc.). People who haven't finished high school by age 19 go to adult ed/continuing ed programs, or whatever local term they have for it. (Sometimes it's a division of K-12, and sometimes it's part of a community college system.)

It seems even less likely for someone who's already finished high school to do this. Public schools are mandated for very different reasons from things like public parks, which are provided for recreational purposes.
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  #19  
Old 08-04-2011, 11:10 AM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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I can tell you one thing. During the summer between my junior and senior years in high school, I took a scholarship to summer school at a university 4 hours away from home. Lived on campus in the dorms with a bunch of other 16-17 year old high school students. Finished my summer credits (got a head start on my classmates!) and then went back to high school to finish my senior year.

It was horrible.

For one thing, the rules are very restrictive. You've been an adult for a while now and are probably out of the habit of asking the authority in the room if you can go to the bathroom. If you are one minute late to class, you wouldn't sweat it much, but the teacher might sweat you. You've been on your own, independent, and able to make decisions for yourself for a long time in regard to how you manage your time and schedule and decisions. You've probably forgotten how controlled all that stuff is in high school. It is really really really difficult to go from being treated like a responsible, discerning adult and then put yourself back in that "obedient to authority" mode. My senior year, I'd forget to ask for a hall pass. I'd just get up and go wherever I wanted to go. And got in trouble for it all the time. It pissed me off that I'd already been trusted with the responsibility of meeting my academic obligations but I still had to have my hand held by the high school teachers. It's rage-inducing. (At least it was when I was 17. I was a walking attitude problem.)

The other thing is the material is boring. It's all very slowly spoon fed to you. I barely remember cracking a book in high school at all. After my college summer school experience (in which I'd taken Freshman Comp), my high school senior-level composition class was like going back to kindergarden. My teacher knew I'd gotten an A in the college-level class, so he ignored me when I flat out fell asleep in his class. He once woke me to answer a grammar question -- he knew I knew the answer and nobody else in the class did, so he apologized for waking me and then asked me to explain the finer point of grammar he was explaining. We had a talk about it at the beginning of the semester and he let me know he understood the position I was in, but the class was required for graduation, so I had to sit through it. I phoned it in and still pulled an A.

If you could stand the oppressive and often arbitrary rule-making, and you could handle the boredom, and you could be bothered with all the standardized test bubble filling in, you could probably rock a 4.0 blindfolded with your hands tied behind your back.

I say try one of those online high school programs (both my sister's kids got their diplomas this way). That way you could skip the standardized assessments, arbitrary rules, and you can whip through the material at a pace that might not be quite as boring.
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  #20  
Old 08-04-2011, 11:21 AM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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My stepson is taking on-line high school courses to get his diploma. He just turned twenty, and if he had not been already enrolled in the last few classes that he has to take, would have had to give up the online deal and go attend adult education classes for a GED.
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  #21  
Old 08-04-2011, 11:41 AM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is offline
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Just googling for "maximum high school age" I found:

Palm Beach Schools:
Quote:
A person who is involved in a continuous program of study may be enrolled in a regular high school program through the end of the semester in which he/she reaches twenty-one (21) years of age. A person is deemed in a continuous program of study even though such program was interrupted by military service or illness.
SDPBC Student Progression Plans FY11 H/3 Effective September 7, 2010
A person who has not been enrolled in a continuous program of study and who has attained the age of twenty (20) years of age on or before the opening of the school year shall not be enrolled in any regular high program. A nineteen (19) year-old person who has had a break in enrollment (see exception above), who will reach twenty (20) years of age during the school year, may enroll in a regular high school program and remain enrolled until the end of that school year.
Collier County:
Quote:
In order to provide reasonable consistency of maturity levels among students in the regular high school program, no person shall be permitted to attend the regular high school program after attaining the age of twenty-one (21). Those who attain the age of twenty-one (21) during a school year may complete that school year. Persons who are eighteen (18) years old or older and who, by earning eight (8) credits per academic year, cannot meet graduation requirements, including grade point average (GPA), prior to the end of the school year during which they attain the age of twenty-one (21), shall not be permitted to attend the regular high school program beyond the end of the academic year in which they attain the age of eighteen (18). Such persons shall be afforded an opportunity to pursue a high school diploma through the Adult High School or General Educational Development (GED) programs of the District.
Texas news story:
Quote:
The state used to provide funding for high school students up age to age 20, or 21 for special education students. But a law, now in effect, allows people up to age 25 to enroll in high school.
New York City:
Quote:
Transfer Schools accept students between the ages of 14 and 21, but each school has its own specific requirements. Contact the school of your choice for more information. YABCs serve students between the ages of 17.5 and 21. GED programs serve students over the age of 18.
Keep in mind that the Department of Education serves students through the end of the school year in which they turn 21. The school year begins on July 1, so if you turn 21 on July 2 you may attend school through the following June, but if you turn 21 on June 15 you may attend school only for two more weeks.
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  #22  
Old 08-04-2011, 01:45 PM
Serenata67 Serenata67 is offline
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You could be this local woman. Then again, she got into trouble about the whole thing.
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  #23  
Old 08-04-2011, 02:39 PM
Smurfie Smurfie is offline
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Adults should not be going to school with children. 19 cutoff sounds good to me.
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  #24  
Old 08-04-2011, 03:10 PM
kaltkalt kaltkalt is offline
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I bet there is a private school that, despite an age cutoff, would let you attend classes if (1) you don't have any pedophilia sex crimes on your record and (2) you paid 2-3x regular tuition.

I actually think, despite maturity and study skills, it would be very hard to go back and redo a lot of high school classes. After being away from school for so long, it would be VERY hard to get back into that mode. Maybe there's an advantage of not having to be involved in all that social crap... the parties, trying to get laid all the time, etc. Still, if you got a B the first time around I think most people would do worse than that the second time around. Not better. I think it's extremely naiave to think you'd end up valedictorian based on what you've learned as an adult. I actually think it would be a pretty embarassing experience for 99% of adults.
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  #25  
Old 08-04-2011, 03:58 PM
HeyHomie HeyHomie is offline
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A related question: Could a high-school graduate (and college graduate, in my case) take the GED? I've always though about taking it just for shits & giggles, and to see how I'd do.
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  #26  
Old 08-04-2011, 04:35 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Actually, it’s pretty easy if you can find the right circumstances. You can make the same wish as some hapless teen (timing is important on that one), find a Zoltar Speaks machine, piss in a magic fountain...
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  #27  
Old 08-04-2011, 05:32 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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Originally Posted by HeyHomie View Post
A related question: Could a high-school graduate (and college graduate, in my case) take the GED?...
http://www.acenet.edu/Content/Naviga...tm#eligibility

This seems to indicate that if you already have a high school diploma, then you cannot take the test.

Last edited by robert_columbia; 08-04-2011 at 05:36 PM..
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  #28  
Old 08-04-2011, 06:32 PM
Romeo and Whatsherface Romeo and Whatsherface is offline
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All of the high schools I'm aware of have 22 established as the maximum age for students, in part due to federal regulations and funding (which stops when students are 22), and in part due to concerns about having twenty-somethings hanging with kids in their early teens.

Your other problem would be your transcript. The grades you earned today would not replace the grades you earned as a teen (A 16-yr.-old who fails US History, retakes it, and passes it gets both the original F and the better grade factored into her GPA.), so you probably wouldn't be able to get that 4.0+ you're hoping for. This would most likely be the case even if you attended a different high school than you did as a tad.

I'm a high school teacher, and I'd love to teach a class of adult second-time-arounders. A lot of para-educators who've helped students in my classes say they learned a lot more than they did when they first went to high school. I'm all for it--if it wouldn't drain already-scarce funding.
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  #29  
Old 08-04-2011, 07:08 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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I know someone closely who doesn't have a have a high school diploma or a GED but she does have a bachelors degree in Chemical Engineering and a PhD in clinical psychology. She is a college professor now. She dropped out of high school when her mother died and ran away from home. A few years later, she went to community college to take classes and worked her way up from that. I suppose she would be technically eligible to go to GED night school and that would make a pretty good joke. If it were me, I would make the instructor call me Dr.
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  #30  
Old 08-05-2011, 10:09 AM
Tibby or Not Tibby Tibby or Not Tibby is online now
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
I literally have nightmares about this scenario a couple times a year. I'll be back in school, taking classes, and then realize I've already taken the class, except now I've forgotten that the big paper is due today and there's a class I was supposed to take that I've never attended, and so on.
This reminds me of a common dream of my own:

As the fog of unconsciousness clears I find myself flying high in the sky, not knowing where I’m headed. Then, suddenly I lose my flight ability and begin to fall…and fall…a very great distance, until landing at the entrance-way to my old High School. I get up, only to see a quite agitated Velociraptor in the courtyard, hop-running toward me, constricted pupils locked on mine, closing in fast. I turn to flee into the school for refuge, but realize that my feet are hopelessly stuck in molasses and my forward progression is in slow motion. I free my feet in the nick of time, enter, slam the door on the raptors head, which explodes into a mass of writhing snakes, and continue, with fast beating heart and sweaty brow down the long, desolate hallway, remembering I’m late for a critical test. But I don’t remember where my classroom is. After much trial and error, I find the class, take my seat, look over the test sheet and realize that I’m completely unprepared and know none of the test answers. With mounting test-anxiety, I grind my teeth until they all crumble and fall out of my mouth. I hear laughter—a few titters at first, but quickly snowballing into a symphony of derisive belly laughs—and believe my teacher and classmates are finding humor in my unfortunate dental situation. That is, until I realize that I’m completely naked and everyone is pointing at my genitals that have mysteriously become very small and oddly shaped. Well, from that point on, the dream gets a little bizzare, so I won't bore you with the details...but it's the same dream I have once or twice each night. Luckily my nightmares are much less frequent.

Anyone else have this dream?
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“Do you believe in such nonsense?” "No, but they say it works even if you don't believe in it.”—Niels Bohr
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  #31  
Old 08-05-2011, 03:49 PM
alphaboi867 alphaboi867 is offline
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Some private prep (& usually boarding as well) schools in the US offer a "post-graduate year" (or 13th grade), but I think that's usually meant for international students wanting to improve their English & better prepare for study at American colleges. In any event these students probally wouldn't be any older than 20.

On a related note both exchange students at my HS senior year had already finished secondary school in their home countries (Georgia & Thailand) so they were technically high school graduates enrolled in high school again. The Georgian turned 19 during the school year, but so did 2 other regular students.
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  #32  
Old 08-06-2011, 02:49 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
I literally have nightmares about this scenario a couple times a year. I'll be back in school, taking classes, and then realize I've already taken the class, except now I've forgotten that the big paper is due today and there's a class I was supposed to take that I've never attended, and so on.
Only a couple times a year?
Anyway, I doubt anyone has not had that dream. A good quickie bit in the move Top Secret has the hero being tortured/whipped, drifting into a I can't find my room/I didn't know a test was scheduled-type dream, and when he wakes up sighs in relief although still being whipped.

That sentence was longer than the bit.
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  #33  
Old 08-06-2011, 02:50 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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What I would like to repeat is the getting stoned, getting laid part.
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  #34  
Old 08-06-2011, 04:08 PM
rbroome rbroome is offline
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Originally Posted by robert_columbia View Post
I live in the US and have both a High School Diploma and a BS, both of them from accredited institutions (i.e., they are considered valid anywhere in the US and possibly the world).

I pulled off a B average in High School, so many years ago (I think my GPA was around 3.1 or something). I got in to college (not the best school, but a good, respectable one that you can't really be ashamed of).

I have a morbid temptation to redo my high school years. With all the knowledge I've learned in college and in the real world, and all the practical wisdom regarding time management and study skills that I've picked up, I think that, if I could do it over again, I could blow it away and be valedictorian and get a scholarship for MIT.

I know that I could, if I wanted, do another Bachelor's degree and hang a BA in English next to my BS in Computer Science if I put in 2 years or so.

