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  #1  
Old 01-03-2012, 07:01 AM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
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'American Pickers' question

Jeepers, I'm turning into my Mom. She'd leave HGTV on all the time as background noise, I leave on the History channel and its plethora of antique/pawn shop 'I'll give you half the price you're asking' shows.

So, on American Pickers last night, the skinny guy took a fancy to a car made from a WWII aircraft belly tank. He worked out a deal for somewhere north of 12 grand, IIRC and the next scene has him attempting to load the vehicle into his van. The question is, how did he pay for it? These guys were hundreds of miles from home; if they are routinely riding around, in a freakin' van, with tens of thousands of dollars in cash, that doesn't seem very safe (even, or maybe especially, with a video crew as part of the entourage), and I wouldn't think a cashier's check could be had in that short an amount of time. My guess is they came back a few days later, with a cashier's check, and edited that part out. Or maybe the producers actually pay, by some reasonably secure means. Any ideas?

Oh, and their 'busting' the bearded guy in Sturgis in the same ep screamed 'Staged!' to me.

Last edited by El_Kabong; 01-03-2012 at 07:03 AM..
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  #2  
Old 01-03-2012, 07:06 AM
StGermain StGermain is offline
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Mike and Frank always seem to pay in cash. If your job is to go around buying things, it seems like you'd get used to carrying a load of cash.

StG
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Old 01-03-2012, 07:44 AM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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Originally Posted by El_Kabong View Post
Oh, and their 'busting' the bearded guy in Sturgis in the same ep screamed 'Staged!' to me.
It was totally staged. My husband and I called it 10 minutes into the show. "Hey, do you think they'll all meet up in Sturgis?" We were at the end. Sure, we know just what bar they'll all be in!
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:11 AM
phungi phungi is offline
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My question about this show is:

How do they make enough money to pay for their gas and lodging? The "big item" is often a few hundred dollars, with a rare find in the thousands. I know all these $20-$150 profits add up, but damn, they sure seem to be treading water financially.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:18 AM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Originally Posted by phungi View Post
My question about this show is:

How do they make enough money to pay for their gas and lodging? The "big item" is often a few hundred dollars, with a rare find in the thousands. I know all these $20-$150 profits add up, but damn, they sure seem to be treading water financially.
History Channel is paying the bills. I'm sure they scout locations too. There's no way the producers really leave it to the girl.
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:49 AM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
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Originally Posted by phungi View Post
My question about this show is:

How do they make enough money to pay for their gas and lodging? The "big item" is often a few hundred dollars, with a rare find in the thousands. I know all these $20-$150 profits add up, but damn, they sure seem to be treading water financially.
Good point. I know they always close the show with an estimate of what the return on the picked items will be, but I don't recall ever seeing them making an actual sale, and thus, whether the estimate was correct.

Pretty much the same for Pawn Stars, come to that.
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:20 PM
Suburban Plankton Suburban Plankton is offline
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Originally Posted by El_Kabong View Post
Good point. I know they always close the show with an estimate of what the return on the picked items will be, but I don't recall ever seeing them making an actual sale, and thus, whether the estimate was correct.

Pretty much the same for Pawn Stars, come to that.
Every once in a while they do show an item as "Sold" during the close, but in general you're correct.

I imagine the reality of the situation is a combination of:

a) they have a successful business beyond what is seen on the show (the boring stuff makes all the money but is never shown because it's...well, boring), and

b) the History Channel is providing a nice income supplement
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Old 01-03-2012, 01:37 PM
markm markm is offline
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Every once in a while they do show an item as "Sold" during the close, but in general you're correct.

I imagine the reality of the situation is a combination of:

a) they have a successful business beyond what is seen on the show (the boring stuff makes all the money but is never shown because it's...well, boring), and

b) the History Channel is providing a nice income supplement
Which begs the question: How did History Channel decide to make a show about a couple of antique collectors from podunk Iowa?
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Old 01-03-2012, 02:07 PM
GrandWino GrandWino is offline
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I've been to their actual store in Le Claire, IA a few times (and have met Danielle, who is quite a sweetheart IRL) and the entire place is pretty much just a showroom with "NOT FOR SALE" posted on anything interesting. They now seem to make most of their retail money by selling logo'd t-shirts, hats, or whatnot.

