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  #1  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:18 AM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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How to get rid of ground-nesting yellowjackets? Need answer sorta fast...

Today's tale of woe here. Post #135.

Obviously, I'm now faced with task of eradicating a yellowjacket nest. I've read some different reports online, each saying something completely different. Some say soap and water. Some say poison (each website I've seen has different ideas for what poison works best). Some claim that simply smothering the nest with a wheelbarrow of dirt is best.

Any dopers out there have experience dealing with these types of nests? All info is much appreciated. I really don't want to go to the hospital again.

Thanks.

Last edited by Lancia; 09-05-2011 at 01:20 AM..
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  #2  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:11 AM
Dereknocue67 Dereknocue67 is offline
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I had a nest in my front yard and emptied about 25% of a spray can of wasp killer into it and then covered the hole with a brick. I thought that would do it but a week later, they were still active. I then used an entire can of the same off the shelf wasp killer and that did the trick.
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  #3  
Old 09-05-2011, 05:39 AM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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  #4  
Old 09-05-2011, 05:43 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Are you allowed to kill yellowjackets in your jurisdiction? Some places, they are protected*, so you must first call the society to safely remove them to someplace else if they are a current danger to you; if they are in a remote corner of the garden, you may be asked to just stay away from them.

* Because with the Bees dying from CCD and other problems, yellowjackets and other insects are necessary to take over their duties, so protecting them does make sense.
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Old 09-05-2011, 05:45 AM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
Are you allowed to kill yellowjackets in your jurisdiction? Some places, they are protected*, so you must first call the society to safely remove them to someplace else if they are a current danger to you; if they are in a remote corner of the garden, you may be asked to just stay away from them.

* Because with the Bees dying from CCD and other problems, yellowjackets and other insects are necessary to take over their duties, so protecting them does make sense.
Rubbish!

Yellowjackets do not pollinate!

They hunt other creatures for food.
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  #6  
Old 09-05-2011, 05:53 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
Yellowjackets do not pollinate!

They hunt other creatures for food.
Gee, no need to shout. Unless the OP is a proper entymologist, I doubt that it is a specific yellowjacket species as compared to "bigger than a bee, smaller than a hummingbee, striped yellow-black and stings" which could be any one of a dozen species, some pollinating, some hunting.

Which is why in some areas you are required to call the experts, who can then deal with the species the appropriate way.
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Old 09-05-2011, 06:32 AM
Zany Zeolite Zipper Zany Zeolite Zipper is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
Gee, no need to shout. Unless the OP is a proper entymologist, I doubt that it is a specific yellowjacket species as compared to "bigger than a bee, smaller than a hummingbee, striped yellow-black and stings" which could be any one of a dozen species, some pollinating, some hunting.

Which is why in some areas you are required to call the experts, who can then deal with the species the appropriate way.
How very German of you.

Fritz: I have miserable stinging insects in my yard.
Hans: Call a Competent Miserable Insects Expert.

I have a vision of a Jaeger with a long green cape and a hat with a feather stocking through your shrubbery.
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  #8  
Old 09-05-2011, 06:47 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Yeah, nuking every living thing from orbit is so much better.
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Old 09-05-2011, 08:21 AM
Xema Xema is offline
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I had the same problem last year. I was quite happy to coexist with the yellowjackets, but the nest was about 15' from my door and they would occasionally sting me for no good reason.

I was about to undertake research to figure out how best to get rid of them, when it was done for me: a skunk dug up and destroyed the nest - presumably as food.

I realize this isn't likely to be much help.
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  #10  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:29 AM
chela chela is offline
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Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
Rubbish!

Yellowjackets do not pollinate!

They hunt other creatures for food.
No and yes. They may not be the bast pollinators but they do accomplish it, and they most certainly do go after nectar.

Skunks took care of my yj nest in a compost heap.

Mostly I would leave them alone at this late date, soon to be killed off by frost. Or work at night and cover/block the entries to the nest.
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  #11  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:35 AM
EarlyMan EarlyMan is offline
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Gasoline - 100% effective IMMEDIATELY

And there's no need to ignite it, either. I know there are those who will cite pollution issues, but check out the ingredients on the bug killer labels. You'll find they're just as bad.

EarlyMan
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  #12  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:47 AM
JBDivmstr JBDivmstr is offline
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And there's no need to ignite it, either. I know there are those who will cite pollution issues, but check out the ingredients on the bug killer labels. You'll find they're just as bad.

