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  #1  
Old 12-29-2011, 11:56 PM
brittekland brittekland is offline
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Strongest/Strangest Cheese You Ever Had

Every time I see people eating cheese with maggots in it (and their poo) on TV food shows, though I love all kinds of cheese, I just can't see myself eating the stuff ever, regardless of how great of cheese everyone might tell me or how unsophisticated I might come through as....

Would you eat or have you had any cheese with live maggots (or dead, I suppose) in them (they are supposedly extremely strong/ammoniated)? What are some of the strongest/strangest cheese you ever had?
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  #2  
Old 12-30-2011, 02:54 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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Strongest - not sure - I do like a strong cheese - my favourite is aged cheddar where it gets those little whey granules in it. I had a piece of vintage pecorino once that was so strong it made my face hurt.

Strangest I think would be some soya cheese substitute (for vegans) - it looked like a sort of crumbly orange cheshire, but it tasted like... earth
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:05 AM
wolfman wolfman is online now
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Head cheese isn't cheese at all, but mushed brains called cheese qualifies in my opinion anyway.
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Old 12-30-2011, 03:13 AM
brittekland brittekland is offline
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Originally Posted by wolfman View Post
Head cheese isn't cheese at all, but mushed brains called cheese qualifies in my opinion anyway.
Did I hear head cheese is making a comeback?
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  #5  
Old 12-30-2011, 03:36 AM
Ostrya Ostrya is offline
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I like several different kinds of cheeses but don't have any use for the stinky exotic ones. I don't even want to get near them.
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  #6  
Old 12-30-2011, 07:40 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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"SapSago" "Cheese"?

What do people do with this?
It is a small, green chunk of brick-like substance. You are supposed to grate it and use it to flavor other foods.
I did it-it was like sprinkling sawdust on your food.
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  #7  
Old 12-30-2011, 07:50 AM
Drain Bead Drain Bead is offline
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St. Albray. Looks like Camembert, tastes like spank socks.
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  #8  
Old 12-30-2011, 08:39 AM
Xema Xema is offline
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Epoisses is supposed to be among the most powerful-smelling of all cheeses. I didn't find it as strong as its reputation suggested - but the flavor is excellent.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:20 AM
silenus silenus is online now
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I'm very pedestrian in my cheese choices. The strongest I've ever eaten has been a nicely aged Stilton. With a nice port and a handful of walnuts......yum!
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  #10  
Old 12-30-2011, 12:43 PM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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All cheesy threads go in Cafe Society! From IMHO.
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  #11  
Old 12-30-2011, 01:00 PM
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The other night I was going to make something that I've had in a restaurant: Prunes stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped with bacon, then broiled. My mother had all of the ingredients except the goat cheese. Instead she had some cheese like substance that tasted like ass served in a dirty sock.

We had chicken soup instead.
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  #12  
Old 12-30-2011, 04:40 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
What do people do with this?
It is a small, green chunk of brick-like substance. You are supposed to grate it and use it to flavor other foods.
I did it-it was like sprinkling sawdust on your food.
Sap Sago is pretty good, in my book. A thick layer on a toasted english muffin with a lot of butter melted on it first brings out a rich, strong, somewhat nutty taste.

If it seemed flavorless to you, get your tastebuds checked. It's pretty strong.
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:42 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xema View Post
Epoisses is supposed to be among the most powerful-smelling of all cheeses. I didn't find it as strong as its reputation suggested - but the flavor is excellent.
I love a good Epoisses!

Sadly the last one I had was much to ammoniacal to finish; it had gone over.

That seems to be a common problem with the varieties found in the US.
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:45 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Liederkranz was recently re-invented. It's not quite as stinky as a good limburger, but it's pretty close.

Nice flavor, when you can get past the smell.
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  #15  
Old 12-30-2011, 04:56 PM
psychobunny psychobunny is offline
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Gorgonzola dolce.

If I had stopped to think about it I would have realized that there is a reson blue cheeses are not commonly used in desserts.
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  #16  
Old 12-30-2011, 10:24 PM
China Guy China Guy is offline
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I had yak cheese and goat cheese in a Tibetan monastary set in a cave about 5 hours hike from the nearest road, and the nearest road at that time was a 5 day drive from the nearest airport. The yak cheese was dried little pellets that had to be soaked in yak butter tea for "awhile" to soften up to something edible. It was ok but nothing special. The goat cheese, and I loves me some goat cheese, was sublime. It was by far the best goat cheese I've ever had in the feta tradition. Servered on beautifully baked buckwheat loafs. Man, that was simply awesome. I'm tempted to go back nearly 30 years later to see if they still have such great cheese.

