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  #1  
Old 09-06-2011, 11:20 AM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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Is it illegal to drink your own alcohol on a plane?

On a domestic flight last night, my wife and I finished the ice water we'd been served, then we each poured a 50ml serving of scotch (which my wife had carried on in her purse) over the leftover ice.

A flight attendant came down the aisle collecting trash, and as my wife deposited the two tiny bottles he said to her, "You know you're not allowed to bring your own booze on a plane, it's illegal." To which she replied, "No, I didn't know that." The FA said, "Well, you'll know for next time," and went on his way. At no time, however, did he or anybody else try to take our drinks away or stop us from consuming them. We've done this plenty of times before and never tried to hide it, and nobody has said a word about it until this time.

So I decided to check it out, and the TSA website says this:
Quote:
Travelers may now carry through security checkpoints travel-size toiletries (3 ounces or less) that fit comfortably in ONE, QUART-SIZE, clear plastic, zip-top bag.

With the exception of medications, any amount of liquid including alcohol greater than three ounces must be packed in your checked baggage.

Liquids, including alcohol purchased after clearing the security checkpoint are permitted aboard aircraft.
Not a word, though, about actually drinking said alcohol on board.

Additional googling found mostly the same information on various sites, including some of the airlines' own, but the question about drinking carried-on liquor remains mostly unanswered. The only page I found that seems to back up the FA's assertion was on something called eHow.com:
Quote:
Additionally, any alcohol that is personally brought on board an aircraft cannot be consumed.
You'll surely forgive me if I don't accept this site I'd never heard of as the final word on the subject. Seems to me that if this is indeed illegal, nobody is going out of their way to tell people about this or to enforce it. Anybody know the real Straight Dope?
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  #2  
Old 09-06-2011, 11:36 AM
mhendo mhendo is offline
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I can't seem to find anything definitive on this either.

I've found a few other "cites" similar to yours, with people on the internet claiming that it's illegal, but not offering any actual evidence except their own words.

Another possibility that occurred to me was that the flight attendant was confusing "illegal" with "against the rules." It's possible that it's legal to drink your own alcohol on a flight, but that it's also against the airline's own rules. But a search of three different airline websites (Delta, Southwest, United) turned up no rules about consuming your own alcohol on a plane.
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  #3  
Old 09-06-2011, 11:49 AM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is offline
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Don't know about "illegal," but Continental says:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Continental Airlines
Only alcoholic beverages served by a flight attendant may be consumed on board.
United says the same thing.

American Airlines says:

Quote:
Originally Posted by American Airlines
Please note that only alcoholic beverages served by a flight attendant may be consumed onboard...
Couldn't find anything like this on Delta's website or Southwest Airlines' website.
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  #4  
Old 09-06-2011, 11:53 AM
rogerbox rogerbox is offline
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I found this cite which seems to say it is okay to drink your own alcohol only if you can get the flight stewards to serve you: http://law.justia.com/cfr/title14/14....20.11.30.html

This seems to be some kind of law instead of just airline policy, but I am not educated on legal matters so I don't know the jurisdiction.

Quote:
(a) No person may drink any alcoholic beverage aboard an aircraft unless the certificate holder operating the aircraft has served that beverage to him.
(b) No certificate holder may serve any alcoholic beverage to any person aboard any of its aircraft who—
(1) Appears to be intoxicated;
(2) Is escorting a person or being escorted in accordance with 49 CFR 1544.221; or
(3) Has a deadly or dangerous weapon accessible to him while aboard the aircraft in accordance with 49 CFR 1544.219, 1544.221, or 1544.223.
(c) No certificate holder may allow any person to board any of its aircraft if that person appears to be intoxicated.
(d) Each certificate holder shall, within five days after the incident, report to the Administrator the refusal of any person to comply with paragraph (a) of this section, or of any disturbance caused by a person who appears to be intoxicated aboard any of its aircraft.

Last edited by rogerbox; 09-06-2011 at 11:54 AM..
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  #5  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:18 PM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Interesting...on one of my spring break trips to Acapulco (from Canada), "someone" cracked a bottle and passed it around the plane. The flight attendants became quite irate and reported us to the pilot who announced over the P.A. that consuming alcohol on the flight was illegal and whoever was responsible was to stash it immediately and no further action would be taken.
So I looked it up, Canadian Aviation Regulations state...

