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Old 11-26-2011, 09:01 PM
Indygrrl Indygrrl is offline
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The Aldi/Trader Joe's connection

Awhile back, I read somewhere that Aldi carries many of the same items as Trader Joe's, but in different packaging. I've been shopping there and I can't believe how many items are the same. Last week, I was at TJ and they were giving away samples of goat cheese with dried cranberries in it (ick), and last night I saw that exact thing at Aldi. I've also seen other fancy-ish cheese, cookies, and some refrigerated items. Oh! And some cinnamon rolls in a can that were identical to ones I recently got from TJ.

Years ago I was told by a German co-worker that the chocolate they sell at Aldi is pretty good quality stuff. And she was right, it really is.

I love Aldi!

And as an aside, why on earth do people think Trader Joe's is a health food store? I always call it my fancy snack store, and I haven't seen much of anything that looks super healthy to me. Unless they are talking about wine, haha.
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:07 PM
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I think that I'd love to have an Aldi here. It sounds like a great store. The closest Trader Joe's to me is about 70 miles away. Every time I'm in the area, I buy as much canned catfood as I can transport home. Its Wellness quality at Purina prices. If there is room left, I'll get some very yummy people food.

I've never thought of TJ's as a health food place. Perhaps people think that way because their food is good quality? Less chemicals and processing=healthy, so it must be a health food store? I'm just grasping here.
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  #3  
Old 11-26-2011, 10:12 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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From Wiki:
Quote:
Trader Joe's was founded by Joe Coulombe and is owned, since 1979, by a family trust set up by the late German businessman Theo Albrecht, one of the two brothers behind the German discount supermarket chain Aldi Nord.
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:26 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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AAnd as an aside, why on earth do people think Trader Joe's is a health food store?
That's a new one to me. I've never heard that.
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Old 11-26-2011, 11:11 PM
Mr Downtown Mr Downtown is offline
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I was afraid this thread would repeat the mistaken notion that they're "the same company," but Johnny L.A. has already explained that part.

I do notice that in the last year or so Aldi seems to be celebrating its German heritage more and more, with the Deutsche Kuche line of things like schnitzel, and German Christmas cookies and stollen. I've also been quite impressed by the cheap wine and dark chocolate.
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Old 11-26-2011, 11:20 PM
Pawsrent Pawsrent is offline
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They recently opened an Aldiin my neighborhood, and I love it. And I think it's a health food store because it's eco friendly.
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Old 11-27-2011, 12:03 AM
Indygrrl Indygrrl is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
From Wiki:
Damn, haha, that's what I get for not Googling before posting. I still think it's cool though, and not exactly common knowledge. As for the Trader Joe's=health food store thing, it might have been a post in the Pit or somewhere that gave me the idea. I've heard people say it before, though, and that's funny to me, again, because I consider TJ higher-end junk food.
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Old 11-27-2011, 02:08 AM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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We lived near an Aldi in Ohio, but rarely shopped there because the selection was so bad. I rarely make the trip to Trader Joe's either, because I can't do all (or even most) of my shopping there. Where do you guys find /the extra time to go to these stores?
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Old 11-27-2011, 03:04 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Er... the closest grocery store to me is an Aldi's. It's also on the way to/from the post office, butcher, bank, a library branch, and gas station so I can make it part of a general string of errands.

Last edited by Broomstick; 11-27-2011 at 03:06 AM..
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Old 11-27-2011, 04:35 AM
FairyChatMom FairyChatMom is online now
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I've never been in either store and I have no idea where the nearest ones may be - my own fault for living in the boonies...
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Old 11-27-2011, 05:11 AM
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I don't know if it's true anymore, but, when I was younger, I noticed that Sonic and Dairy Queen always had the same things. When one got something new, the other wasn't far behind. And, as far as I know, they aren't connected, and you wouldn't even think they'd be each other's primary competition.
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Old 11-27-2011, 06:18 AM
BeaMyra BeaMyra is offline
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I love Aldi's the thing is you have certain things that are great. And some things that are vile, you can't tell till you buy.

Generally their staples, bread, flour, milk, rice, dry beans and eggs are great. It's when you get into things like canned veggies or condiments or snack food. Some are good some are not. You have to try it and see.

For some reason I love Aldi Coffee but that must be just me, I bet few would agree.
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:21 AM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is online now
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I keep singing the thread title to "The Rainbow Connection".

