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  #1  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:10 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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Fleas - even after Frontline what do you do?

I applied the Frontline as usual. I put drops between the shoulders, middle of back and base of tail. Used the entire monthly dispenser.

two weeks later I see fleas on the dog. Which means fleas are being introduced in the house.

I even fudged and used some Frontline spray that I still had. Worked it into the coat. So now doggie has a double treatment this month.

Still seeing an occasional flea on the dog. WFT????

What do you do in this situation? How do you treat the dogs bedding? How about spot treating the dog? Is that a idea? What to use?

My vet said fleas are getting resistant to Frontline and he suggested switching to Advantage.

But still. The same problem. It's only applied once a month. What should I do if the dog picks up fleas when he's outside peeing?

I hate fleas. Hate the bastards. Don't want them on me or in my damn house.
Help!!!!

Last edited by aceplace57; 08-15-2011 at 03:13 PM..
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  #2  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:17 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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Follow the vet recommendations and change products. You could ask, if your dog is going occasionally to flea infested areas, for some Capstar. This will immediately kill the dog but only lasts for a day. See what the vet says, the capstar may help for a few days while the Advantage kicks in.

If the dog is on a prescribed monthly preventive that the fleas are not resistant to, it should last for the whole month. Heck, some of them probably last a bit longer than a month (but say "apply every 40 days" is harder than "just apply it on the 1/15th/30th of the month"). OTOH, some products like Advantage could potentially wear off if you're costantly bathing the dog, in which case, you can reapply more frequently.

BTW, Advantage and Frontline both use different chemicals, so there is a very good chance that the fleas that are resistant to Frontline have not yet developed the resistance to Advantage.
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  #3  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:24 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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I had great success eradicating fleas with Adams products. Once the house was a flea-free zone, we started the dog on one of the heartworm + flea control products and never had a problem again for the rest of that dog's life. IIRC, we tried the spot-on products, but they were just vastly more trouble than they were worth for us, since we had to give him a heartworm pill anyway.
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  #4  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:25 PM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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I had the same problem with Frontine a couple of years ago when we had a bad flea-year. Vet # 1 said, the reason you are seeing active fleas is because they get hyperactive right before they drop dead. Which doesn't help if you have a dog or cat who is allergic to flea bites. however, most spot treatments only work because a flea has to land on your pet before keeling over...were you using Frontline (fipronil) plain or the Frontline that kills the eggs?

Vet #2 said he'd stopped dispensing Frontline because of perceived resistance and was prescribing Revolution or Sentinel instead. However, this year is another bad one for fleas and I was seeing them after 2-3 weeks on Revolution. I switched back to generic Frontline from Wal-Mart (I have foster dogs, plus treat some outdoor cats and it's much cheaper) and so far, so good. One of my dogs is flea-allerigc, so he's my early warning system. If he starts scratching: there's fleas.

I know people who swear by DE for treating the home and yard. Others think this is woo. I've not used it so have no opinion but IMO it's probably worth a try.

My strategy so far is switching flea meds - I never use the crap Hartz products or Bio-Spot or any of those things. Advantage or generic Frontline now available OTC, or Revolution/Sentinel from the vet.
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  #5  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:45 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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A few years ago I had a bitch of a time with fleas, and Frontline didn't work - Revolution did the trick though.
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  #6  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:51 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KarlGrenze View Post
You could ask, if your dog is going occasionally to flea infested areas, for some Capstar. This will immediately kill the dog but only lasts for a day.
The Old Yeller approach is a little drastic, no?
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  #7  
Old 08-15-2011, 03:53 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
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OP: Is the dog your only furry pet? Any chance you have mice or rats in the house?
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  #8  
Old 08-15-2011, 04:03 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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No rats right now. A few years ago I had some. My pest control guy set out bait boxes and I haven't seen one in at least 5 years.

Is anyone treating the dogs bedding with spray or powder? I have a crate cushion in my dogs crate and a towel on top. Every couple weeks I wash the towel and replace. Before putting it in the washing machine, I first soak the towel in the laundry sink with some bleach in the water for half an hour. I've been told that will kill any flea eggs. Then I rinse it and run it through the washer.