EarlyMan
Seconded! And it doesn't take very much, either. A cup full should do the trick nicely.
I would suggest that you have a shovel full of dirt ready to cover the hole, after you pour in the gas.
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  #13  
Old 09-05-2011, 09:37 AM
Cheshire Human Cheshire Human is offline
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I don't know what they are called, but I get these smoke bomb things from my hardware store that are basically gunpowder (only made weaker and with sodium nitrate, instead of potassium), that are intended for moles, chipmunks, etc. My mother had some ground-bees in her garden that were stinging her. I got one of those out.

You light them, shove them in the hole, plop a shovelful of dirt over the whole thing and that's it. In this case, run like hell. They usually have more than one hole, and they swarm. I got stung. The whole forearm still itches, three weeks later.

The good thing is that the toxic smoke it produces rapidly weathers into chemicals that are actually good for the plants. They thrive afterward in soil that had the treatment. No pollution issues.

Last edited by Cheshire Human; 09-05-2011 at 09:37 AM..
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  #14  
Old 09-05-2011, 09:51 AM
Koxinga Koxinga is offline
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I didn't know yellowjackets burrowed in the ground, but it makes sense that they'd want to be that much closer to their lord and master in Hell. No mercy for those bastages.

OTOH, solitary mud daubers bumbling around are your mellow natured, spider eating friends: leave them be.
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Old 09-05-2011, 10:05 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is online now
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Yellowjackets get no sympathy from me. They are the only member of the bee tribe I know of that are aggressive and go looking for trouble, rather than just stinging you when directly threatened.

I recently took out a small wasp nest that they'd thoughtfully established right over the door to my shed. A short blast from a leftover can of bee/wasp killer took care of them. I'd have no compunction about using it on a yellow jacket nest, provided they were not active at the time (usually dusk is better) or there was any risk of a highly susceptible (to anaphylactic reactions) individual getting stung.

I can just imagine what contortions one would have to go through to get local yellow jacket protectionists (assuming any exist in the OP's area) to relocate the nest. Maybe there's an all-purpose Yellow Jacket-Scorpion-Flesh-Eating Bacteria Defense League that'll visit your property, assess the situation and advise you to move away to avoid disturbing the balance of nature.
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  #16  
Old 09-05-2011, 10:40 AM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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So it seems I have two options:

1) Accept that their existence is purposeful, good, and a acceptable. Yellowjackets are a creature whom I may not understand but I must come to to accept, my fear of possible death, while legitimate, does not give me the right to pre-emptively kill another living creature. We are all put on this earth for a reason; it is not my place to question why or to upset the balance of nature.

2) Screw nature. Nuke the bastards from orbit. Thanks to them I have an massive doctor bill, a compromised immune system, softball-sized blisters on both legs, my ass and most of my torso, a scary, deep muscle pain I've never felt before, and my newest fashion accessory - an epi-pen!

Death and destruction all the way.
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  #17  
Old 09-05-2011, 10:40 AM
Lightnin' Lightnin' is offline
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Are you absolutely certain that they're the aggressive kind?

I ask because I found hundreds of giant yellowjackets nesting in the ground on the side of my house a few weeks back. I started looking into the best way to kill them, but in the process I managed to find out that they were, in fact, Digger Wasps (or, more colloquially, Cicada Killers). It turned out that they're completely harmless- they just look scary- and they are actually very beneficial in that they keep the cicada population under control.

Like I said, they were completely harmless- I was able to walk right through their nesting area without a single sting. And a few weeks later, they're now mostly gone, having laid their eggs on the cicadas they dragged back into their burrows.

Last edited by Lightnin'; 09-05-2011 at 10:42 AM..
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  #18  
Old 09-05-2011, 11:17 AM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Originally Posted by Lightnin' View Post
Are you absolutely certain that they're the aggressive kind?
Read his post from the thread he linked to in the OP.

Relevant part:
Quote:
Nine stings
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  #19  
Old 09-05-2011, 11:20 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
So it seems I have two options:

1) Accept that their existence is purposeful, good, and a acceptable. Yellowjackets are a creature whom I may not understand but I must come to to accept, my fear of possible death, while legitimate, does not give me the right to pre-emptively kill another living creature. We are all put on this earth for a reason; it is not my place to question why or to upset the balance of nature.