The closest TJ is about 30 minutes from here. An Aldi's is 10. Never checked it out, but may need to now!
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:23 AM
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What BeaMyra said. The things I love:

They have two varieties of bagged lettuce -- a butter mix and a spring mix -- that are great and only $1.99 a bag. The comparable products by Dole in our other grocery store are $3.50. If Aldi just had arugula at bargain prices, I'd never go anywhere else for salad greens. (OK, I take that back. I don't like their bagged spinach.) Their EVOO is also a great deal.

I buy a lot of La Croix sparkling water. The Aldi brand, La Vie, is about half the price. It only comes in lime, but I actually like it better than the La Croix lime.
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:27 AM
Omega Glory Omega Glory is offline
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Originally Posted by OpalCat View Post
We lived near an Aldi in Ohio, but rarely shopped there because the selection was so bad. I rarely make the trip to Trader Joe's either, because I can't do all (or even most) of my shopping there. Where do you guys find /the extra time to go to these stores?
My Aldi has almost every product the other grocery stores have.
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:59 AM
don't ask don't ask is offline
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Amongst the people I know, if you have a three digit IQ there are a shitload of things that you buy at Aldi because you can buy top quality stuff far cheaper than elsewhere. Mind you they are easy to get to and open at good times around here.
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Old 11-27-2011, 08:06 AM
Bloodless Turnip Bloodless Turnip is offline
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Aldi always has the best prices for ground beef here. I got a sack of tangerines for 99 cents and a bag of potatoes for 99 cents two weeks ago.

Matter of fact, I need to make an Aldi trip tomorrow.
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  #18  
Old 11-27-2011, 11:19 AM
Mrs. Cake Mrs. Cake is offline
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TJ's can be a health food option if you shop it that way. They have a lot of the same things at better prices - natural cereals, organic or non-organic fruit & veg, plenty of vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free ingredients and prepared foods, natural cleansers, vitamins and supplements, soy and almond milk, organic meats and dairy, etc. I do about 90% of my normal weekly shopping there, with the exception of some bulk items. Probably save about 30% on the average from buying at the local health food store.

Of course, it is easy to look past these and go straight for the wine & party stuff, which I have certainly done many time over the years.
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Old 11-27-2011, 12:38 PM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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My Aldi has almost every product the other grocery stores have.
Wow, that's way different from the Aldi near where we lived. They had huge quantities of a very few things. No way would you ever find even half of what was on the average person's grocery list. So a trip to Aldi meant another trip to the regular grocery store, and the whole thing ended up taking much longer. We decided it wasn't worth the extra time and gave up.

Trader Joe's is similar, but with the added negative feature of being more expensive, too. There are a few things I'll buy at Trader Joe's if I happen to be right near one with some extra time to kill. Their frozen mini quiches are excellent, for example. But they're far enough away (and expensive enough) that I don't plan regular trips there.
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Old 11-27-2011, 12:45 PM
postcards postcards is offline
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Originally Posted by Indygrrl View Post
And as an aside, why on earth do people think Trader Joe's is a health food store? I always call it my fancy snack store, and I haven't seen much of anything that looks super healthy to me. Unless they are talking about wine, haha.
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TJ's can be a health food option if you shop it that way. They have a lot of the same things at better prices - natural cereals, organic or non-organic fruit & veg, plenty of vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free ingredients and prepared foods, natural cleansers, vitamins and supplements, soy and almond milk, organic meats and dairy, etc.
And virtually nothing they sell has any artificial coloring or flavoring.
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Old 11-27-2011, 01:24 PM
KarlGrenze KarlGrenze is online now
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No Aldi around here. A trip to Trader Joe's is like a trip to Wal-Mart, don't go there often, but they have things others don't have. And at some of those things, they're quite cheap/comparatively priced.

For example, if I want tortellini, Trader Joe's is the cheapest place to get it around here. Kroger's is double the price, and I was not able to find it at the closest WalMart.
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Old 11-27-2011, 01:35 PM
I Love Me, Vol. I I Love Me, Vol. I is offline
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I rarely make the trip to Trader Joe's either, because I can't do all (or even most) of my shopping there. Where do you guys find /the extra time to go to these stores?
What are some of the things that you buy that they don't carry?

I do my 99% of my grocery shopping at TJs. It's less expensive than the big chains, with higher quality, healthier (less preservatives/unnecessary fillers, etc.), and better tasting food. The only thing they don't carry that I want is saltines.