Generally, the yak and goat cheese made my the Tibetan nomads is simply awesome (without being really strange).
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  #17  
Old 12-31-2011, 12:46 AM
Hazle Weatherfield Hazle Weatherfield is offline
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I LOVE cheese; even the stinky ones; however, Limburger is an atrocity! I sampled some once and I could not finish it. It tasted just like it smelled...dirty sock-ish. I'm really curious. Does anyone really like limburger?
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  #18  
Old 12-31-2011, 01:01 AM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfman View Post
Head cheese isn't cheese at all, but mushed brains called cheese qualifies in my opinion anyway.
Head cheese is not made with brains. The head of the animal is split, and the brains are discarded.
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  #19  
Old 12-31-2011, 01:22 AM
The Second Stone The Second Stone is offline
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I generally like stinky cheeses. But Limburger is just awful.

The best strong cheese I have ever had was Valdeon cheese from Spain. http://spanishfood.about.com/od/chee...ixedcheese.htm
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  #20  
Old 12-31-2011, 02:25 AM
Half Man Half Wit Half Man Half Wit is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xema View Post
Epoisses is supposed to be among the most powerful-smelling of all cheeses. I didn't find it as strong as its reputation suggested - but the flavor is excellent.
Oh, epoisses is my absolute favorite cheese! But the smell of it drives my girlfriend up the wall...

Speaking of which, her father prepared a concoction of Roquefort, cognac, raisins, and uh, some other things I forgot, that's just sublime, and of which I have now a jar in the fridge...
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  #21  
Old 12-31-2011, 02:50 AM
NDP NDP is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brittekland View Post
Every time I see people eating cheese with maggots in it (and their poo) on TV food shows, though I love all kinds of cheese, I just can't see myself eating the stuff ever, regardless of how great of cheese everyone might tell me or how unsophisticated I might come through as....

Would you eat or have you had any cheese with live maggots (or dead, I suppose) in them (they are supposedly extremely strong/ammoniated)?
The cheese in question is the Sardinian Casu marzu and is basically a vehicle for food poisoning. It was banned by the EU for a time but is allowed under the "traditional food" exception. I think Casu marzu might be banned from importation into the US but I'm not sure. Nonetheless, it's considered a delicacy even though its consumption seems more appropriate for a stunt on "Fear Factor" or "Jackass".
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  #22  
Old 12-31-2011, 06:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Liederkranz was recently re-invented. It's not quite as stinky as a good limburger, but it's pretty close.

Nice flavor, when you can get past the smell.
Aren't you the guy who has that huge pail of Vegemite?
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  #23  
Old 12-31-2011, 06:58 AM
Gagundathar Gagundathar is offline
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Originally Posted by NDP View Post
The cheese in question is the Sardinian Casu marzu and is basically a vehicle for food poisoning. It was banned by the EU for a time but is allowed under the "traditional food" exception. I think Casu marzu might be banned from importation into the US but I'm not sure. Nonetheless, it's considered a delicacy even though its consumption seems more appropriate for a stunt on "Fear Factor" or "Jackass".
OK, now THAT freaked me out.
I love cheese but that goes beyond the pale.
Egads, live larvae!
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  #24  
Old 12-31-2011, 07:33 AM
UFC Is Sux UFC Is Sux is offline
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Originally Posted by brittekland View Post
Every time I see people eating cheese with maggots in it (and their poo) on TV food shows, though I love all kinds of cheese, I just can't see myself eating the stuff ever, regardless of how great of cheese everyone might tell me or how unsophisticated I might come through as....

Would you eat or have you had any cheese with live maggots (or dead, I suppose) in them (they are supposedly extremely strong/ammoniated)?
Considering that maggot therapy for debridement of wounds on the human corpus is making a bit of a comeback these days, I don't find it outrageously strange that you might have to wipe them off as you consume cheese. Not that I ever would of course - the ick factor is just too high for me.
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  #25  
Old 12-31-2011, 09:14 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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I'm not eating any maggot cheese if I have a choice in the matter.

I like a good strong cheese like limburger or gorgonzola or an aged brie but nothing too unusual there.

