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  #1  
Old 08-17-2011, 12:43 PM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
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Employer requires Social Security card?

I've just started work for Aramark, whose policy apparently REQUIRES my SS card. I've followed official instructions before for every other job, which state that using just my passport is fine. I have no idea where my card is, and haven't in years, but they insist (and it's even printed on a sheet of paper stuck down in my paperwork) that they must have it for SS verification. And it has to be the original. And I'm fired if I don't show it within 30 days. If pressed, I assume I'd order a new one. But is this OK?
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  #2  
Old 08-17-2011, 12:53 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
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I have run into this situation with employers as well. They are wrong; a passport is sufficient for your legality to work, and last year's tax return or other correspondence from the IRS should be sufficient to prove that the number you gave = you. I don't know what an employer is required to do these days with regard to the validity of SSNs; I assume they must verify with the IRS that the number is valid, but I don't think they have to see the card itself.

In practical terms, however, it is probably much easier to replace your Social Security card than to convince them of that.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:03 PM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
I have run into this situation with employers as well. They are wrong; a passport is sufficient for your legality to work, and last year's tax return or other correspondence from the IRS should be sufficient to prove that the number you gave = you. I don't know what an employer is required to do these days with regard to the validity of SSNs; I assume they must verify with the IRS that the number is valid, but I don't think they have to see the card itself.

In practical terms, however, it is probably much easier to replace your Social Security card than to convince them of that.
I think this is right (IANAL, especially not an employment or immigration L). I am a US Citizen and have used my US Passport as proof of employment eligibility, as well as a combination of a state driver's license (which doesn't establish eligibility in and of itself because you don't need authorization to work in the US to get a DL) and a territorial birth certificate.
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  #4  
Old 08-17-2011, 01:12 PM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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This might be an internal policy of your employer, but I remember seeing the list from HR on what is required and a passport was permitted.

Like the OP, I have no idea where my SS card is. It wasn't laminated and probably fell apart a couple of decades ago. I've never needed it as long as I know the number.
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  #5  
Old 08-17-2011, 01:16 PM
Simplicio Simplicio is offline
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Seems kinda silly. Of all the various gov't IDs I have, the SS card seems like it would be the easiest to forge. Its on cheap paper and doesn't seem to have much in the way of counterfeit protection at all. Especially compared to a US passport, which is coated in watermarks, micro-writing, etc.
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  #6  
Old 08-17-2011, 01:23 PM
anson2995 anson2995 is offline
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The IRS requires employers to check your social security card (bolding mine):

Quote:
You are required to get each employee's name and Social Security Number (SSN) and to enter them on Form W-2. (This requirement also applies to resident and nonresident alien employees.) You should ask your employee to show you his or her social security card. The employee may show the card if it is available. You may, but are not required to, photocopy the social security card if the employee provides it. Record each new employee's name and social security number from his or her social security card. Any employee without a social security card should apply for one using Form SS-5, Application for Social Security Card (PDF).
The Social Security Administration says that's not necessary if you use their verification service to make sure your name and SSN match and are valid.

Last edited by anson2995; 08-17-2011 at 01:27 PM.. Reason: added 2nd link
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  #7  
Old 08-17-2011, 01:26 PM
Simplicio Simplicio is offline
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Originally Posted by anson2995 View Post
Is that a requirement to show the card? They way its worded makes it sound optional: "You should ask"....."may show card if its available".... "if the employee provides it".