Quote:
Alcohol or Drugs - Passengers
602.04 (1) In this section, "intoxicating liquor" means a beverage that contains more than 2.5 per cent proof spirits.
(2) No person shall consume on board an aircraft an intoxicating liquor unless the intoxicating liquor
(a) has been served to that person by the operator of the aircraft; or
(b) where no flight attendant is on board, has been provided by the operator of the aircraft.
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogerbox View Post
I found this cite which seems to say it is okay to drink your own alcohol only if you can get the flight stewards to serve you: http://law.justia.com/cfr/title14/14....20.11.30.html
I think your interpretation is incorrect.

(a) No person may drink any alcoholic beverage aboard an aircraft unless the certificate holder operating the aircraft has served that beverage to him.

I would read this as you can only consume the alcoholic beverages that are supplied by the operator of the aircraft.
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  #6  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:22 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogerbox View Post
I found this cite which seems to say it is okay to drink your own alcohol only if you can get the flight stewards to serve you: http://law.justia.com/cfr/title14/14....20.11.30.html

This seems to be some kind of law instead of just airline policy, but I am not educated on legal matters so I don't know the jurisdiction.
To be specific, it's a section of the Code of Federal Regulations and thus it is a federal regulation, and the jurisdiction is the United States.
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  #7  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:25 PM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Liquids, including alcohol purchased after clearing the security checkpoint are permitted aboard aircraft.
A perfect example of a missing comma making a rule ambiguous.
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  #8  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:33 PM
rogerbox rogerbox is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
I would read this as you can only consume the alcoholic beverages that are supplied by the operator of the aircraft.
"(a) No person may drink any alcoholic beverage aboard an aircraft unless the certificate holder operating the aircraft has served that beverage to him."

It says nothing about where the alcohol came from, only that you may only drink it if it is SERVED to you by the certificate holder (steward). Since we know it is legal to bring liquor on board sealed, the above sentence makes it seem that it is okay to give your sealed alcohol to the steward and have them serve it to you.
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  #9  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:38 PM
MPB in Salt Lake MPB in Salt Lake is offline
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If a flight attendant tells you directly not to do something, then continuing to do it could (at least technically, if not usually in practice) wind up getting you charged with "Interfering With a Flight Crew" as some guy found out earlier today, when he was arrested for turning on his i-Phone while the flight was still taxiing to the gate after landing, despite repeatedly being told to turn it off by the flight attendant....
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  #10  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:39 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Illegal/against the rules/whatever, done discretely no one needs to know it is happening.
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  #11  
Old 09-06-2011, 12:40 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogerbox View Post
It says nothing about where the alcohol came from, only that you may only drink it if it is SERVED to you by the certificate holder (steward). Since we know it is legal to bring liquor on board sealed, the above sentence makes it seem that it is okay to give your sealed alcohol to the steward and have them serve it to you.
Maybe, maybe not. Generally, it's not a good idea to guess exactly what terms like this mean when used in the law.
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  #12  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:05 PM
Skammer Skammer is offline
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You can ask the steward to serve it to you; the worst that can happen is he says "no" and you have to put it away.
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  #13  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:26 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Think of the airplane as a long skinny bar with unpleasant seats. Whether it's on the ground or in the air, there's a gaggle of laws regarding the legal and proper service of alcoholic beverages.

Would you expect to get hollered at by the bartender if you pulled a bottle of booze out of your pocket and started drinking it? At most bars, you'd get a stern warning at the least, and quite likely, shown the door. Same thing in the air, except as noted above, you could be looking at charges of interfering with the flight crew, which is a bit of a catch-all, but the end result is you're being grilled by the Feds for a while. Not my idea of a good way to end a flight.

OTOH, if you keep that bottle in your pocket and didn't touch it at any time you're at the bar, the bartender or server won't know and won't care.
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  #14  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:31 PM
rogerbox rogerbox is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gotpasswords View Post
Think of the airplane as a long skinny bar with unpleasant seats. Whether it's on the ground or in the air, there's a gaggle of laws regarding the legal and proper service of alcoholic beverages.