But is there any way to redo high school? Could I rationally gain admittance to a Private School, like one of those old-fashioned "Harry Potter-esque", "good evening, guvnah" style boarding schools? I checked my state's GED program, and one of the prerequisites for taking the test is that you have to establish to the satisfaction of the state that you didn't finish high school, so I'm out on that. Are there alternate High School equivalency programs?

Note: I'm not actually planning to do this - it is a morbid fascination.
around here you can't stay in HS after the age of 18, 21 for special ed students. So, no you wouldn't be allowed in. OTOH, you can probably go for a GED, no age limit there.
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  #35  
Old 06-03-2012, 06:22 PM
eldiablito2 eldiablito2 is offline
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i have a question

if ur over 22 u can't go back 2 high school
i have a question if im 19 year old and i have a high school diploma can i go back to high school to take the SAT ?
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  #36  
Old 06-03-2012, 06:31 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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Originally Posted by eldiablito2 View Post
if ur over 22 u can't go back 2 high school
i have a question if im 19 year old and i have a high school diploma can i go back to high school to take the SAT ?
Dude, high school would do you a world of good. Please attempt to enroll immediately.
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  #37  
Old 06-03-2012, 06:54 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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While my high school was nothing to brag about it did have one thing. More courses that were probably worth taking than I had time to take. Even back then I had this idea. Purposely fail for a year or two so I could take those extra courses. An extra year or two of some useful and marketable vocational tech courses, some extra languages, some of the science I didn't have enough time for? All for free? If my home life had been really bad/impoverished I think I could have easily gone for at least one extra year at that time.
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  #38  
Old 06-03-2012, 08:08 PM
LurkerInNJ LurkerInNJ is offline
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I had an older relative who had to quit school after the 8th grade to help support her family. When things got better financially, she started high school in her 20's. This was at the turn of the 20th century.
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  #39  
Old 06-03-2012, 08:34 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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You have to forget about the MIT scholarship unless you have near perfect SAT scores. There is a valedictorian in very high school in America but very few of them would be admitted to MIT at all let alone get a scholarship. You could try a version of this as an experiment. Take the SAT again and see how you do. I don't think your score will have changed much at all. It is essentially an IQ test but feel free to prove me wrong.
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  #40  
Old 06-03-2012, 09:07 PM
clairobscur clairobscur is offline
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Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
What I would like to repeat is the getting stoned, getting laid part.
There was a getting laid part?



I get the same dream as everybody else. I generally eventually realize I'm way too old for high school but not that I shouldn't be there. I just think about how shameful it is to not have been able to graduate from high school yet (and I'm going to fail again since I didn't prepare this exam I'm about to pass).
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  #41  
Old 06-04-2012, 01:32 AM
Fubaya Fubaya is offline
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Could a 30 year old actually tolerate being surrounded by hundreds of teenagers for more than a couple of days? They seem ok when they come in our businesses or we see them in a store, but on their turf surrounded by their friends, they're really freaking annoying.
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:01 AM
AboutAsWeirdAsYouCanGet AboutAsWeirdAsYouCanGet is offline
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There is an age limit of 19 in the fall. Older than that and you go to adult education, a separate building. It can give you a GED or even your diploma within 6 months of your failed graduation.
Kids on an IEP can stay in school until they are 21/22, and in Michigan 26.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:46 AM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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Originally Posted by Fubaya View Post
Could a 30 year old actually tolerate being surrounded by hundreds of teenagers for more than a couple of days?
Teachers seem to survive okay. Sorta mostly.
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Old 06-04-2012, 11:19 AM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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Originally Posted by billfish678 View Post
Teachers seem to survive okay. Sorta mostly.
Actually, when I had to interact with teachers in setting like the community theatre, it was amazing how childish and petty some seemed. I thought this was because they were used to absolute authority, being listened to and obeyed without being questioned, while anyone who acted that way in an office setting would be told to F o pretty fast and frequently.

I recall a High School Teacher TV show episode from the 70's about some kid who was showing promise as a star pitcher for the HS baseball team during tryouts. Then the teacher mentioned that he had spent a year in the army in Vietnam after lying about his age; the coach told him - the cutoff for high school league baseball was 18 years old and a 19yo was ineligible to play no matter how good he was.