Compare the language for actually entering the SSN on the W-2, where they actually use the word "required"
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  #8  
Old 08-17-2011, 01:44 PM
Omar Little Omar Little is offline
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Even if the government doesn't require businesses to see an actual social security card, an employer can require its employees to present an actual social security card to be employed. Not having an actual social security isn't a protected class. Employers can have all kinds of conditions of employment as long as they aren't discriminatory. If your employer says "show me your social security card or pack up your things, then you better get your ass down to the Social Security Administration office and apply for a replacement card, ASAP, if you want to keep your job.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:48 PM
postcards postcards is offline
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You are required to get each employee's name and Social Security Number (SSN) and to enter them on Form W-2. (This requirement also applies to resident and nonresident alien employees.) You should ask your employee to show you his or her social security card. The employee may show the card if it is available. You may, but are not required to, photocopy the social security card if the employee provides it. Record each new employee's name and social security number from his or her social security card. Any employee without a social security card should apply for one using Form SS-5, Application for Social Security Card (PDF). The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers social security number (SSN) verification and quick access to relevant forms and publications.
What I italicized doesn't read like any requirement I've ever seen.

The employer is only required by the IRS to obtain the number, from how I read this.
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  #10  
Old 08-17-2011, 02:00 PM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
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USCIS does NOT require employees to present Social Security cards to complete I-9 forms, and in fact, requiring specific documents rather than telling employees they can present a document from Column A or one each from Column B and Column C has frequently been held to be discriminatory. More info in the Employer Handbook at the bottom of p. 3, among other places.

Not having a Social Security card can mean many things, not the least of which is that all kinds of people who are legally authorized to work in the U.S. don't necessarily get Social Security cards immediately - including recently arrived permanent residents, asylees, refugees, and people on work visas. They are still legally authorized to work in the U.S.

More info on unlawful discrimination can be found elsewhere on the USCIS website.

Eva Luna, Immigration Paralegal and former I-9 advice person for Fortune 100 financial institution

Last edited by Eva Luna; 08-17-2011 at 02:03 PM..
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  #11  
Old 08-17-2011, 02:01 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
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Simply requiring a card is an easy way for the company to comply with minimum federal regulations with minimal thinking on the part of its employees.

When I have had issues in the past, it has been for precisely this reason: they learn the formula "driver's license + Soc. Sec. card," which means they never think about the reasons behind this requirement. By giving a passport and an SSN, you are asking someone to combine critical thinking with bureaucracy, something < 100% of hiring prrsonnel are willing (or able) to do.
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  #12  
Old 08-17-2011, 02:25 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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Okay, let's think this one through, shall we?

The Social Security card is issued to you to track your income across jobs throughout your career. This is done in order to determine how much retirement money you get after you retire. If you paid into Social Security by working for X number of years, then you are eligible to claim Y dollars at the appropriate retirement age. So the Social Security system is based on employment. Why else would you have a Social Security card, if not to give your employers an "account number" of sorts?

Sort of blows my mind that anyone would question this. Of course it's okay for an employer to require a SS card; that's what the damn things are for! For what other purpose do you have a SS card?
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  #13  
Old 08-17-2011, 02:34 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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Originally Posted by Dr. Drake View Post
hiring prrsonnel
Like Catbert?
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  #14  
Old 08-17-2011, 02:48 PM
Dr. Drake Dr. Drake is offline
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Originally Posted by Dogzilla View Post
Sort of blows my mind that anyone would question this. Of course it's okay for an employer to require a SS card; that's what the damn things are for! For what other purpose do you have a SS card?
The number is important. The card the number is printed on it secondary.

KneadtoKnow: heh. Good one.
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  #15  
Old 08-17-2011, 02:56 PM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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Yeah, no one here is questioning the requirement to provide the SSN to your employer, but the card is printed on paper with no picture.
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Old 08-17-2011, 03:15 PM
LouisB LouisB is offline
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I've run into this requirement only once in my life. I had my original SS card (issued in 1954) laminated right after I got it and have carried it in my wallet ever since. The look I got from the HR jerk who demanded it was priceless. The look I gave him was less so.
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  #17  
Old 08-17-2011, 03:21 PM
Dallas Jones Dallas Jones is offline
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I worked at a job for 30 years and then went back into the job market. So I thought that I should get an upgraded SS card. Turns out that what you get after all the verification is the same little printed piece of cardboard that I got when I was 16 years old.