2) Screw nature. Nuke the bastards from orbit. Thanks to them I have an massive doctor bill, a compromised immune system, softball-sized blisters on both legs, my ass and most of my torso, a scary, deep muscle pain I've never felt before, and my newest fashion accessory - an epi-pen!

Death and destruction all the way.
What about option 3 - call an expert to identify them first? I certainly didn't say anything about "not questioning or upsetting the balance of nature"; I said that species are protected and have their place, and if they aren't a danger to you, then why must everything that just *looks* dangerous be eliminated immediately? Surely there's a difference between a wasps nest in a kid's sandbox and one on the edge of a 15 m garden where you can easily keep away?

I also fail to see how it's the fault of yellowjackets that you have a doctors bill - that's the fault of your political health system.

If you are allergic to the stings from these, then that's a very different issue, an exception.

But then I wouldn't go near the nest for the extermination, either: call somebody competent and let them handle it, because if anything goes wrong, you'll get stung again. ( I just watched a short segment where they showed an exterminator at work getting rid of wasps in people's garden, and he cheerfully told of how many people burned down their garden sheds by trying fire, either with a flame-thrower or with gasoline, when he had a proven and safe powder, experience and knew what he was doing.
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  #20  
Old 09-05-2011, 11:54 AM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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I did this about four years ago in my back 40 - didn't need bitey-stingy-bug experts to tell me the wasps stung, they nailed one of my dogs. Luckily she didn't have an allergic reaction but she was covered in stings after running over the nest while I was throwing a frisbee for her.

I covered it with dirt, then took the opportunity to clear all the sticks and twigs on my property. Lit a small bonfire on top of the nest, didn't burn down any sheds, didn't cost me a penny, cleaned-up yard and no more wasps.

And I'm the sort who carefully carries spiders and moths outside and generally dislikes killing bugs, but mosquitoes, fleas and wasps that attack my little dog
get nuked, burned, poisoned, whatever works.
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  #21  
Old 09-05-2011, 11:59 AM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
What about option 3 - call an expert to identify them first? I certainly didn't say anything about "not questioning or upsetting the balance of nature"; I said that species are protected and have their place, and if they aren't a danger to you, then why must everything that just *looks* dangerous be eliminated immediately? Surely there's a difference between a wasps nest in a kid's sandbox and one on the edge of a 15 m garden where you can easily keep away?

I also fail to see how it's the fault of yellowjackets that you have a doctors bill - that's the fault of your political health system.

If you are allergic to the stings from these, then that's a very different issue, an exception.

But then I wouldn't go near the nest for the extermination, either: call somebody competent and let them handle it, because if anything goes wrong, you'll get stung again. ( I just watched a short segment where they showed an exterminator at work getting rid of wasps in people's garden, and he cheerfully told of how many people burned down their garden sheds by trying fire, either with a flame-thrower or with gasoline, when he had a proven and safe powder, experience and knew what he was doing.
Whoa. I didn't mean to sound snarky, and if I did I apologise. I was trying to make a joke. I understand what you're saying. I've never heard of yellowjackets being legally protected from homicidal homeowners, but I will look into it. Also, last night around midnight I donned double jeans, double chamois cotton shirts, cork loggers boots, leather work gloves, and a mosquito head net. All seams, joints and openings in my clothes sealed with duct tape . I took a mag-lite, wrapped the lens in that red automotive lens repair tape, grabbed a can of Raid, and went hunting.

And... I couldn't find the nest. I knew where it was, saw it in daylight, but for the life of me could not find the entrance. Do these guys fill the entrance to their nest at night? I didn't think they did, but I have no other explanation. I'm going searching again today, and am going to take pics for reference. Yes, I will be careful. I am considering calling an exterminator. We don't get freezing weather around here until January or so, not sure how long the nest says active. Do they stay active all winter in mild climates like ours?