Would you expect to get hollered at by the bartender if you pulled a bottle of booze out of your pocket and started drinking it? At most bars, you'd get a stern warning at the least, and quite likely, shown the door. Same thing in the air, except as noted above, you could be looking at charges of interfering with the flight crew, which is a bit of a catch-all, but the end result is you're being grilled by the Feds for a while. Not my idea of a good way to end a flight.

OTOH, if you keep that bottle in your pocket and didn't touch it at any time you're at the bar, the bartender or server won't know and won't care.
Except the OP is trying to figure out what is LEGAL in the air, not what will be against the airline rules. The stewardess specifically claimed it was illegal to drink their own alcohol.

Last edited by rogerbox; 09-06-2011 at 01:31 PM..
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  #15  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:33 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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Whatever the rule, it's been around for quite some time. Calvin Trillin wrote about it in a book published in 1978 ("But surely the rule wasn't meant to apply to a Chateau Margaritte '73!").

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogerbox View Post
Except the OP is trying to figure out what is LEGAL in the air, not what will be against the airline rules. The stewardess specifically claimed it was illegal to drink their own alcohol.
roger - legal is whatever the airlines say is against the rules. "Interfering With a Flight Crew," remember? That makes disobeying any rules the airline makes illegal.

Last edited by silenus; 09-06-2011 at 01:36 PM..
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  #16  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:35 PM
silenus silenus is offline
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duplicate post

Last edited by silenus; 09-06-2011 at 01:36 PM..
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  #17  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:45 PM
rogerbox rogerbox is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silenus View Post
roger - legal is whatever the airlines say is against the rules. "Interfering With a Flight Crew," remember? That makes disobeying any rules the airline makes illegal.
That's a good point. But the thread title says "Is it illegal to drink your own alcohol on a plane?" which I read to mean "barring airline regulations is the act of drinking your own alcohol on a plane illegal?"

The stewardess who told him he couldn't drink his own alcohol because it was illegal obviously meant it that way instead of a "interfering with the flight clue is illegal" sense of the word (assuming the OP was not on a vodka-fuelled rampage at the time! )
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  #18  
Old 09-06-2011, 01:49 PM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MPB in Salt Lake View Post
If a flight attendant tells you directly not to do something, then continuing to do it could (at least technically, if not usually in practice) wind up getting you charged with "Interfering With a Flight Crew" as some guy found out earlier today, when he was arrested for turning on his i-Phone while the flight was still taxiing to the gate after landing, despite repeatedly being told to turn it off by the flight attendant....
You are correct, and if the flight attendant had said "I'll need to take those from you" or "Sorry, we can't let you drink that," we surely would have complied. Just the ambiguous "You'll know for next time" and then he left us to enjoy our libations in peace.

My suspicion is that if we'd gotten plastered and caused a disturbance, that we -- and probably the FA for not stopping us after he'd discovered our crime -- could have gotten in big trouble. But he made a judgement call that we weren't going to cause any problems with our ounce and a half of sippin' scotch and decided to be cool about it.

As I said in the OP, we've handed empty liquor bottles to flight attendants before with no verbal admonishments, and honestly had no inkling we were doing anything illicit.
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  #19  
Old 09-06-2011, 03:08 PM
cruel butterfly cruel butterfly is offline
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There was a case in New Mexico where a passenger had been over-served during a flight (meaning that he had been allowed to consume alcohol far past the legal limit of .08 BAC). Once the plane landed in Albuquerque, this passenger either rented a car or retrieved his own vehicle, ended up on the wrong side of I-40, and plowed into a carload of people killing some or all...can't quite remember.

In this case, the flight crew and the airline were held responsible because the law in NM is that the seller/provider of the alcohol is directly responsible for intoxication levels of consumers. I can imagine that after this particular event, flight crew members might be a little extra cautious about how much alcohol is being consumed during any given flight. Allowing people to bring and consume their own alcohol would make it pretty much impossible to monitor intoxication levels.
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Old 09-06-2011, 03:16 PM
cruel butterfly cruel butterfly is offline
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Cite
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  #21  
Old 09-06-2011, 04:22 PM
iamthewalrus(:3= iamthewalrus(:3= is offline
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Aren't a lot of people missing the big picture, here?