As a side note: it never ceases to amaze me how much better healthier-looking and generally more attractive TJ shoppers are compared to shoppers at the big chain grocery stores. I would account for it (cynically) as the TJs shoppers being rich people who can afford professional trainers AND shopping at TJs... except that TJs is cheaper than any other grocery in town. I'll never understand why more of "the proletariat" don't shop there. My best guess is... 'cuz there's no Little Debbie, Pepsi, Doritos, or Krispy Kreme.
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Old 11-27-2011, 04:42 PM
RTFirefly RTFirefly is online now
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Originally Posted by Mrs. Cake View Post
TJ's can be a health food option if you shop it that way. They have a lot of the same things at better prices - natural cereals, organic or non-organic fruit & veg, plenty of vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free ingredients and prepared foods, natural cleansers, vitamins and supplements, soy and almond milk, organic meats and dairy, etc.
True. And for those of us who aren't into health food store fare, but just want to eat a healthier (and more interesting) version of a normal diet, TJ's makes it really easy.

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Originally Posted by OpalCat View Post
Trader Joe's is similar, but with the added negative feature of being more expensive, too.
Wow, Aldi's must be cheap indeed! Because IME, TJ's prices are pretty good - not Food Lion prices, but routinely cheaper than Giant and Safeway.

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Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
I've never been in either store and I have no idea where the nearest ones may be - my own fault for living in the boonies...
The nearest TJ's to you is in Annapolis. Since I'd never heard of Aldi's, I was surprised to find that it's in Bowie, Lanham, Oxon Hill, and Brandywine.
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:10 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
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Wow, Aldi's must be cheap indeed!
It can be insanely cheap. And the chocolate is good, if a bit Germanic.
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Old 11-27-2011, 07:42 PM
Eva Luna Eva Luna is offline
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What are some of the things that you buy that they don't carry?
I get much better prices on meat and produce, as well as far greater variety, at the other couple of places we typically do grocery shopping. They are never the cheapest place to buy spices, and they don't carry many of the ones we use regularly. I don't recall seeing dried beans or other legumes there (just canned ones, and not a huge variety of those, either). We generally cook from scratch; TJ's is great for convenience foods, but we don't buy many of those.
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Old 11-27-2011, 08:00 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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I get much better prices on meat and produce, as well as far greater variety, at the other couple of places we typically do grocery shopping. They are never the cheapest place to buy spices, and they don't carry many of the ones we use regularly. I don't recall seeing dried beans or other legumes there (just canned ones, and not a huge variety of those, either). We generally cook from scratch; TJ's is great for convenience foods, but we don't buy many of those.
Same here. I find TJ's terrible for getting all my usual cooking staples, but fine for picking up a couple of convenience foods and maybe a specialty item or two. The prices aren't bad at all, but I have a lot better selection of meat, fish, and veggies at my local supermarket than I do at TJ's.
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Old 11-27-2011, 08:36 PM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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TJ's is cheaper than Giant Eagle, OpalCat, and comparable to Marc's. In fact, since TJ's came to the Cleveland area I've noticed that Marc's has stepped up their "gourmet" selections to mimic some of the things I used to buy only at TJ's, like couscous and sun-dried tomatoes. Their cheese selection is amazingly well-priced...when I was searching for Gruyere a few years back, TJ's was half the price per pound of the only other stores that carried Gruyere at the time. As was their couscous. Oh, they don't have 17 varieties of couscous, but their olive oil is very well-priced, and they have a good selection of produce. Between Marc's and TJ's, I rarely buy anything at Giant Eagle anymore. I don't find Aldi's to have as good or as consistent a selection of produce, but for the basics they are just fine. I just don't go there much.
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Old 11-27-2011, 09:35 PM
Hyperelastic Hyperelastic is offline
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TJ's is cheaper than Giant Eagle, OpalCat, and comparable to Marc's. In fact, since TJ's came to the Cleveland area I've noticed that Marc's has stepped up their "gourmet" selections to mimic some of the things I used to buy only at TJ's, like couscous and sun-dried tomatoes. Their cheese selection is amazingly well-priced...when I was searching for Gruyere a few years back, TJ's was half the price per pound of the only other stores that carried Gruyere at the time. As was their couscous. Oh, they don't have 17 varieties of couscous, but their olive oil is very well-priced, and they have a good selection of produce. Between Marc's and TJ's, I rarely buy anything at Giant Eagle anymore. I don't find Aldi's to have as good or as consistent a selection of produce, but for the basics they are just fine. I just don't go there much.
A brand new Marc's opened nearby in a newly built building, but within a month it was like every other Marc's: it smelled funny, the floor was scuffed and stained, and all the stuff was caddy-whompus. How do they do that?