Last edited by aceplace57; 08-15-2011 at 04:05 PM..
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  #9  
Old 08-15-2011, 04:54 PM
belladonna belladonna is offline
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Any chance the fleas have taken up residence in your carpet or furniture? Do you ever see them not on the dog?

I had fleas in my house last summer, I would treat the dog and within days they'd be all over her again. What ended up working was Borax powder. Sprinkled onto rugs, carpets, inside couch crevices, under furniture, mattresses, etc. Sit for an hour or two, vacuum up the exposed areas (I left it beneath the beds and couches), and repeat about a week later. Cost me $6 and a bit of time but it totally did the trick.
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  #10  
Old 08-15-2011, 05:17 PM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I know people who swear by DE for treating the home and yard. Others think this is woo. I've not used it so have no opinion but IMO it's probably worth a try.
DE?
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  #11  
Old 08-15-2011, 05:25 PM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ike Witt View Post
DE?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth
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  #12  
Old 08-15-2011, 06:45 PM
thelabdude thelabdude is offline
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I have seen a number of reports of Frontline not working. I have also seen reports that it is due to counterfeit Frontline. With the wealth of good products on the market, it may be easier to just change. Much of the time since the good stuff came out we have only had one healthy young dog in the house. We mostly haven't used anything and have had very little trouble. Got into a mess when we took unprotected Gretchen to visit my sister's flea bitten cats. Also, Tux at the state fair. I think they jumped him when I let him relieve himself outside the cattle barn. A dose of Capstar cleared him up in time to take first place in his class.

Since we have had little trouble without anything, it is hard for me to say the Revolution or Sentinel did much when we have used it. I sometimes do douse the dogs with Ovitrol before going where there may be fleas. Thanks to this thread reminding me to before the state fair.
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  #13  
Old 08-15-2011, 07:53 PM
Red Stilettos Red Stilettos is online now
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The spot-on stuff has never worked for Stella. No one believes me, but I have successfully used the spot-on stuff on other dogs and my cat, but no dice with Stella. I think it's because she doesn't have a lot of coat oils so it doesn't spread correctly. Regardless, I've tried everything else to get rid of fleas. The best thing yet is Comfortis, which is basically a monthly version of Capstar. Works great and provides indirect protection for the cat, too.

Also, during the worst of flea season, I bathe her with Zodiac flea shampoo, even when I don't see any fleas. I think it helps keep her from bringing them in from outside. I can't prove that, just a suspicion.

Before Comfortis, I used Enforcer house spray to get rid of fleas in the house. I sprayed my carpets and her bed every few months. Seemed to help. You can get it at Home Depot, Walmart, etc.
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  #14  
Old 08-15-2011, 08:30 PM
SeaDragonTattoo SeaDragonTattoo is online now
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I agree with switching to Advantage. The biggest difference between Frontline and Advantage, IMO, is staying power through bathing or swimming. Frontline lasts through those better than Advantage does, but if you're in an area where the fleas are resistant to Frontline, then switching to Advantage and applying more frequently if there is much bathing or swimming going on, might be the best approach.
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  #15  
Old 08-15-2011, 09:15 PM
lindsaybluth lindsaybluth is offline
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Another vote for Advantage. Vet recommended the switch last time.
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  #16  
Old 08-15-2011, 09:27 PM
pbbth pbbth is offline
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Originally Posted by belladonna View Post
Any chance the fleas have taken up residence in your carpet or furniture? Do you ever see them not on the dog?

I had fleas in my house last summer, I would treat the dog and within days they'd be all over her again. What ended up working was Borax powder. Sprinkled onto rugs, carpets, inside couch crevices, under furniture, mattresses, etc. Sit for an hour or two, vacuum up the exposed areas (I left it beneath the beds and couches), and repeat about a week later. Cost me $6 and a bit of time but it totally did the trick.