Scotch should be served neat.

I've definitely drunk my own booze on airplanes and never knew it was against the rules, although I did so discreetly, and before the 3 oz. liquid restriction was in place.
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  #22  
Old 09-06-2011, 06:22 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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It appears that liquor licensing is a provincial/state level thing; airlines need permission to buy or sell alcohol in each jurisdiction (they buy in the local jurisdiction before loading supplies onto a plane before each trip).

Here's a suggestive bit of the (possibly outdated version) Ontario liquor control act, which refers to the detention of aircraft if the carriers are found to contravene the various regulations:
Quote:
Detention of vehicles, etc.

44.1 (1) For any purpose relating to the administration and enforcement of this Act, the Liquor Control Act and their regulations, any person authorized by the Registrar who has reasonable and probable grounds to believe that a vehicle, a vessel, railway equipment on rails or an aircraft contains evidence of a contravention of any of those Acts and regulations,

(a) may, without warrant, stop and detain the vehicle, vessel, equipment or aircraft;

(b) may examine its contents, including any cargo, manifests, records, accounts, vouchers, papers or other documents that may afford evidence as to the contravention; and

(c) subject to subsection (2), may seize and take away any of the manifests, records, accounts, vouchers, papers or other documents and retain them until they are produced in a court proceeding. 1994, c. 18, s. 5 (4); 2006, c. 34, s. 16 (52).
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Old 09-06-2011, 06:36 PM
mnemosyne mnemosyne is offline
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A bit more research:

Manitoba states:
Quote:
Carriage of liquor on train

116(3) A person who is in lawful possession of liquor may transport or carry it in a train, bus, or aircraft if it is enclosed in, and remains in, his personal baggage.
So in at least that jurisdiction, it is illegal to drink your own alcohol on a plane.

Texas' law seems to be here. I would think that if it is otherwise illegal to consume alcohol bought off the premises, then it is also illegal to do so on a plane, but I'm not inclined to read the whole thing to check.
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  #24  
Old 09-06-2011, 07:24 PM
BellRungBookShut-CandleSnuffed BellRungBookShut-CandleSnuffed is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
So I looked it up, Canadian Aviation Regulations state...

Quote:
...2.5 per cent proof spirits.
What the heck is 2.5% proof? Is it 1.25% ABV?
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  #25  
Old 09-07-2011, 07:09 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rogerbox View Post
"(a) No person may drink any alcoholic beverage aboard an aircraft unless the certificate holder operating the aircraft has served that beverage to him."

It says nothing about where the alcohol came from, only that you may only drink it if it is SERVED to you by the certificate holder (steward). Since we know it is legal to bring liquor on board sealed, the above sentence makes it seem that it is okay to give your sealed alcohol to the steward and have them serve it to you.
Nope.
The certificate holder operating the aircraft is the airline not the steward.

Secondly, they don't mean "served" in the sense of physically pouring you a drink they mean served as being provided on their menu.
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  #26  
Old 09-07-2011, 08:41 AM
StrangerThanFiction StrangerThanFiction is offline
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rogerbox nailed it. 14 CFR §121.525 (which he quoted) is the regulation dealing with consumption of alcohol on board airliners. The spirit of the regulation (sorry) is that an employee of the aircraft operator needs to serve you your drinks so they have the ability to cut you off before you become a problem. It is a violation of this federal regulation to bring your own alcohol and serve yourself or others. As mentioned up thread, you can drink your own booze if you can convince a flight attendant to serve it to you. I would venture a guess that most airlines have policies prohibiting this so that those who want to get sauced have to buy a bunch of $7 beers.

Charter companies operate under a different set of regulations, but the rule dealing with passenger consumption of alcoholic beverages is very similar. Many smaller airplanes don't have flight attendants, so this can be a tricky one to comply with. In practice, any alcohol the passengers bring on board will be stowed by the flight crew before they go forward to start the engines. This exchange of custody is enough to satisfy the letter of the law, but it doesn't exactly prevent the passengers from getting schnockered if they want to.
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Old 09-07-2011, 01:34 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
It appears that liquor licensing is a provincial/state level thing; airlines need permission to buy or sell alcohol in each jurisdiction (they buy in the local jurisdiction before loading supplies onto a plane before each trip).