Aldi depresses me. I liked the prices, but it's like shopping in some kind of prison camp. I felt like I should have been paying in cigarettes.

TJ's has unbelievable prices on certain items, and it's a fun place to shop as long as it isn't too crowded. Their saffron is less than half of what I've ever seen saffron for anywhere else. And those chocolate-covered pretzels ar so good, they ought to be against the law.
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Old 11-27-2011, 09:52 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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I was afraid this thread would repeat the mistaken notion that they're "the same company," but Johnny L.A. has already explained that part.
I thought they were the same company. I also didn't know Aldi existed in the US.

Looking on Wikipedia, I'm confused. The Trader Joe's article Johnny L.A. quoted makes it sound like they are separate companies but with some ties in ownership. But the Aldi article is extremely confusing. The introduction to the article says that Aldi actually comprises two separate companies (Aldi Nord and Aldi Sud) operating in separate markets but "originally" owned and managed by same two people, brothers Karl and Theo Albrecht. It goes on to say that one of the brothers has retired and the other died, but says nothing about the current ownership of the company. It also says that
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In the United States, Aldi Nord is the parent company of the Trader Joe's niche food stores, while Aldi Süd operates the regular Aldi stores in the country.
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Old 11-27-2011, 10:53 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Looking on Wikipedia, I'm confused. The Trader Joe's article Johnny L.A. quoted makes it sound like they are separate companies but with some ties in ownership. But the Aldi article is extremely confusing. The introduction to the article says that Aldi actually comprises two separate companies (Aldi Nord and Aldi Sud) operating in separate markets but "originally" owned and managed by same two people, brothers Karl and Theo Albrecht. It goes on to say that one of the brothers has retired and the other died, but says nothing about the current ownership of the company.
Here is the link from the footnote on Wiki's Trader Joe's article [emphasis mine]:
Quote:
About all this 210-store U.S. chain shares with Germany's Aldi Group -- besides being owned by a trust created by Aldi co-founder Theo Albrecht -- is its rigorous control over costs.
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Old 11-28-2011, 01:25 AM
Martin Hyde Martin Hyde is offline
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It's a little more complicated than that, actually.

The Albrecht brothers that founded the Aldi chain were notoriously strange, reclusive, and downright weird. While I don't believe the full details have ever came out, it's my understanding that an irrevocable break in their relationship resulted in Aldi being split into two distinct entities (Aldi Nord/Süd.)

I'm assuming that the two stores while managed as totally separate entities had interlocking supplier agreements and things of that nature, because to my knowledge they offer the same products generally speaking (at least in areas where they operate in close geographic proximity.) The two brothers basically carved up market areas and agreed that each would manage their group within the boundaries of those areas, and they would not compete against one another.

Aldi Nord was Theo's share of the divided empire, and he got a larger share of the German market (about 2500 stores vs 1600 stores for Aldi Süd), and most of the large countries in Western continental Europe.

His brother Karl got a smaller share of Germany, and didn't get any of the big countries in continental Europe (Theo took Spain/France), but Karl got the U.K. and the U.S. markets. That's probably part of the reason Karl and Theo's wealth slowly diverged, with Karl becoming wealthier. When the split first happened Aldi's presence in the U.S. was minimal and maybe even non-existent (meaning I think they may have split prior to Aldi even opening a store here.) But now with 1100 stores in the U.S. it is behind only Germany in number of stores.

Where Trader Joe's comes in, is because of the division of markets the two groups (Nord/Sud) couldn't compete directly in the United States. So Theo Albrecht purchased Trader Joe's as a private individual (from TJ's American founder), and operated it ostensibly so that he could tap into the American market. Since Trader Joe's is infamously reclusive in its corporate affairs (mirroring the wealthy German billionaire that took it over as a small company and grew it to its present size) it's really hard to say how much operational interaction there is with Aldi Nord (the company Theo ran.) It's a privately owned enterprise so details about its operations are not going to be publicly available as they would be with a publicly traded company. Theo purchased TJ's in 1979, right around the same time his brother was opening stores in the United States, and I'm sure back then since he was running Aldi Nord there was a lot of overlap between management decisions concerning Aldi Nord and TJ's. Now that he's dead (and before that he had retired to my understanding) it's hard to say who has ultimate operational oversight. I guess whoever controls his trust, but there may be long standing institutional/organizational connections between Aldi Nord/TJs that persist to this day.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:13 AM
elmwood elmwood is offline
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Originally Posted by I Love Me, Vol. I View Post
As a side note: it never ceases to amaze me how much better healthier-looking and generally more attractive TJ shoppers are compared to shoppers at the big chain grocery stores. I would account for it (cynically) as the TJs shoppers being rich people who can afford professional trainers AND shopping at TJs... except that TJs is cheaper than any other grocery in town. I'll never understand why more of "the proletariat" don't shop there. My best guess is... 'cuz there's no Little Debbie, Pepsi, Doritos, or Krispy Kreme.
I'd chalk it up to the same factor that keeps the lumpenproletariat from stepping inside a Target store; the perception that prices are higher, and that the products sold are "too fancy" for their needs or tastes. TJ's stores are often located in upscale lifestyle centers, and mostly in higher-income communities. Geography is also a factor; consider the TJ's in the Cleveland area, located in Westlake and Woodmere, both in areas that are surrounded by miles of solidly upper-income neighborhoods. It's a long way to TJ's from Willowick and Newburgh Heights.