Anyone know if there are any exterminator or entymologist Dopers on the board that might be able to shed some light on this situation?
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  #22  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:14 PM
Pasta Pasta is offline
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I've been following this guy's saga over the past couple of days (yellow jackets in garden).
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  #23  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:26 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
Do they stay active all winter in mild climates like ours?
What climate would that be?
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  #24  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:26 PM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
So it seems I have two options:

1) Accept that their existence.....
2) Screw nature. Nuke the bastards.....
or

3) Run in place and scream like a chicken.
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  #25  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:27 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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assuming we're talking about the yellowjackets which are a bit larger than honey bees, screw them. They're crackheads. I won't necessarily try to eradicate them, but if they mess with me I won't be very nice.

story time: when I was about 12 or so, my dad and uncle were re-shingling my grandmother's house. they were at one end of the house, pounding nails in. Right over the place where there was a nest of yellowjackets. Were the bastards bothering my dad and uncle? Nope. I come up the ladder at the other end of the house only to find about four of the tiny shits on my arms, stabbing at me madly.
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  #26  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:40 PM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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What climate would that be?
Southwest Oregon. Rarely freezes, lots of rain
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  #27  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:42 PM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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Originally Posted by Pasta View Post
I've been following this guy's saga over the past couple of days (yellow jackets in garden).
Now, this is cool. I want to see how this ends!
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  #28  
Old 09-05-2011, 12:45 PM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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I was on a job (painting) once when one of the guys replacing boards on the back deck inadertently disturbed a paper wasp nest. Whatever those wasps are that build big, ball-like nests suspended under decks or from trees.

They are really aggressive insects and will chase you down! The carpenter working on the deck had wasps up his shorts ....he went into shock and we had to call an ambulance for him. He was in the hospital for about 24 hours. Frankly I don't care if some insects are ecologically useful; if they pose a real danger and are on my property, they're toast.
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Old 09-05-2011, 12:53 PM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I was on a job (painting) once when one of the guys replacing boards on the back deck inadertently disturbed a paper wasp nest. Whatever those wasps are that build big, ball-like nests suspended under decks or from trees.

They are really aggressive insects and will chase you down! The carpenter working on the deck had wasps up his shorts ....he went into shock and we had to call an ambulance for him. He was in the hospital for about 24 hours. Frankly I don't care if some insects are ecologically useful; if they pose a real danger and are on my property, they're toast.
yellowjackets are a type of paper wasp, so yeah if they were aggressive that's what they could have been. The skinny dark brown/dark blue/black wasps are usually mud wasps, I think. Never been hassled by those.

Matter of fact, I don't think I've been stung by anything but yellowjackets.
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  #30  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:03 PM
Joey P Joey P is online now
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Originally Posted by Pasta View Post
I've been following this guy's saga over the past couple of days (yellow jackets in garden).
So the answer seems to be...5 traps and a skunk.
ETA, I just watched the last episode, something tells me he's going to need a few more visits from that skunk to kill all those eggs.

Last edited by Joey P; 09-05-2011 at 01:07 PM..
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  #31  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:16 PM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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Here's the nest. The hole in the center if the frame; its about the size of a 50 cent piece.

http://m1138.photobucket.com/albumvi...f5l0E%2F3yw%3D

Whatever is flying out is small, about the size of a honey bee. I can't tell if they're yellow or orange.
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  #32  
Old 09-05-2011, 01:30 PM
chiroptera chiroptera is offline
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I'm thinking what I've always called ground bees (the ones that got my dog) but this site calls them yellow jackets.

The nest I killed was just like that - a little hole in the ground while underneath was a huge hive containing hundreds, if not thousands, of yellow jackets. Nasty, aggressive, stinging insects.

Some wasps are completely benign and feed on truly harmful insects like flies and mosquitoes; IMO those should be left alone. But yellow jackets and any insect capable of delivering painful bites/stings or transmitting disease - kill, kill, kill.
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  #33  
Old 09-05-2011, 02:04 PM
Red Stilettos Red Stilettos is offline
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There are only two insects I won't tolerate nesting in my yard: yellowjackets and fire ants. For yellowjackets, I've successfully killed a nest only with Spectracide Pro (it has to be Pro, not the regular stuff). No other hornet killer has worked. I'm sure the stuff is horribly toxic, but I've been attacked by these territorial little beasts too many times to risk it again. In August, everything upsets them: mowing the grass, watering, just walking by. Not worth the risk in my opinion. They can nest in someone else's yard.
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Old 09-05-2011, 02:25 PM
Moonlitherial Moonlitherial is offline
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Originally Posted by Pasta View Post
I've been following this guy's saga over the past couple of days (yellow jackets in garden).
Well I watched all his videos and I think the short cut is - Lay bacon over the wasp nest and wait for a skunk to do the work for you.
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  #35  
Old 09-05-2011, 02:49 PM
FluffyBob FluffyBob is offline
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Shop vac. Just stick it in the entrance and agitate. Sucks them up as they come out. You can suck up the nest when it is empty. The dust in the vacuum incapacitates them effectively. The next day they will all be dead and you can empty the vacuum into a bag.