I did have some chocolate cheese recently. I guess that counts as somewhat strange.
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  #26  
Old 12-31-2011, 11:15 AM
araminty araminty is offline
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I never found out the name of it, but I bought a well-wrapped wedge of soft cheese in a tiny Slovenian shop once, took it home, unwrapped it, wrapped it straight back up, took it outside, and threw it off a cliff into the sea. Wow. It smelled like petrol.
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  #27  
Old 12-31-2011, 12:55 PM
furryman furryman is offline
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The strongest cheeses I ever had were triple cream cheese and Roquefort. Way to strong for me.
I tried Limburger once. I didn't think it was all that smelly, maybe I got the wrong brand?
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  #28  
Old 12-31-2011, 03:22 PM
brittekland brittekland is offline
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Do you think humans, perhaps subconsciously, like toe jam odor? Sorry...
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  #29  
Old 12-31-2011, 07:02 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDP View Post
The cheese in question is the Sardinian Casu marzu....
A thread on the stuff, with a link to yet an earlier one: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=626911

Inspired by Wallace and Gromit, I special-ordered a small wedge of Stinking Bishop cheese one summer a few years back, and it was pretty stinky (and a major attraction to wasps in the area) but not all that pungent on the tongue.

Presented as a public service: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3KBuQHHKx0
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  #30  
Old 12-31-2011, 08:25 PM
PAUL S PAUL S is offline
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[QUOTE=Elendil's Heir;

Inspired by Wallace and Gromit, I special-ordered a small wedge of Stinking Bishop cheese one summer a few years back, and it was pretty stinky (and a major attraction to wasps in the area) but not all that pungent on the tongue.


Personally I've never found Stinking Bishop to have much of a pong. I think of it as resembling a ripe Camembert or Brie.

BTW, it takes its name "Stinking Bishop" from the variety of pear tree whence comes the perry in which it is steeped, not because of any strong smell.

Best wishes,
Paul
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  #31  
Old 12-31-2011, 10:48 PM
NDP NDP is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
A thread on the stuff, with a link to yet an earlier one: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=626911]
Incidentally, the fact this passage below is part of the Wikipedia article on casu marzu should tell you something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Larvae, if eaten alive (accidentally or otherwise), can pass through the digestive system alive (human stomach acids do not usually kill them) and live for some time in the intestines. This is referred to as an enteric myiasis. Fruit fly larvae are a leading cause of myiasis in humans, and are the insect most frequently found in the human intestine. The larvae can cause serious intestinal lesions as they attempt to bore through the intestinal walls. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, pain in the abdomen, and bloody diarrhea. Living and dead larvae may pass in the stool.
And you can't get this cheese in the U.S.? Damn government regulation is out of control!
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  #32  
Old 01-01-2012, 01:26 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Stilton is probably the worst I've had. I'm not big on cheese to start with, and any aged or "aromatic" cheese (especially blue cheeses" are right out.
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  #33  
Old 01-01-2012, 02:28 PM
Xema Xema is offline
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Stilton is probably the worst I've had.
You've led a sheltered life.

(Though I don't consider it intense, I loves me some good Stilton.)
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  #34  
Old 01-01-2012, 02:35 PM
Swords to Plowshares Swords to Plowshares is offline
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Probably a washed-rind cheese like Epoisses. Soft, salty, and very stinky.
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  #35  
Old 01-01-2012, 08:54 PM
Oslo Ostragoth Oslo Ostragoth is offline
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Limburger. Never again.
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  #36  
Old 01-01-2012, 09:31 PM
obfusciatrist obfusciatrist is offline
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Originally Posted by Xema View Post
Epoisses is supposed to be among the most powerful-smelling of all cheeses. I didn't find it as strong as its reputation suggested - but the flavor is excellent.
This was available at an NYE party I was at last night.

Taste wise it was wonderful. But in getting some to my plate I made the mistake of touching it. Five hours later, despite two handwashings and having touched plenty of other food with the same two fingers I recoiled any time my hand got too close to my nose. It is super strong smelling, but what smell is there is pretty funky. Worse, occasionally throughout the evening the smell would rise up the back of my throat for a repeat performance without the benefit of the great taste.

This morning, almost 12 hours after having touched it I could still smell it. Fortunately a shower finally got rid of it.
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  #37  
Old 01-01-2012, 09:36 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Gjetost is interesting. It's caramelized norwegian goat cream cheese. It's sort of sweet and kind of burny, but not in a capsaicin or horseradish way. More like mild battery acid. Or a 9 volt battery.