It's the same phenomenon with the Tops and Wegmans supermarket chains in upstate New York. Prices at the two stores are roughly about the same, but blue-collar and over-60 shoppers prefer Tops, while Wegmans has a cult following among the professional crowd and younger shoppers.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:33 AM
Living Well Is Best Revenge Living Well Is Best Revenge is offline
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The Aldi's in my area are gross. I would barely buy canned goods there, let alone meat.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:37 AM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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Originally Posted by I Love Me, Vol. I View Post
What are some of the things that you buy that they don't carry?
It's been a few years since I tried, so I honestly don't remember. I just remember being frustrated and having to stop at my regular grocery store on the way home for probably 1/3 of what was on my list.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:39 AM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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TJ's is cheaper than Giant Eagle, OpalCat, and comparable to Marc's. In fact, since TJ's came to the Cleveland area I've noticed that Marc's has stepped up their "gourmet" selections to mimic some of the things I used to buy only at TJ's, like couscous and sun-dried tomatoes. Their cheese selection is amazingly well-priced...when I was searching for Gruyere a few years back, TJ's was half the price per pound of the only other stores that carried Gruyere at the time. As was their couscous. Oh, they don't have 17 varieties of couscous, but their olive oil is very well-priced, and they have a good selection of produce. Between Marc's and TJ's, I rarely buy anything at Giant Eagle anymore. I don't find Aldi's to have as good or as consistent a selection of produce, but for the basics they are just fine. I just don't go there much.
They don't have Giant Eagle in the Boston suburbs.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:53 AM
elmwood elmwood is offline
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They don't have Giant Eagle in the Boston suburbs.
Giant Eagle is just a local/regionalsupermarket chain, like Hannaford, Big Y, or Stop & Shop in Massachusetts. It's not a specialty grocer like Whole Foods, Fresh Market, Sprouts and similar chains.

Last edited by elmwood; 11-28-2011 at 10:54 AM..
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  #37  
Old 11-28-2011, 11:02 AM
WilliamWilsonsDoppelgaenger WilliamWilsonsDoppelgaenger is offline
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I just wanted to say that in Germany, the Aldi stores (at least Aldi Nord) have an assortment of "Trader Joe's" products, like nuts and dried fruit, and they actually sell them under that label. I assume that in the United States they want to keep the brands separate to hold up a certain image of Trader Joe's, while in Germany they don't have to worry about that (no Trader Joe's stores here).
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Old 11-28-2011, 12:40 PM
elmwood elmwood is offline
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I just wanted to say that in Germany, the Aldi stores (at least Aldi Nord) have an assortment of "Trader Joe's" products, like nuts and dried fruit, and they actually sell them under that label.
Interesting!

In Gemany, do people debate what is the better Aldi, Nord or Sud?