Used this trick many times. Never been stung this way. No poison, no messy garden hose mishaps. Fast. Easy. Safe.
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  #36  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:22 PM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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Well, apparently curiosity and bloodlust trumps common sense.

In an inspired moment of questionable genius, I decided to build a wasp trap. Photos in the above link. The bucket is about eight feet away from the nest. The nest is in the shadows at the base of the big lilac in the background of the first pic. I managed to place the trap without seeing any yellowjackets.
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  #37  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:30 PM
curlcoat curlcoat is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
What about option 3 - call an expert to identify them first? I certainly didn't say anything about "not questioning or upsetting the balance of nature"; I said that species are protected and have their place, and if they aren't a danger to you, then why must everything that just *looks* dangerous be eliminated immediately? Surely there's a difference between a wasps nest in a kid's sandbox and one on the edge of a 15 m garden where you can easily keep away?
Have you read the post in the Pit about where this nest is and what happened when the OP blundered into it?

Quote:
I also fail to see how it's the fault of yellowjackets that you have a doctors bill - that's the fault of your political health system.
What?

Quote:
If you are allergic to the stings from these, then that's a very different issue, an exception.
Again, apparently you haven't read the post that started all of this, that the OP linked to in his first post here.

These things are called meat bees here, because that is all they are interested in. They may pollinate by accident, but they are in no way a substitute for honeybees. They are highly aggressive and can sting/bite repeatedly, to the point that one needs to get medical attention even without a pre-existing allergy. For example, a friend of mine just had to take two of her dogs to the ER vet due to shock from the number of stings/bites they got when they stumbled into a nest, and as I said in the Pit thread, I essentially lost the use of a leg for awhile due to getting stung/bit by meat bees.

The problem with these things is that they are highly aggressive (they will continue to follow even after you remove yourself from the vicinity of their nest), they can sting/bite multiple times and they nest in the ground where you aren't likely to see them prior to being attacked. They may have a use in the wild, but in one's lawn, they need to be nuked from space.
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  #38  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:54 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
What about option 3 - call an expert to identify them first? I certainly didn't say anything about "not questioning or upsetting the balance of nature"; I said that species are protected and have their place, and if they aren't a danger to you, then why must everything that just *looks* dangerous be eliminated immediately? Surely there's a difference between a wasps nest in a kid's sandbox and one on the edge of a 15 m garden where you can easily keep away?
He's been attacked already and wound up needing medical attention, with continued pain and suffering. Granted, he probably mowed over their nest, which qualified as provocation, but they pursued him into the house. This does not sound like benign insects to me.

Quote:
If you are allergic to the stings from these, then that's a very different issue, an exception.
If they issued an epi-pen there is reason to believe a life-threatening reaction is a real possibility. So yeah, apparently he's allergic. Which means the wasps have to go.
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  #39  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:55 PM
jasg jasg is offline
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Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
Any dopers out there have experience dealing with these types of nests? All info is much appreciated. I really don't want to go to the hospital again.

Thanks.
My approach (had a bad nest several years ago).

Procrastination.

Quote:
From UC Davis.

"Normally, yellowjacket and paper wasp colonies live only one season. In very mild winters or in coastal California south of San Francisco, however, some yellowjacket colonies survive for several years and become quite large."
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Old 09-05-2011, 04:34 PM
Red Stilettos Red Stilettos is offline
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We don't get freezing weather around here until January or so, not sure how long the nest says active. Do they stay active all winter in mild climates like ours?
I live in Atlanta and yellowjackets are only problematic through about mid-September. I don't think the temperatures are killing them, because it's nowhere near freezing at that point. Perhaps they are responding to shortened daylight? Regardless, I would expect that your yellowjacket's nest days of activity are numbered for this year. Of course, they could overwinter and come back next year, so I still wouldn't ignore them. Spectracide Pro at dusk. It will also kill returning hornets, if any are out scavenging when you spray. Oh, and it will also kill the surrounding grass. Just FYI.
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  #41  
Old 09-05-2011, 04:54 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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You have my full support for killing wasps in your yard - like everyone else was saying, they are about the only insect I know that just bites you for the sheer hell of it. My husband was walking around in our back yard one day, and a wasp came out of the nest in the ground 10 feet away and bit him on the lip just because he was there.