I then found my original with my signature from when I was a kid. But both cards are from the same shitty little cardboard type stock.

And I had to show the thing so it could be photo copied with my driver's license.
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Old 08-17-2011, 03:40 PM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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My social security card says right on it, "Not to be used for identification." I will provide the number to those who have a need for it (i.e., anyone giving me money), but nobody has ever pushed me to show them the card itself when I point out that it is NOT a piece of I.D.
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  #19  
Old 08-17-2011, 03:49 PM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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Originally Posted by madmonk28 View Post
Yeah, no one here is questioning the requirement to provide the SSN to your employer, but the card is printed on paper with no picture.
See, I thought the OP was questioning exactly that, when he/she said
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticbear
But is this OK?
Since when do your employers just take your word for it (the number)?

SS cards are not ID cards. That's why the passport can be used as ID, but it cannot be used by employers to verify that the employee remembers his or her SS number correctly. They might be legally allowed to accept it and just take your word for it, but if I were an employer, I wouldn't.

Last edited by Dogzilla; 08-17-2011 at 03:52 PM..
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  #20  
Old 08-17-2011, 04:02 PM
septimus septimus is offline
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I've not seen my SS card for 40 years. I'd better get a replacement soon as it's almost time to get benefits and I think I will need it for that!

I was asked for a SS card when applying for a Nevada Driver's License. Paystub, W2, or photocopy of 1040 Form with the SS number was OK, but I didn't have any of those either. I got a blank 1040 from the post office, filled it out randomly, photocopied it, and scrunched it a bit to look old, then got my Driver's License.
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Old 08-17-2011, 04:03 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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To me, the requirement to see the SS card itself is not so much about identification (proving you are who you say you are), it's about verification (proving your SSN is what you say it is).

Last edited by KneadToKnow; 08-17-2011 at 04:03 PM..
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  #22  
Old 08-17-2011, 04:54 PM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogzilla View Post
See, I thought the OP was questioning exactly that, when he/she said

Since when do your employers just take your word for it (the number)?

SS cards are not ID cards. That's why the passport can be used as ID, but it cannot be used by employers to verify that the employee remembers his or her SS number correctly. They might be legally allowed to accept it and just take your word for it, but if I were an employer, I wouldn't.
I don't think I've ever, once, had to show my actual SS card for employment. Or possibly even a Federal security clearance (although in that case I’m sure they checked it out against the SSA database along with the other half-billion things they checked out about me). Even when the HR manager at my first immigration law firm job told me to bring in my driver’s license and Social Security card to fill out the I-9 (which is an unlawful overdocumentation request, by the way, and she got chewed out for it later), I knew it was just shorthand for “bring I-9 documents” and brought my U.S. passport instead.
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  #23  
Old 08-18-2011, 04:24 PM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
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Possible conclusion!

I brought my paperwork today and handed over my passport. He did come out of the office at some point and request my driver's license, and I said "well, the passport is a "List A" document, so you shouldn't need it", ::reaches for wallet::, he said that he had to have two forms, so I gave him my DL anyway and explained to him how that form works. He said he's never had anyone use a passport as ID before.

Not a word breathed about the SS card, so I don't plan on ever bringing it up. We'll see if I get my paycheck Monday
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:35 PM
Omar Little Omar Little is offline
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Originally Posted by chaoticbear View Post
Possible conclusion!

I brought my paperwork today and handed over my passport. He did come out of the office at some point and request my driver's license, and I said "well, the passport is a "List A" document, so you shouldn't need it", ::reaches for wallet::, he said that he had to have two forms, so I gave him my DL anyway and explained to him how that form works. He said he's never had anyone use a passport as ID before.