I like it. Usually.

Don't eat if if you've recently burned the roof of your mouth on hot pizza, though.
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  #38  
Old 01-02-2012, 09:14 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PAUL S
Personally I've never found Stinking Bishop to have much of a pong. I think of it as resembling a ripe Camembert or Brie.

BTW, it takes its name "Stinking Bishop" from the variety of pear tree whence comes the perry in which it is steeped, not because of any strong smell.

Best wishes,
Paul
Stinking Bishop is a rind-washed cheese - these do tend to emit a whiffy blast when they are first unwrapped, but the cheese itself is usually creamy and fairly mild.
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  #39  
Old 01-02-2012, 09:42 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Gjetost is interesting. It's caramelized norwegian goat cream cheese. It's sort of sweet and kind of burny, but not in a capsaicin or horseradish way. More like mild battery acid. Or a 9 volt battery.

I like it. Usually.

Don't eat if if you've recently burned the roof of your mouth on hot pizza, though.
Odd. It doesn't taste anything like that to me. It tastes like cheesy caramel--more like candy than like cheese. Or fudge. At least the Ski Queen brand does. All it is, basically, is boiled down whey (usually from goat milk or a mix of goat and other milk) until it caramelizes into a fudge-like consistency.

I love blue cheeses of all sorts, as well as camemberts and cheeses in that sort of stink category, so none of those are going to ping my stink-o-meter. However, the Hungarian Palpusztai cheese is in the Limburger family, and that's one I haven't quite gotten used to yet. That's the most revolting cheese I've ever had, although I only had it once, and it's been at least ten years, so it's possible my tastes have changed.
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  #40  
Old 01-02-2012, 11:09 AM
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Roquefort is pretty strong. Not too horrible, but overwhelming for me, like blue cheese on steroids.

Stinkiest cheese I ever smelled was in Spain. I was at a friend's house, and when we entered her bedroom a terrible smell of unwashed feet hit me. I didn't want to say anything for fear of embarrassing my friend about her personal hygiene habits, but then I discovered that the smell was actually coming from a wedge of hard Spanish cheese she had left on her desk.

Worst cheese I ever had was some sort of vegan nut cheese abomination at a vegan cafe another friend dragged me to. I can't even describe what it tasted like. I don't know if this has ever happened to anybody else, but I had actual sensory flashbacks where my mouth would suddenly taste the cheese again days later.
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  #41  
Old 01-02-2012, 11:18 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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Originally Posted by Xema View Post
You've led a sheltered life.
the smell of it makes me want to gag, and putting any in my mouth makes me actually gag. It's quite an incentive to avoid any other "strong" cheeses.

Quote:
(Though I don't consider it intense, I loves me some good Stilton.)
you can have it.
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  #42  
Old 01-02-2012, 11:21 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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We had some very tasty yak cheese in Kathmandu. Liked it so much that we brought a load home with us.
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  #43  
Old 01-08-2012, 05:03 AM
flodnak flodnak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
Gjetost is interesting. It's caramelized norwegian goat cream cheese. It's sort of sweet and kind of burny, but not in a capsaicin or horseradish way. More like mild battery acid. Or a 9 volt battery.
I definitely agree with pulykamell here - to me it tastes sweet and quite mild.

However, do NOT eat it if you have a canker sore in your mouth. It has the ability to hunt out those sores and stick to them. Also, if you drop it on the floor, pick it up before it dries. The Norwegian road authorities are considering using this stuff to fix potholes.
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  #44  
Old 01-08-2012, 06:19 AM
JustinC JustinC is offline
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I tried some camel cheese in Saudi - dry, bitter, salty and crumbly plus you can't have a glass of red with it so I'll not be looking out for it in future.
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  #45  
Old 01-08-2012, 06:42 AM
brittekland brittekland is offline
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Originally Posted by flodnak View Post
I definitely agree with pulykamell here - to me it tastes sweet and quite mild.

However, do NOT eat it if you have a canker sore in your mouth. It has the ability to hunt out those sores and stick to them. Also, if you drop it on the floor, pick it up before it dries. The Norwegian road authorities are considering using this stuff to fix potholes.
Mahbe here we have a new energy source and a compound that would supersede epoxy? Advantage would be tis edible...
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