I wish you all the best in eradicating your unwanted pests, Lancia.
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  #42  
Old 09-05-2011, 05:32 PM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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ISO gasoline, I recommend that you use kerosene (safer). Spary with insecticide (after dark, of course), then pour 1-2 cups of kerosene into the nest.
Next morning, they should all be dead.
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  #43  
Old 09-05-2011, 06:02 PM
papergirl papergirl is offline
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I'm not a bug-killer...most everything gets a free pass in my domain. But not yellowjackets, for a couple of reasons. As has been noted, they're vicious and vile and won't be happy until you're lying dead in the garden with them feasting on your body. And because they like to eat dead things, when they sting you they're likely to cause a nasty infection. My youngest son missed his first two days of 1st grade because of a seriously infected yellowjacket sting. A few years later (just a couple of months ago) my dog bumbled over a nest and ended up going to the emergency vet.
So...yellowjackets are one of maybe two creatures on my list that get a "KILL KILL KILL" designation. I do it by soaking a small rag in lighter fluid, stuffing into the nesting hole, and lighting it on fire. Watch it burn and try not to gloat, because you still have to consider your karma here. It's worked every time for me.
As a side note, I try to say this every time I get a chance: Everyone in the WORLD should have a bottle of (preferably liquid) Benadryl or a generic form of it in their cabinet and in their glovebox. You don't know when your next sting will result in an anaphylactic reaction, and Benadryl can save your life. I've read more than one case of someone who was able to make it to the hospital because they happened to have a bottle of kid's Benadryl in the kitchen and thought to drink it while someone called 911.
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  #44  
Old 09-05-2011, 06:39 PM
Koxinga Koxinga is offline
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Originally Posted by constanze View Post
I also fail to see how it's the fault of yellowjackets that you have a doctors bill - that's the fault of your political health system.
Oooo, schnapp! I guess the price one pays for having fellow taxpayers hold up the burden for one's every misfortune, though, is an inculcated inability to make the simplest decisions about ones own yard without helpful guidance from the protective hand of the State.

Last edited by Koxinga; 09-05-2011 at 06:43 PM..
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  #45  
Old 09-05-2011, 07:38 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is online now
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I've killed yellowjacket nests with liquid Sevin before. I just mixed up a gallon and poured it down the nest after dark. Did the job well, and Sevin doesn't stick around long, it breaks down.
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  #46  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:12 PM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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Well, my trap is an utter failure. I baited it with ham, orange slices, and strawberry jam. Nothing. Now I'm starting to wonder if they really are yellowjackets.
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  #47  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:23 PM
Cat Whisperer Cat Whisperer is offline
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Location: Lethbridge, AB.
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I have used a wasp trap in the past; I believe my most successful bait was a mixture of tuna and apple juice. Most disgusting pairing of food ever; ambrosia to wasps.
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  #48  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:26 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Location: I'm right here!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
Well, my trap is an utter failure. I baited it with ham, orange slices, and strawberry jam. Nothing. Now I'm starting to wonder if they really are yellowjackets.
Maybe they have internet access, watched the Youtube videos, and saw the writing on the wall and booked.
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  #49  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:29 PM
HMS Irruncible HMS Irruncible is offline
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Originally Posted by EarlyMan View Post
And there's no need to ignite it, either. I know there are those who will cite pollution issues, but check out the ingredients on the bug killer labels. You'll find they're just as bad.

EarlyMan
This. Gasoline fumes are heavier than air and will sink to the bottom. Igniting the gasoline is unnecessary, but deeply emotionally satisfying. But if you do choose to ignite, do give the fumes a full half hour to do their work.
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  #50  
Old 09-05-2011, 08:37 PM
Lancia Lancia is online now
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Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
This. Gasoline fumes are heavier than air and will sink to the bottom. Igniting the gasoline is unnecessary, but deeply emotionally satisfying. But if you do choose to ignite, do give the fumes a full half hour to do their work.
I brought this up with my dad, who has experience with this sort of thing. His recommendation: some used motor oil, to keep them from escaping, followed by a gas/oil mix, followed by a lit match. I imagine watching those guys burn is satisfying, but am not sure how necessary the fire is. I doubt the fire reaches the underground chamber, and just manages to suck out the gas fumes.
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