Not a word breathed about the SS card, so I don't plan on ever bringing it up. We'll see if I get my paycheck Monday
As someone said above, sounds like you got an internal form checker and not someone really thinking for himself. Hope it works out.
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Old 08-18-2011, 08:13 PM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
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Ah. He did give me my entire file to take home and fill out, including a blank job application (which I ignored), since I had used a resume in the first place. I just had been concerned about the specificity of that sheet of paper in there. But that makes sense that it could have been for him to look at.
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  #26  
Old 08-18-2011, 08:38 PM
Manda JO Manda JO is offline
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The actual process of replacing a social security card is really pretty painless. There is an office near me, so I just went on line, filled out the forms, printed them, and took them down. There wasn't much of a line and it took all of 10 minutes. New card came in the mail a few weeks later.
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Old 08-25-2011, 12:13 PM
sunacres sunacres is offline
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Originally Posted by Manda JO View Post
The actual process of replacing a social security card is really pretty painless. There is an office near me, so I just went on line, filled out the forms, printed them, and took them down. There wasn't much of a line and it took all of 10 minutes. New card came in the mail a few weeks later.
I just did the same, though the "few weeks" issue could bite me since my new employer says all required documentation is due today.

I want to salute the Dope for having such a timely discussion of this issue. I logged in this morning for the first time in a few weeks specifically to search for "social security card," because for the first time in all of my 55 years an employer wants to see the actual card. I've kept it in a folder and actually saw it at some point in the last couple of years, but I've moved a few times recently and can't lay my hands on it.

From the discussion here my conclusion is that the HR organization that's hiring me is "special," and not in a good way.
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  #28  
Old 08-25-2011, 02:04 PM
svd678 svd678 is offline
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If you become injured, ill, or elderly you will be asked for your SS card regularly and frequently, so keep it where you can find it. (I never needed it for employment.)
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  #29  
Old 08-25-2011, 06:52 PM
AndyLee AndyLee is offline
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Originally Posted by Gary "Wombat" Robson View Post
My social security card says right on it, "Not to be used for identification." I will provide the number to those who have a need for it (i.e., anyone giving me money), but nobody has ever pushed me to show them the card itself when I point out that it is NOT a piece of I.D.
The card is not to be used for identification. The number is used for ID

There's a difference.

This was my last day at work so I asked out H/R person about this thread as I was doing my final papers, she said, she never heard of anything like that. She said when filling your I-9 the employer is forbidden to ask for specific documents from the list. You can provide any choose.

But I googled around and it seems a lot of jobs specifically ask for the card itself, but those jobs all seem to be related to schools and government agencies.

I know the government often makes laws forbidding something to private industry while exempting themselves.
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  #30  
Old 08-26-2011, 01:41 PM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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If you become injured, ill, or elderly you will be asked for your SS card regularly and frequently, so keep it where you can find it. (I never needed it for employment.)
Not so. I have been through cancer treatments (twice), numerous assorted injuries, and an unrelated hospitalization, and never been asked for my Social Security card. In fact, I've never been asked for it at all, and I'm 53 years old.

As AndyLee and I have both pointed out, the number is used for ID. The card, no.
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  #31  
Old 08-26-2011, 02:08 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by Dogzilla View Post

Sort of blows my mind that anyone would question this. Of course it's okay for an employer to require a SS card; that's what the damn things are for! For what other purpose do you have a SS card?
Honestly, I don't know. I'm not even sure I've even seen my Social Security card.
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  #32  
Old 08-27-2011, 12:29 AM
chaoticbear chaoticbear is offline
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My life ended up requiring a trip to the SSA office anyway - my SS# failed to verify in whatever online verification system they use, so I got to take a letter down there to investigate.

Turns out the inept manager had reversed my first and last names when submitting the request.

Weird other happening, though: the SSA guy was asking me some identity verification questions, and I didn't know my father's name. Turns out, he was able to just tell me. Mom never did, for some reason.