We did something similar. We frontlined the animals, put all the blankets and bedding through the wash on hot water, and got a cheap $4 can of flea powder and dusted every piece of furniture in the house. Let it sit for an hour or two and vacuumed it up and immediately emptied the vacuum into the outside garbage. Haven't seen a flea on an animal in the house since.
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  #17  
Old 08-15-2011, 09:54 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
The Old Yeller approach is a little drastic, no?
Heh, thanks for catching that . Capstar will immediately kill all the fleas, but it lasts only one day. OTOH, that may be all that is needed to protect the dog from flea infestation and letting it out for a while until the new med (Advangate) kicks in.
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  #18  
Old 08-15-2011, 10:01 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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thelabdude, just in case, you may ask for some Capstar, if it's a one day thing. Less mess than a bath, and very effective.
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  #19  
Old 08-15-2011, 10:17 PM
Postariti Postariti is offline
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One more vote for Advantage. We put Frontline on our cat this year, and he still had fleas. We put Advantage on him, and within an hour dying fleas were falling off.
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  #20  
Old 08-15-2011, 10:27 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Stilettos View Post
I think it's because she doesn't have a lot of coat oils so it doesn't spread correctly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaDragonTattoo View Post
I agree with switching to Advantage. The biggest difference between Frontline and Advantage, IMO, is staying power through bathing or swimming. Frontline lasts through those better than Advantage does, but if you're in an area where the fleas are resistant to Frontline, then switching to Advantage and applying more frequently if there is much bathing or swimming going on, might be the best approach.
I think both of you are mistaken about how these products work. They are absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream, they don't just spread everywhere on the outside of your pet's fur. Bathing your pet or allowing it to go swimming a few days after application should have no effect on their staying power.

ETA: And I think applying more frequently after bathing or swimming is a very bad idea.

Last edited by voltaire; 08-15-2011 at 10:31 PM..
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  #21  
Old 08-15-2011, 10:28 PM
Rushgeekgirl Rushgeekgirl is offline
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I use Advantage on the cats and dogs every spring.
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  #22  
Old 08-16-2011, 04:27 AM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
I think both of you are mistaken about how these products work. They are absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream, they don't just spread everywhere on the outside of your pet's fur. Bathing your pet or allowing it to go swimming a few days after application should have no effect on their staying power.

ETA: And I think applying more frequently after bathing or swimming is a very bad idea.
They don't go into the bloodstream, they're absorbed into the follicles or oil glands in the skin.

I do agree it's probably not a good idea to use them more frequently than recommened, though.
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  #23  
Old 08-16-2011, 06:12 AM
Merneith Merneith is online now
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Switch to Advantage. It's the difference between prescription vs. over the counter stuff.
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  #24  
Old 08-16-2011, 06:48 AM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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Most of these products can be used more frequently than once a month. This should be done, just in case, with the vet's consent. But prescribed anti-flea drugs have a higher margin of safety that makes it possible to apply more frequently and also last a bit longer than what the usual label reads, especially if it has been given continuously for months/years.

Also, IIRC, yes, Advantage does have the disadvantage of being able to be washed off. If they were able to go systemic, most of them would also be able to deal with intestinal parasites.

Neither Advantage nor Frontline can go systemic, they treat cutaneous parasites. For systemic control, you may be thinking more about other products.

Merneith, Frontline was one of the first prescribed anti-flea products. The thing is, many of them are now at the stage they can go generic and be found OTC. Frontline is one of them. Don't knock put it anywhere near the same category as Hartz and other products.
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  #25  
Old 08-16-2011, 06:52 AM
PapSett PapSett is offline
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Agreed- Frontline stopped working for my gang, but Advantage still kicks the fleas' asses. My vet said he no longer recommends Frontline.
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  #26  
Old 08-16-2011, 08:34 AM
Red Stilettos Red Stilettos is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
I think both of you are mistaken about how these products work. They are absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream, they don't just spread everywhere on the outside of your pet's fur. Bathing your pet or allowing it to go swimming a few days after application should have no effect on their staying power.