"Well, we in the north have the Trader Joe's products at our Aldis, while you just have that Clancy's sheisse in the south."
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Old 11-28-2011, 12:46 PM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
Giant Eagle is just a local/regionalsupermarket chain, like Hannaford, Big Y, or Stop & Shop in Massachusetts. It's not a specialty grocer like Whole Foods, Fresh Market, Sprouts and similar chains.
Oh I know what they are--I used to live in Cleveland. I was assuming you somehow knew I lived in the Cleveland area and mistakenly thought I still lived there. I was just pointing out that they are no longer an option for me. What I've got available is Shaw's (slightly more expensive but good selection and a reasonably pleasant shopping experience), Market Basket (lower prices, but frequent problems finding things and also always totally mobbed with people. It's very hard to get through the aisles and the lines to check out are always really long, so it's a pain in the ass to shop there. And in the end there are always 2 or 3 things I can't find so I end up going to Shaw's anyway) and Stop 'n' Shop (there isn't one close to us so I almost never go there. They do have a cool system where you take a laser gun with you and scan things in as you put them in your cart, then just download the gun's memory into a thing at checkout and pay without ever dealing with a person, and without having to scan everything through at a self-checkout lane.)
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Old 11-28-2011, 02:58 PM
SmellMyWort SmellMyWort is online now
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Originally Posted by OpalCat View Post
It's been a few years since I tried, so I honestly don't remember. I just remember being frustrated and having to stop at my regular grocery store on the way home for probably 1/3 of what was on my list.
My impression is that they've kicked it up a notch over the last few years in terms of quality and selection. I'd consider giving them another shot.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:33 PM
WilliamWilsonsDoppelgaenger WilliamWilsonsDoppelgaenger is offline
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Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
In Gemany, do people debate what is the better Aldi, Nord or Sud?

"Well, we in the north have the Trader Joe's products at our Aldis, while you just have that Clancy's sheisse in the south."
Well, it happens . For example, I've heard enthusiastic reports from people in the south about the bread-baking machines they have now put up in the Aldi Süd stores (providing fresh, warm bread and rolls anytime). But I think overall, the products in the two chains are more or less interchangeable.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:38 PM
Hello Again Hello Again is online now
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Originally Posted by SmellMyWort View Post
My impression is that they've kicked it up a notch over the last few years in terms of quality and selection. I'd consider giving them another shot.
Sure, but TJ's is not, and does not purport to be, a full service grocery store.

You can do all your shopping there if you eat a lot of what they sell. If you don't - and in particular if you have affinity for ANY nationally branded product -- then you can't.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:48 PM
OpalCat OpalCat is offline
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Originally Posted by SmellMyWort View Post
My impression is that they've kicked it up a notch over the last few years in terms of quality and selection. I'd consider giving them another shot.
There aren't any convenient to where I live, so I probably won't have a chance.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:53 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is online now
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Save-a-Lot stores have one thing Aldi's doesn't have- a good selection of "no salt added" canned veggies and tomato products, including a decent ketchup.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:59 PM
Sattua Sattua is offline
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Just back from Aldi, where I went to get some La Vie. My store didn't have it. I bought some crackers. The first box I opened wasn't sealed.

I bought some of the dark chocolate too, and I admit it's very good. More snap than I like but not acid at all.
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Old 11-28-2011, 04:43 PM
guizot guizot is offline
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Do the two stores operate in the same area, or do they avoid that? As far as I know, there aren't any Aldis around here, about 10 miles from the first Trader Joe's.
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Old 11-28-2011, 05:05 PM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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There are both Aldi and Trader Joe's stores in the part of Southern Connecticut where my family lives, so they don't make an effort to avoid each other.

Last edited by Dewey Finn; 11-28-2011 at 05:06 PM..
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  #48  
Old 11-28-2011, 11:05 PM
kittenblue kittenblue is offline
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They don't have Giant Eagle in the Boston suburbs.
I was just using that as a reference for you since you used to live in the Cleveland area...extrapolate that over to whatever chain grocery store you currently have in your area.
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Old 11-29-2011, 06:31 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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There are both Aldi and Trader Joe's stores in the part of Southern Connecticut where my family lives, so they don't make an effort to avoid each other.
I live in the Chicago suburbs, and have at least two Aldi's and two TJ's within about 10 minutes drive of where I live. None are in the same suburb, though I expect there are some places where that happens.

Count me among those who don't like buying produce at TJ's or Aldi, though if you're picky you can find good things. After being burned repeatedly on mealy apples at TJ's, among other disappointments, we've mostly given up. It's possible it's a regional failing or they've improved since we stopped.

My personal best finds at TJ's: jarred kalamata olives (pitted), olive oil, jarred roasted red peppers, gnocchi, honey, goat cheese. Stuff I generally can't find there includes specialty flours (I'm a fan of wheat pastry flour and white whole-wheat flour), a wide selection of herbs and spices, brown basmati rice, dried beans and lentils, and other stuff that's not coming to mind right now.

Last edited by Ferret Herder; 11-29-2011 at 06:31 AM..
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Old 11-29-2011, 08:17 AM
Bloodless Turnip Bloodless Turnip is offline
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I love how I can compare toilet paper prices by the sheet at Aldi Scored $0.002 per sheet yesterday.

I also got 8 Roma tomatoes for $1.59.
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