--chaoticbear, bastard child
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  #33  
Old 08-27-2011, 12:52 AM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is online now
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Originally Posted by Eva Luna View Post
USCIS does NOT require employees to present Social Security cards to complete I-9 forms, and in fact, requiring specific documents rather than telling employees they can present a document from Column A or one each from Column B and Column C has frequently been held to be discriminatory. More info in the Employer Handbook at the bottom of p. 3, among other places.

Not having a Social Security card can mean many things, not the least of which is that all kinds of people who are legally authorized to work in the U.S. don't necessarily get Social Security cards immediately - including recently arrived permanent residents, asylees, refugees, and people on work visas. They are still legally authorized to work in the U.S.

More info on unlawful discrimination can be found elsewhere on the USCIS website.

Eva Luna, Immigration Paralegal and former I-9 advice person for Fortune 100 financial institution
Did anyone else actually read what Eva Luna said? The I-9 form (the one your employer is filling out when they ask for your SSN) clearly states that requiring to see an employee's Social Security card is illegal.
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  #34  
Old 08-27-2011, 09:46 AM
sunacres sunacres is offline
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Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post
Did anyone else actually read what Eva Luna said? The I-9 form (the one your employer is filling out when they ask for your SSN) clearly states that requiring to see an employee's Social Security card is illegal.
Are you sure? The text on the form says "Employers CANNOT specify which document(s) they will accept from an employee." But isn't that referring exclusively to supporting documentation for the I-9?

Surely it doesn't mean that in general, employers can't require documentation of other things for other purposes.

My employer's requirement to see the card isn't in conjunction with the I-9. It's stupid, but independently so.
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Old 08-27-2011, 10:16 AM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is online now
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Are you sure? The text on the form says "Employers CANNOT specify which document(s) they will accept from an employee." But isn't that referring exclusively to supporting documentation for the I-9?

Surely it doesn't mean that in general, employers can't require documentation of other things for other purposes.

My employer's requirement to see the card isn't in conjunction with the I-9. It's stupid, but independently so.
IANAL, nor am I an expert, as Eva Luna apparently is. But I understand from the I-9 and Eva's post that asking for the Social Security card isn't a criminal act, but rather one that opens them up to a lawsuit by an individual or a government agency for acting in a discriminatory manner against a protected class (in this clase legal residents with the right to work but who are not US citizens and who don't have a Social Security card). Since chaoticbear doesn't appear to be a member of the protected class, I don't know if he could sue personally, but a government agency certainly could.

Again, IANAL, but I understand that for other types of discrimination, asking for an employee's marital status or religion isn't illegal, per se, but it puts the company in the position of basically having to prove that they were asking for a non-discriminatory reason. (I'm not sure whether there's an actual rebuttable presumption of discrimination, but in practical terms, that's what the company faces if they do something that looks obviously discriminatory.)

In other words, while it is possible that your or chaoticbear's employer could prevail in court, a call to the EEOC or ACLU by someone with evidence that the employer requires a Social Security card could easily lead to a very unpleasant and expensive situation for the company. And it's hard to imagine what defense they would use, since they told chaoticbear he'd be fired if he didn't produce a card. How is that not discriminatory against those who can't get a card but are entitled to work?
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  #36  
Old 08-27-2011, 10:41 AM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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If you take a look at the actual form (PDF here), here's what it's saying:

The Social Security card is an acceptable "document that establishes employment authorization" (List C, last page). A job applicant may present a SS card or any of the other 7 equivalent documents along with a "document which establishes identity" (List B). Alternatively, an applicant may provide a document from List A and not have to worry about lists B and C at all.

What the employer CANNOT do is specify which documents are acceptable. If you show up with a U.S. Passport, for example, the employer may not ask for a social security card.
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  #37  
Old 08-27-2011, 10:50 AM
Kolak of Twilo Kolak of Twilo is online now
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Originally Posted by chaoticbear View Post
Possible conclusion!