ETA: And I think applying more frequently after bathing or swimming is a very bad idea.
When I use spot-ons on Stella, she has an oily spot on her back for a couple of weeks and fleas on her belly. They don't work on her the same way they have on my other dogs. Systemic meds (capstar and comfortis) do work on her. My interpretation of that is that it's something different about her outside not her inside. Plus, the spot ons are not systemic.
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  #27  
Old 08-16-2011, 09:27 AM
Yarster Yarster is offline
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Glad to see it's not just me having this problem. My dog brought fleas in from the outside, which gave the cats fleas, and then got them in the carpet where they started biting my wife and I. We still use the Frontline because we bought a boatload of it at Costco at the time, but like you, it seems not to work. I assume this was because the carpet was serving as a base for them to constantly re-attack the dog and cat. I took the dog and cat to Petco to have them get a professional flea bath and sprayed all the carpet and furniture with Zodiac, which seems to have solved the problem for the moment. A spray can that covers 2000 square feet was $19.95 and you didn't have to vacuum it up.

I called Terminex and some of their competitors. Their 'service' was a minimum of $200, and it basically consisted of them having you:

1) Move all your furniture away from the walls
2) Move everything off the floors (clothes, shoes, etc.)
3) Wash all bedding in hot water
4) Vacuum every day for 21 days when they would come back and apply their powder a second time, at which point you had to vacuum every day again

Since I would be doing 99% of the work in this service situation, I naturally told them to jump in a lake and at that point I could do 100% of it and just buy the spray/powder myself. I'm not sure how many of their customer actually agree to their ridiculous non-service given how much work the customer does. And by the way, if the powder/spray is non-toxic to dogs/cats, and it is what kills the fleas by drying them out, don't I NOT want to vacuum it up?
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  #28  
Old 08-16-2011, 02:08 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
They don't go into the bloodstream, they're absorbed into the follicles or oil glands in the skin.

I do agree it's probably not a good idea to use them more frequently than recommened, though.
I may have been wrong to suggest that their primary method of action is by entering the bloodstream, but they do enter the bloodstream to some extent.
Quote:
A previously submitted study (MRID #43577715) in which radiolabeled fipronil was administered to dogs at a high dose
(10 mg/kg) demonstrated that the chemical is absorbed systemically. Plasma levels of radioactivity were detected from day 2 to day 30 post-treatment.
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/chemic...129121-85b.pdf
Regardless, my point stands that they are absorbed into the hair follicles, skin and fat, and that it can be dangerous and unnecessary to casually reapply these known neurotoxins every time your dog is bathed or goes swimming.
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  #29  
Old 08-16-2011, 02:38 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is online now
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I ordered Advantage II from pet meds.

I looked at K9 Advantix II. But even their information says it stings the dogs skin for a day or two. I didn't want to use this stuff unless nothing else works.

My dog is short haired and almost never gets wet. Advantage II should be fine. At least its a different chemical from Frontline. Time for the fleas to die!!!!!!!

Last edited by aceplace57; 08-16-2011 at 02:39 PM..
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  #30  
Old 08-16-2011, 05:10 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
... I know people who swear by DE for treating the home and yard. Others think this is woo. I've not used it so have no opinion but IMO it's probably worth a try...
I have. It's not woo - DE messes up an insect's exoskeleton, so they die via dehydration. It kills any hard-bodied insect: roaches, ants, fleas, beetles, etc. (For the same reason, it kills beneficials like ladybugs.) It's not a fast-acting solution, more of a long-term preventative. Shake it over your pet's bedding, into the carpet, around the edges of their main room, etc. I like to shake some outside around doors (our house isn't well-sealed) and windows.

If Poochie is bringing in fleas from your backyard, you can buy beneficial nematodes at some garden centers - they help control fleas in the grass that come from squirrels, possums, raccoons, etc.
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  #31  
Old 08-16-2011, 06:10 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Nuke them from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.
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  #32  
Old 08-16-2011, 07:21 PM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
I may have been wrong to suggest that their primary method of action is by entering the bloodstream, but they do enter the bloodstream to some extent. Regardless, my point stands that they are absorbed into the hair follicles, skin and fat, and that it can be dangerous and unnecessary to casually reapply these known neurotoxins every time your dog is bathed or goes swimming.
I was incorrect - Revolution does enter the bloodstream. Frontline (fipronil) stays in the follicles and oil glands.
I absolutely agree that applying these products willy-nilly is not a great idea....I can go several years without fleas being a problem (Michigan) and then have a horrendous year. I only use flea meds if I see a single flea - not automatically or prophylactically.

