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  #101  
Old 08-19-2016, 07:32 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Pit:
A hole in the ground
The stone found in a fruit
To strive one against another
  #102  
Old 08-20-2016, 08:15 AM
Bones Daley Bones Daley is offline
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Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
Actually this is a winner if you substitute "card game" with one of "Gin"'s other definitions.

"Gin" in the sense of a machine, like a cotton gin, is an abbreviation of the word "engine."

"Gin" in the sense of the drink is from the Dutch for "juniper," from which it is made. This is also the origin of the name of the card game, though.

"Gin" in the sense of "to excite or enliven" comes from ginger, which is one goes far back enough is derived from very old words for "Root."

All three came to be "gin" from totally different etymologies.
If we can accept Scots words, then "Gin" (pronounced with a hard "G"}, also means "if". Some may be familiar with the beautiful traditional Scottish song "O, Gin I Were a Baron's Heir" .
  #103  
Old 08-20-2016, 03:33 PM
boffking boffking is offline
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Are the various meanings of right from different sources?
1. A direction
2. Politically conservative
3. Freedom to do something- Right to vote
4. A type of whale
5. Correct
  #104  
Old 08-20-2016, 03:38 PM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Originally Posted by boffking View Post
Are the various meanings of right from different sources?
1. A direction
2. Politically conservative
3. Freedom to do something- Right to vote
4. A type of whale
5. Correct
To be nitpicky-annoying: I gather that (4) might be reckoned a subset of (5). The old-time whalers called the "right whale" by that name, because it was easier to catch and process, than other whale species -- thus, it was the correct / most advisable kind of whale to pursue.
  #105  
Old 08-20-2016, 04:11 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by Bones Daley View Post
Uhhh ... that sign, which proclaims the "Metallic Lathers Union", has nothing whatsoever to do with lathe operators. It has everything to do with the men who install metal LATH.

LATH / LATHE ... two totally different and unrelated words.

LATH (rhymes with "path") refers to the reinforcing substrate , which can be of wood or metal, onto which plaster or cement is applied. The person who install the lath is called a "lather" , which is pronounced with the "th" sounding the same as the "th" in "path", rather than the "th" in the foamy shaving cream.

A LATHE (rhymes with "faith" ) is a machine which can be used to produce round workpieces, and the person who operates it is called a turner.

I trust all is now clear.
Not even a from me, but a because a small intellectual but a major experiential supposition of mine for thirty years has been overturned a and a little at myself for repeating that memory of small intellectual supposition and my humorous and wise correction of it all that time.

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 08-20-2016 at 04:13 PM.
  #106  
Old 08-20-2016, 04:16 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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ETA: Jesus, now I learn I've been pronouncing "lathe" wrong my entire life ("th" like in "this").

Last edited by Leo Bloom; 08-20-2016 at 04:17 PM.
  #107  
Old 08-20-2016, 05:09 PM
Sangahyando Sangahyando is offline
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Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
ETA: Jesus, now I learn I've been pronouncing "lathe" wrong my entire life ("th" like in "this").
For what it's worth -- for my whole life, I've been pronouncing it the same. In the UK where I live, I've always heard the word pronounced with "th" as in "this" -- never, ever, to rhyme with "faith".
  #108  
Old 08-20-2016, 05:13 PM
Bones Daley Bones Daley is offline
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Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
ETA: Jesus, now I learn I've been pronouncing "lathe" wrong my entire life ("th" like in "this").
Easy there, Leo ... I don't think you have in fact been pronouncing it wrong ... my comparison with "faith" was more to indicate the vowel sound. The "th" is in fact pronounced like the "th" in "this".
  #109  
Old 08-22-2016, 10:47 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Originally Posted by boffking View Post
Are the various meanings of right from different sources?
1. A direction
2. Politically conservative
3. Freedom to do something- Right to vote
4. A type of whale
5. Correct
The political sense of left and right came from the hand/direction sense -- in IIRC a 18th century French political assembly, the conservatives sat on the physically right-hand side of the room.

And, apparently, the right hand was called that because it was the correct one, and the Bill of Rights sense of right also came from the root meaning more or less 'correct'.
  #110  
Old 08-22-2016, 11:00 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
A stake or pole embedded in your earlobe is not a distinct meaning from one embedded in the ground. And I suspect that the "assigned station" and "contribution to a message board" meanings are also related, the first via the hitching post and the second via the pins used to attach them to the cork.
I suspect that the meaning of a 'post' on the SDMB comes from 'to post' as in to make publicly known (particularly with a sign), which comes from the idea of putting up a sign on a pole or post in the ground.

However, it looks like military 'post' (which gives both hitching post and all the mail-related meanings) actually has a completely different derivation. So two unrelated meanings there.
  #111  
Old 08-22-2016, 11:14 AM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
I suspect that the meaning of a 'post' on the SDMB comes from 'to post' as in to make publicly known (particularly with a sign), which comes from the idea of putting up a sign on a pole or post in the ground.

However, it looks like military 'post' (which gives both hitching post and all the mail-related meanings) actually has a completely different derivation. So two unrelated meanings there.
How about the meaning of "post" as "subsequent"?

"American poetry post the 1950s hasn't had the same impact"
  #112  
Old 08-22-2016, 07:32 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Originally Posted by Bones Daley View Post
Easy there, Leo ... I don't think you have in fact been pronouncing it wrong ... my comparison with "faith" was more to indicate the vowel sound. The "th" is in fact pronounced like the "th" in "this".
Well, thank God for small favors.

I actually have had good relations with all my English teachers, and none have been either of my parents, who as far as I know didn't make me neurotic (about language, at least). So that can't be the reason I'm so gobsmacked about "lather."

And, as a friendly get-along American, it behoved me to use the unnatural word "gobsmacked."
  #113  
Old 08-23-2016, 08:34 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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As an aside, on Sunday my church sang a hymn which actually does place "lathe" as being a rhyme for "faith". Kind of funny, seeing it there in the book, when we'd just been discussing it here.
  #114  
Old 08-23-2016, 09:28 AM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
How about the meaning of "post" as "subsequent"?

"American poetry post the 1950s hasn't had the same impact"
Ooh, on-line sources seem to say that's direct from Latin ('post'='after'), so I think that's a third unrelated meaning.

We may have a winner!
  #115  
Old 08-23-2016, 03:29 PM
dtilque dtilque is online now
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Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
We may have a winner!
We've already had several "winners", although you have to pick them out from all the non-winners, which means looking up etymologies.

One is tick, which as I posted above, has 4 unrelated meanings. So the real winner should be the word with the most unrelated meanings. And by unrelated, I mean etymologically unrelated.
  #116  
Old 08-23-2016, 05:29 PM
Quercus Quercus is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Pit:
A hole in the ground
The stone found in a fruit
To strive one against another
I hope I keep doing this because I think it's interesting the way word meanings evolve, and not just because I enjoy crushing people's dreams, but to 'pit' one creature against another comes from a cock-fighting 'pit' or other hole where you throw in two animals to fight against each other.
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