I brought my paperwork today and handed over my passport. He did come out of the office at some point and request my driver's license, and I said "well, the passport is a "List A" document, so you shouldn't need it", ::reaches for wallet::, he said that he had to have two forms, so I gave him my DL anyway and explained to him how that form works. He said he's never had anyone use a passport as ID before.
It sounds to me your manager/HR person is an idiot. The I-9 makes is abundantly clear to anyone who can be bothered to read AND comprehend that anyone presenting any 1 of the documents in List A is eligible for employment in the U.S. of A.

As someone who has had to fill out hundreds of I-9's I always appreciate the people who give me a passport or something else from List A because it saves time and simplifies things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post
IANAL, nor am I an expert, as Eva Luna apparently is.
Eva Luna does indeed have the facts correct and is the resident expert in this area.

Last edited by Kolak of Twilo; 08-27-2011 at 10:51 AM..
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  #38  
Old 08-27-2011, 11:14 AM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is online now
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Originally Posted by Kolak of Twilo View Post
Eva Luna does indeed have the facts correct and is the resident expert in this area.
Nothing annoys me more than seeing someone who obviously knows what they're talking about post the answer to a question (with supporting cites in this case!) and then be completely ignored and contradicted by people making WAGs and blatant assumptions. Except maybe the very rare occasion when *I'm* the one who knows what he's talking about and I still get ignored!

And global warming.
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  #39  
Old 08-27-2011, 12:50 PM
Cliffy Cliffy is offline
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Originally Posted by Omar Little View Post
Even if the government doesn't require businesses to see an actual social security card, an employer can require its employees to present an actual social security card to be employed.
Cite?

--Cliffy
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  #40  
Old 08-27-2011, 03:13 PM
pohjonen pohjonen is offline
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Originally Posted by septimus View Post
I've not seen my SS card for 40 years. I'd better get a replacement soon as it's almost time to get benefits and I think I will need it for that!

I was asked for a SS card when applying for a Nevada Driver's License. Paystub, W2, or photocopy of 1040 Form with the SS number was OK, but I didn't have any of those either. I got a blank 1040 from the post office, filled it out randomly, photocopied it, and scrunched it a bit to look old, then got my Driver's License.
Actually, you don't need the card to apply for SS. I just did it a few months back, all handled online and with a phone call from SS. They even obtained my birth certificate electronically, so I didn't have to provide it. Piece of cake.
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  #41  
Old 08-27-2011, 06:05 PM
The Man In Black The Man In Black is offline
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Cite?

--Cliffy

In an "at will" state, I'd think they can require anything they wish. And you are free to decline, and find work elsewhere.
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  #42  
Old 08-29-2011, 10:43 AM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
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Originally Posted by The Man In Black View Post
In an "at will" state, I'd think they can require anything they wish. And you are free to decline, and find work elsewhere.
And the Department of Justice is free to sue you for violating Federal law. Here's but one of the many, many examples in which a company was held financially liable for requiring employees to present documentation beyond that required by law. I see press releases like this on approximately a weekly basis, and I'm sure the DOJ doesn't report every single one.
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  #43  
Old 08-29-2011, 01:05 PM
shiftless shiftless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by septimus View Post
I've not seen my SS card for 40 years. I'd better get a replacement soon as it's almost time to get benefits and I think I will need it for that!
Me too. I lost mine in the great wallet disaster of 1974 when I forgot to take my wallet out of my pants pocket before putting them in the laundry bin.

Just the other day my mom (age 87) showed me her SS card. She claims it is a necessary form of ID and she carries it everywhere. She does not get SS, BTW.
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  #44  
Old 08-29-2011, 11:23 PM
Cliffy Cliffy is offline
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What Eva said.

Here is an actual web page from the DoJ which states:

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.S. Department of Justice
Employers may not request more or different documents than are required to verify employment eligibility, reject reasonably genuine-looking documents, or specify certain documents over others with the purpose or intent of discriminating on the basis of citizenship status or national origin. U.S. citizens and all work authorized individuals are protected from document abuse.
[Emphasis mine.]