I think DE would be a safe addition to flea-killing arsenal around the house and yard....because I don't live in a terrible area for fleas and take action right away if I see any, I've never had to resort to a big systemic attack on the little buggers.
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  #33  
Old 08-16-2011, 07:38 PM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Frequent, thorough vacuuming (and bag disposal) is a key element in any flea eradication effort.
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  #34  
Old 08-16-2011, 08:48 PM
VOW VOW is offline
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Buy your DE at Wally World, it's with the pool supplies. You can buy enough that will last you ten years. It's great for gardens, too. Won't hurt your hands, but try not to breathe the dust.

Vacuum DAILY, and dispose of the bag or empty the container outside.

You can also try giving your pet brewer's yeast. Some animals love the taste of it, some are picky and you have to stir it well into wet food.

For flea bites on you that are driving you crazy, try LANACANE.


~VOW
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  #35  
Old 06-14-2013, 10:48 AM
soxical soxical is offline
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Quote: VOW (Guest)l "Buy your DE at Wally World, it's with the pool supplies." -- sorry, but nonononono!!!! Never registered to post on these things before but . . . I'm a recent convert to DE (Diatomaceous Earth) FOOD GRADE ONLY (NOT the pool filter variant). DE is utterly harmless, used by the food industry bevause its microscopic glass-like nature gets between exoskelton joints and slices bugs up so effectively so it keeps bugs out of our food but as a result is probably present IN our food, and I even hear from those that add it to their pets' food. Utterly harmless, but not ideal of course to breath in clouds of it, especially if asthmatica! Used not carelessly there should be no issue as it has a very flour-like consistency. Some rub it on their pets - but the insect (flea, in the case) has to crawl into/through it for it to get into its joints, and getting the stuff through the fur onto the skin might prove tricky - and you may lose your face in the attempt if you're dealing with a cat!!! DE (FOOD GRADE) is harmless, non-toxic, astonishingly effective in a 'physical/mechanical' manner, and crazy cheap. I went to a feed/ranch store, "Sorry, we only have small bags left..." . . . it was 10pounds for maybe $15. A little canister of eg Sergeant is about 12 OUNCES for about half that price, and laughably useless.
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  #36  
Old 06-14-2013, 10:56 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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Originally Posted by belladonna View Post
I had fleas in my house last summer, I would treat the dog and within days they'd be all over her again. What ended up working was Borax powder. Sprinkled onto rugs, carpets, inside couch crevices, under furniture, mattresses, etc. Sit for an hour or two, vacuum up the exposed areas (I left it beneath the beds and couches), and repeat about a week later.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbbth View Post
We did something similar. We frontlined the animals, put all the blankets and bedding through the wash on hot water, and got a cheap $4 can of flea powder and dusted every piece of furniture in the house.
Right. You can't just treat the animals. The fleas lay eggs, the eggs fall off the animal onto the floor, carpet, bedding, wherever the animal goes, so even if you manage to eliminate the little bastards on the dog, their progeny are just going to hop back on when the dog walks past and you'll have to start all over.
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  #37  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:02 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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However, I'm not sure how effective any of these techniques will be on zombie fleas...
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  #38  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:05 AM
StJoan StJoan is offline
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To the OP: you need a nit comb, some white vinegar, a bowl wide enough to dip the comb's teeth in, a bowl of water, a towel, and a lot of patience. Basically, the idea is that you run the nit comb through your pet's fur, remove any combings (which you drop in the vinegar bowl) before running it through the coat again. Periodically, you will also have to dip the comb in the vinegar, and then rinse in water, followed by a quick drying. It can be tedious, but my short-haired cats love this "grooming" session, so I actually prefer this to any chemical deflea-ers.
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  #39  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:07 AM
soxical soxical is offline