Here's a suggestive bit of the (possibly outdated version) Ontario liquor control act, which refers to the detention of aircraft if the carriers are found to contravene the various regulations:
As I recall, there was an episode in the 1970's when Air Canada ran afoul of Ontario liquor laws and had their license pulled. Flights had to refrain from serving alcohol in Ontario airspace for a few months.

Of course, if you have duty-free, you will likely have evry large bottles of consumables; I'm surprised the law is not more explicit about this situation. But then, the jurisdiction issue becomes even more interesting on international flights.
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Old 09-07-2011, 02:04 PM
Folacin Folacin is offline
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Originally Posted by StrangerThanFiction View Post
It is a violation of this federal regulation to bring your own alcohol and serve yourself or others. As mentioned up thread, you can drink your own booze if you can convince a flight attendant to serve it to you. I would venture a guess that most airlines have policies prohibiting this so that those who want to get sauced have to buy a bunch of $7 beers.
On a charter vacation flight (FunJet maybe?) back from Jamaica ca. 1986, the flight attendants announced that it was illegal to pour your own drinks. They were happy, however, to pour your duty-free rum into the glasses they provided.
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Old 09-07-2011, 02:23 PM
Anne Neville Anne Neville is offline
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Originally Posted by StrangerThanFiction View Post
I would venture a guess that most airlines have policies prohibiting this so that those who want to get sauced have to buy a bunch of $7 beers.
Drunken passengers have been involved in a number of air rage incidents. The flight crew presumably don't want to have to deal with an angry drunk in a situation where leaving the scene is difficult (would you?). If they let passengers bring their own alcohol on board and serve it to themselves, they don't have the option of cutting off someone who's getting drunk and belligerent.
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Old 09-07-2011, 03:23 PM
rogerbox rogerbox is offline
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Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
Nope.
Secondly, they don't mean "served" in the sense of physically pouring you a drink they mean served as being provided on their menu.
How do you know this exactly? And it isn't "their" menu since the law is not written by airlines.

Last edited by rogerbox; 09-07-2011 at 03:27 PM..
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Old 09-07-2011, 10:23 PM
StrangerThanFiction StrangerThanFiction is offline
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Originally Posted by Anne Neville View Post
Drunken passengers have been involved in a number of air rage incidents. The flight crew presumably don't want to have to deal with an angry drunk in a situation where leaving the scene is difficult (would you?). If they let passengers bring their own alcohol on board and serve it to themselves, they don't have the option of cutting off someone who's getting drunk and belligerent.
I agree with you 100%, and the intent of the law is most certainly to prevent such situations. The point I was trying to make is that I don't believe most airlines will serve your own liquor to you, and that policy has nothing to do with legality. Rather, I think it is mostly due to the fact that the airlines have a combination of a very captive audience and liquor for sale at inflated prices. Folacin provided an anecdote that would seem to indicate that some carriers will serve your own alcohol to you. I'd be interested to know what Delta or British Airways has to say about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky812 View Post
Secondly, they don't mean "served" in the sense of physically pouring you a drink they mean served as being provided on their menu.
I'm pretty sure physically handing you a drink is exactly what the term means in this context. The regulation is about controlling the amount of alcohol a passenger consumes; the FAA couldn't care less who brought it on board.

Last edited by StrangerThanFiction; 09-07-2011 at 10:28 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 09-08-2011, 06:46 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StrangerThanFiction View Post

I'm pretty sure physically handing you a drink is exactly what the term means in this context. The regulation is about controlling the amount of alcohol a passenger consumes; the FAA couldn't care less who brought it on board.
Yes, I agree, my wording was off. Serving it to you is part of that the broader definition but I didn't want to exclude flights with no wait staff and self-serve policies.
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  #33  
Old 09-08-2011, 07:00 AM
Scougs Scougs is offline
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I'm in the UK, not the US, but most airlines seem to have a written rule that "only alcohol purchased on board may be consumed on board" (where you purchase it) or "only alcohol served by the cabin crew may be consumed on board" (where it's complimentary.