As you can see in the quote, it's only a civil rights violation if they're doing it in order to discriminate, but I'd hate to have to fight that one in court.

--Cliffy
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Old 08-30-2011, 12:37 AM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shiftless View Post
Me too. I lost mine in the great wallet disaster of 1974 when I forgot to take my wallet out of my pants pocket before putting them in the laundry bin.

Just the other day my mom (age 87) showed me her SS card. She claims it is a necessary form of ID and she carries it everywhere. She does not get SS, BTW.
At some point in time you will NEED one, so get it NOW, rather than later.
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Old 08-30-2011, 09:25 AM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
At some point in time you will NEED one, so get it NOW, rather than later.
Why do you think this? We've already established in the thread that if you have an approved ID--such as a passport--employers can't ask for the card, and as I mentioned early on, my card says right on it that it isn't to be used for ID.

If you have the number, you really don't need the card.
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Old 08-30-2011, 02:13 PM
shiftless shiftless is offline
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Originally Posted by DrDeth View Post
At some point in time you will NEED one, so get it NOW, rather than later.
Its a little paper card with a number on it. I seem to remember anyway, it's been almost 40 years since I had one. Even if I kept it I would have disentigrated by now. You are not the first person to tell me that I NEED one but nobody can tell me when situation that would be.

Last edited by shiftless; 08-30-2011 at 02:13 PM..
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  #48  
Old 08-30-2011, 04:57 PM
Icarus Icarus is offline
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PEOPLE! PEOPLE! PEOPLE!

Stop,.......just stop!

When one is hired (in the US) there are a number of parts to the process, here are just 2 of them:
  • I-9 - Eligibility to work, requires any of a number of documents, can be SS card + Drivers Licence OR can be Passport only.
  • Payroll - Needs correct SS number and Name as it appears on SS card. Best way to get this is look at the physical SS card. Employers who do not get correct SS number and Name as it appears on SS card, and report incorrect SS number or name are liable for some fines when filing taxes at the end of the year.

You may now return to your regularly scheduled confusion and misplaced outrage.
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Old 08-30-2011, 04:59 PM
Icarus Icarus is offline
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Oh, and as for the "can not be used for ID" on the SS card - that means for everyone else, other than your Payroll. Payroll is what it exists for in the first place.
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  #50  
Old 08-30-2011, 10:15 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary "Wombat" Robson View Post
Why do you think this? We've already established in the thread that if you have an approved ID--such as a passport--employers can't ask for the card, and as I mentioned early on, my card says right on it that it isn't to be used for ID.

If you have the number, you really don't need the card.
Other than for the Government itself, which has required a copy from me.

The Feds and variosu states require it:
http://www.dmv.ca.gov/dl/dl_info.htm#SSN
The only documents acceptable for SSN verification are originals of the following:

Social Security Card (cannot be laminated)
Medicare card
U.S. Armed Forces Identification Cards:
Active-DD 2
Retired-DD 2
Reserved-DD 2
Dependent-DD 173
Military separation document-DD 214


Never having been in the Military or on Medicare, I thus needed to show a SocSec card.

Not to mention that message is obsolete, newer cards no longer have it,

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/07/26/we...t-kidding.html

wiki"Social Security cards up until the 1980s expressly stated the number and card were not to be used for identification purposes. Since nearly everyone in the United States now has a number, it became convenient to use it anyway and the message was removed."

shiftless, etc

Yes, technically, there are many other forms of ID other than a SocSec card. But you are applying for a job, which presumably you want. Thus if a somewhat clueless HR drone sez they need to see a SocSec card, you are not going to win any friends (or the job) by getting all huffy and insisting on other ID's. A lawsuit isn;t a real good option either.

Just get the card. It's free. And, not having it could cost you a job when the other applicant has one and you don't.

And of course there are jobs where you need to be a US Citizen.

Last edited by DrDeth; 08-30-2011 at 10:17 PM..
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