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Forgive my typos - my cellphone keypad is a little finicky. Personal experience: reading up on DE (FOOD GRADE) before deciding if I should try it, since I'd never heard of it and who wants to hurt their pets (?!!) I read of a guy who conducted an experiment - I decided to, too. We all know fleas can jump as much as six FEET, right? I put a couple spoons of DE (food grade - got to stress that) in a 2qt glass mixing jug, and each time one of the buggers jumped my leg while I was dealing with the bad area I plucked it off, threw it in the jug, and covered it over with a clear glass plate. The effect led me to spread/dust (pretty good dusting) a zone on the wood floor. Six FEET? ONCE I have seen ONE jump one and a half INCHES!! It blew my mind to watch. You drop them in it, they immediately act like they're floundering in quicksand, and when they manage to jump, it's barely an INCH. Time now for me to dust the floor so they get into it themselves instead of me having to throw the blighters in. Am I cruel to enjoy so much watching them struggle so hard? ;-) I hate hate HATE those things. PS every morning whatever I added to the jug that orevious evening is dead. Yes, it disables but then also kills them. Slices their little bodies to crap. It's so good against ANYTHING exoskeletal that they warn to NOT use it out in the yard because there are so many good bugs around that combat many of the bad ones - the entire ecosystem would be thrown out of whack. *** DE (FOOD GRADE) -- BUY IT !!!! ***
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  #40  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:11 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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Originally Posted by soxical View Post
Am I cruel to enjoy so much watching them struggle so hard? ;-) I hate hate HATE those things.
Nah. When I would catch one I liked to drop them in a glass of water and watch them drown. Fuck 'em; they deserve a painful death.
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  #41  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:27 AM
soxical soxical is offline
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With you there, DCnDC! Before DE (food version - just in case someone didn't read the above) I would do the water thing. Fiance splits them between her nails but (a) I'm crap at that and (b) I usually drop them or they hop out. Difference is that they'll swim around in the water happily for days, and hop out if they get ANY traction, like once the water evaporates down a little in the Texas heat and leaves something on the glass's side they can grab to. In DE there's no hopping out cus they can only hop maybe an inch, and they're dead in hours. And during that time instead of watching them having nice 'pool time', I get to watch them dragging their tiny little ba@#%rd selves around like they're crippled. :-)
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  #42  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:35 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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Originally Posted by soxical View Post
Difference is that they'll swim around in the water happily for days, and hop out if they get ANY traction, like once the water evaporates down a little in the Texas heat and leaves something on the glass's side they can grab to.
Yeah you have to kind of poke at them to keep them underwater, and then they drown in about 30 seconds.
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  #43  
Old 06-14-2013, 11:45 AM
soxical soxical is offline
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CDnDC - oh! Something new every day!! <<http://www.richsoil.com/diatomaceous-earth.jsp>>. Completely non-toxic.Non-pesticidal. Impervious to tolerance-building as it's a physical killing. For the poster above that didn't want toxic answers.
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  #44  
Old 06-14-2013, 03:26 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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There's a life cycle involved, which means that, while you may have killed adults with your initial application of Frontline, you probably didn't get the eggs... which hatched 2-3 weeks later, giving you a fresh new crop of fleas to contend with.

I recommend a shotgun approach and find you have to continue doing these things pretty much about once a month during the entire flea season.

•First, treat all pets in the house. Frontline, Advantage, Comfortis, Capstar, Trifexis, whathaveyou. Get a recommendation from your vet. (I use Trifexis for fleas and heartworms.) At the same time...

•Run all the pet bedding and anywhere they sleep through the washer in super hot water. I add Borax to any pet laundry because it kills fleas dead.

• Vacuum daily. Again, Borax to the rescue: I sprinkle it liberally on any rug, couch, or cushion that cannot be run through a washer. On the main rug, I get the dog to walk around a bit to rub the Borax into the carpet, then vacuum up.

•Dissolve some Borax in hot water and wash down anything that couldn't be cleaned with the previous two steps. I use a Borax solution to mop my floors because also, cockroaches don't like it. Kills them too. It's also harmless to the critters if they are floor lickers like mine are.