So there are limits on other activities besides class itself.
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Old 06-04-2012, 12:06 PM
BlinkingDuck BlinkingDuck is offline
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Originally Posted by Namkcalb View Post
I think 19 is way too low, many people repeat a year or two or spend an extra year settling into a new country.
I disagree. You shouldn't have adults as students in the same school as children. Giving them till 19-20 is enough.

In addition, the tax burden needs to be cutoff or greatly lessened for people that can't graduate HS by 19-20. At some point we have to say...we tried but schooling looks like it isn't for you. If you wish to continue, then you or someone you know needs to start paying for it.
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Old 06-04-2012, 01:31 PM
pravnik pravnik is offline
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Originally Posted by Tibby or Not Tibby View Post
This reminds me of a common dream of my own:

As the fog of unconsciousness clears I find myself flying high in the sky, not knowing where I’m headed. Then, suddenly I lose my flight ability and begin to fall…and fall…a very great distance, until landing at the entrance-way to my old High School. I get up, only to see a quite agitated Velociraptor in the courtyard, hop-running toward me, constricted pupils locked on mine, closing in fast. I turn to flee into the school for refuge, but realize that my feet are hopelessly stuck in molasses and my forward progression is in slow motion. I free my feet in the nick of time, enter, slam the door on the raptors head, which explodes into a mass of writhing snakes, and continue, with fast beating heart and sweaty brow down the long, desolate hallway, remembering I’m late for a critical test. But I don’t remember where my classroom is. After much trial and error, I find the class, take my seat, look over the test sheet and realize that I’m completely unprepared and know none of the test answers. With mounting test-anxiety, I grind my teeth until they all crumble and fall out of my mouth. I hear laughter—a few titters at first, but quickly snowballing into a symphony of derisive belly laughs—and believe my teacher and classmates are finding humor in my unfortunate dental situation. That is, until I realize that I’m completely naked and everyone is pointing at my genitals that have mysteriously become very small and oddly shaped. Well, from that point on, the dream gets a little bizzare, so I won't bore you with the details...but it's the same dream I have once or twice each night. Luckily my nightmares are much less frequent.

Anyone else have this dream?
Ooh, that could be bad. Have you been checked for brain worms?
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  #47  
Old 06-05-2012, 07:03 AM
F. U. Shakespeare F. U. Shakespeare is offline
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There was a story in the Washington Post about 15 years ago about a guy who assumed a false identity to attend an area high school. I think he was in his 20's, but looked younger. The law definitely got involved, but I think the false identity thing made it worse - there were undertones that he was doing it to ogle underage boys/girls. IIRC, he used the surname Spielberg, and claimed that the director was his uncle.
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Old 07-15-2012, 10:28 PM
Duamer Duamer is offline
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I also have a HS diploma, as well as a GED, and would like to repeat HS over again. Despite my best efforts negotiate for tougher classes I never received the education I needed. I'm even having trouble finding equivalent courses in any local community colleges.

I found one school in Canada, but I'm not one hundred percent sure it will take me where I need to be. I would prefer a school in the US, doesn't have to be public, just secular.

Oh and BlinkingDuck, it's so easy to steal a kids future by doing "what's best for them."
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  #49  
Old 07-15-2012, 10:41 PM
Duamer Duamer is offline
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Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
I literally have nightmares about this scenario a couple times a year. I'll be back in school, taking classes, and then realize I've already taken the class, except now I've forgotten that the big paper is due today and there's a class I was supposed to take that I've never attended, and so on.
I have nightmares about trying to solve a problem, but can't because I was put in the remedial math classes. I have panic attacks about all the adults I talked to in HS, how they manipulated me because of my naivete. I'm constantly depressed about how the world is turning to shit and I'm not smart enough to fix it.
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  #50  
Old 07-16-2012, 09:18 AM
ScarletNumber ScarletNumber is offline
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In some state constitutions, one is only guaranteed a "free public education" between the ages of 5 and 18, so if one wanted to continue after that, it could be expensive. This is also why some places charge for Pre-K.

Rick Rosner went to HS a few times under aliases.
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