I've always assumed this is the case for all airlines, and is specifically to stop drunkenness and associated behaviour. I absolutely dread to picture your average charter flight to Manchester from the Costa Del Sol if people could buy a litre of spirits at the airport and crack it open on the flight.

I have come across one exception, and I was very glad I did a bit of research on the airline prior to flying with them: EgyptAir. It's a dry airline - they don't provide or sell any alcohol on board, but don't mind if you bring your own. It was in the days before the 100ml rule, so a nice bottle of champagne went with us for the flight. The cabin crew provided us with glasses and ice. This was Heathrow to Cairo - I wonder what they do if there are actual laws in place preventing this?
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  #34  
Old 09-09-2011, 07:25 PM
medstar medstar is offline
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What would stop someone from dying a small amount of vodka a pretty pink color and surreptitiously adding it to their purchased soft drink? I'd imagine that if you didn't call undue attention to yourself, you could probably get away with this.
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  #35  
Old 09-12-2011, 07:37 AM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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Originally Posted by medstar View Post
What would stop someone from dying a small amount of vodka a pretty pink color and surreptitiously adding it to their purchased soft drink? I'd imagine that if you didn't call undue attention to yourself, you could probably get away with this.
While I'd hate for this to turn into a "how to get away with something illegal" thread, I can say that in my experience -- not realizing I was doing anything wrong -- when I've discreetly poured a shot of vodka into a cup of Sprite I have never once been called out for it. When I poured a bit of scotch, which has a stronger aroma, and my wife handed the bottles to the Flight Attendant, we got a very mild verbal rebuke. So it doesn't seem as if iron-fisted enforcement of this rule is a huge priority.

I might add that a have never been intoxicated or confrontational on a plane, which I'm sure would make a huge difference. And, now that I know it's a no-no, I'm not sure how far I'd like to continue to test the airlines' tolerance of scofflaws like me.
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  #36  
Old 03-24-2014, 01:14 PM
amulree amulree is offline
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is it illegal to drink your own alcohol on a plane

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wheelz View Post
On a domestic flight last night, my wife and I finished the ice water we'd been served, then we each poured a 50ml serving of scotch (which my wife had carried on in her purse) over the leftover ice.

A flight attendant came down the aisle collecting trash, and as my wife deposited the two tiny bottles he said to her, "You know you're not allowed to bring your own booze on a plane, it's illegal." To which she replied, "No, I didn't know that." The FA said, "Well, you'll know for next time," and went on his way. At no time, however, did he or anybody else try to take our drinks away or stop us from consuming them. We've done this plenty of times before and never tried to hide it, and nobody has said a word about it until this time.

So I decided to check it out, and the TSA website says this: Not a word, though, about actually drinking said alcohol on board.



Additional googling found mostly the same information on various sites, including some of the airlines' own, but the question about drinking carried-on liquor remains mostly unanswered. The only page I found that seems to back up the FA's assertion was on something called eHow.com:You'll surely forgive me if I don't accept this site I'd never heard of as the final word on the subject. Seems to me that if this is indeed illegal, nobody is going out of their way to tell people about this or to enforce it. Anybody know the real Straight Dope?
i worked for british airways and we could not stop people drinking their on alcohol we just had to stop them getting too drunk and advised them to be discreet I dont imagine BA were not following rules set down
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  #37  
Old 03-24-2014, 07:21 PM
bob++ bob++ is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2013
As an aside - Some cruise lines have a rule prohibiting passengers from bringing alcohol on board. Some allow beer and some wine but not spirits. The cruise websites have examples of several ways of 'smuggling' booze on board. This is done for no other reason than to protect their own sales.

Anything they find that's not permitted is confiscated and returned at voyage end. Something to check before you stock up for your next cruise.
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  #38  
Old 03-24-2014, 08:37 PM
CanTak3 CanTak3 is offline
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I was just on a Delta flight last week and I can confirm they do not allow alcohol to be brought on board. It stated this in their seat pamphlet. I doubt I would be violating an actual law mind you; just the company policy.
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  #39  
Old 03-25-2014, 02:43 AM
Chihuahua Chihuahua is offline
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It has been my long experience that the law, a company's policy, and what the employee actually heard on orientation day are three completely different and often unrelated things.
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