•Maybe use a bottle of Frontline spray on any fabric in any room where the animals might be.

•Call a pest control company and have them spray outside, all around your house, but especially in any grassy areas where your pets hang out. You could probably also find some sort of bug killer at a home supply store and spray your yard yourself.

•Use a flea comb or a nit comb and go over the critters every day. Be sure to kill anything you get out. I use a dish soap and water solution, but I see upthread vinegar solution would work, as would, I imagine, a Borax solution.

•If you have a really bad problem, (I did this once -- ugh), in a darkened room, shine a light on a bowl of soapy water. For some reason, the fleas are attracted to the light, jump into the bowl, drown and die.

•When you are through vacuuming, make sure you empty the vacuum cleaner carefully -- you don't want unhatched eggs hatching inside your vacuum cleaner.

If I think of anything else, I'll come back to post.

Last edited by Dogzilla; 06-14-2013 at 03:27 PM..
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  #45  
Old 09-05-2013, 02:23 PM
Photon.engineer Photon.engineer is offline
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It's really a complicated issue

Interesting topic we all have to contend with. I've read hundreds of posts on dozens of sites on flea infestations, on whether or not Frontline/Advantage are working and fleas becoming immune to these products. I don't see any substantiated evidence to confirm this to date. There's a lot going on in the bigger scheme of things, that causes people to jump to conclusions without any empirical data to show causality. Generally, flea infestations are functionally multiple generations being at different points in the life cycle (adults, freshly laid eggs, newly hatched eggs, repeat).

If the pet was treated, a spray containing the anti-growth hormone (my preference, used inside, and of course intense vacuuming and washing of textile products), the only possible vector of new contamination comes from outdoors--something you have almost no control over. Frustratingly, upon the sight of an adult flea, most people will conclude 'the Frontline is not working' or similar. Short of spraying the immediate outdoor environment (after all, that's where the fleas came from in the first place), the pet will continue to bring in new adult fleas with every outing. I personally have an opposition to this scorched earth policy of dousing the backyard with a neurotoxin who's long term effects are unknown, with the killing of beneficial insects, and worry about the toxic after effects on my kids when they play in the grass and dirt. I look forward to the onslaught of winter's colder temperatures and a natural lowering of the flea population. Until then, I'll continue to fight the battle.
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  #46  
Old 09-05-2013, 03:20 PM
chronometer chronometer is online now
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Is it possible to fleabomb the house? The residual insecticide should work for around three months, preventing new generations of fleas from hatching in the first place.
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  #47  
Old 09-05-2013, 06:59 PM
phall0106 phall0106 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chronometer View Post
Is it possible to fleabomb the house? The residual insecticide should work for around three months, preventing new generations of fleas from hatching in the first place.
This is exactly what I've done in the past when fleas were bad. Treat the cats (Advantage is my preference), get the cats out, close everything up tights and bomb every single room (even the basement and attic--I'm not taking any chances!). Come home and air out the house and vacuum every where, including furniture. Dispose of the vacuum bag outside immediately.

This usually takes care of any flea problems. However, don't wait until a house is infested--that just makes it harder to get rid of them.
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  #48  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:19 PM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is offline
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Location: Torrance Ca
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I had a horrible flea infestation because all me neighbors had outside dogs and didn't seem to do anything to control them. I used boric acid on my carpet and was done with fleas completely. I had 4 large dogs at that time. I sprinkled all over the carpet, swept it in and did not vacuum for a week.
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  #49  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:33 PM
listedmia listedmia is offline
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Wow, I'm amazed nobody has mentioned Comfortis. It's a pill that makes them poisonous to fleas for at LEAST a month. It's kind of a pain in the ass to get them to take it because it smells and tastes terrible, but it gets the job done.

Unfortunately, my local pet store stopped selling it over the counter. I switched to Advantage, but it works for two weeks at the absolute most. They're due for a vet visit soon so we'll get some more then.
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  #50  
Old 09-06-2013, 04:01 AM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is offline
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listedmia, the vet should be able to get you Comfortis, if that is what you want. Or at least a prescription for one, so that you don't have to use Advantage instead.
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