History Channel's contracts with each of the guys must be in the 6-figures by now, given what I've heard of other reality show contracts (eg: one of the Teen Mom's on MTV made around $300k for her run on the show).
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Old 01-03-2012, 03:17 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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They just opened a second store in Nashville, one that I'm guessing was funded in part by the History Channel's cash infusion.
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Old 01-03-2012, 03:39 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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How did History Channel decide to make a show about a couple of antique collectors from podunk Iowa?
They had a stroke of genius.
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2012, 04:32 PM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
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Originally Posted by Bob Ducca View Post
I've been to their actual store in Le Claire, IA a few times (and have met Danielle, who is quite a sweetheart IRL) and the entire place is pretty much just a showroom with "NOT FOR SALE" posted on anything interesting. They now seem to make most of their retail money by selling logo'd t-shirts, hats, or whatnot.
Hmm. Maybe they are selling most of their 'picks' at auction.
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  #13  
Old 01-03-2012, 05:40 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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IIRC in the first or second episode the picker guys mentioned that they had just opened that store Danielle hangs out in. Danielle was a very recent hire.

I think all that was done just for the show. Before that they probably had some old ratty buildings to store the stuff in before selling it privately or at auction.

Last edited by aceplace57; 01-03-2012 at 05:41 PM..
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  #14  
Old 01-03-2012, 05:56 PM
interface2x interface2x is offline
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IIRC in the first or second episode the picker guys mentioned that they had just opened that store Danielle hangs out in. Danielle was a very recent hire.
From what I understand, they hired her just for the show - to get a more youthful appearance so that it isn't just two middle aged guys talking to old guys.

I also went to their store in LeClaire and I was pretty unimpressed - it was just a converted auto garage with very little in it. When I was there, they were selling shirts and hats hand over fist and the girl working (whom I had never seen but then I don't really watch the show) was on the phone with one of the guys about an offer someone had made on one of the antiques.
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Old 01-03-2012, 06:15 PM
justrob justrob is offline
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Which begs the question: How did History Channel decide to make a show about a couple of antique collectors from podunk Iowa?
When I first saw it I looked up some stuff on Youtube and it seemed like Mike had been pitching the show to people. The History channel is obviously the one that bit.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2012, 06:23 PM
Stink Fish Pot Stink Fish Pot is offline
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It was totally staged. My husband and I called it 10 minutes into the show. "Hey, do you think they'll all meet up in Sturgis?" We were at the end. Sure, we know just what bar they'll all be in!
This is one of the reasons I've stopped watching Pickers.

All of these "reality" shows seem very staged to me.

Pickers would never be able to find all of these places, travel to them, get the stuff back to a shop and sell the stuff without the help of the producers. The producers have to scout all the locations to make sure they are suitable for filming, they always find some great stuff, and they always get people to sell. Anyone that has any experience with folks who hoard and collect stuff over decades knows they have a hard time parting with anything.

Storage Wars are also a joke. Think about it. The lockers are going on the auction block, right? So what would keep the owner of the storage facility from breaking the lock and cherry picking anything worth anything. Those two guys always find a great storage unit, and there is just no way. I call "bullshit" on this show, too.

Yeah, I run a storage facility, some guy doesn't pay his bill for a year, and I am finally permitted by law to empty out the space by putting it up for auction. I'd NEVER open it up to see the 65 Mustang convertible sitting there. Please.

As for Pawn Stars, I don't even know what to do with that show. The father looks to be playing with 28 cards, and Chumley? That's a joke, right?
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:13 PM
themachinist themachinist is offline
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American Pickers

I just watched "The Big Wheel" that the belly tank cyclecar was supposed to be used in, didn't see it. If this was used in a movie I'd like to see pictures from that movie.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:25 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
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(and have met Danielle, who is quite a sweetheart IRL)
I don't normally like tattoos but I will deign to make an exception with her.
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Old 01-03-2012, 09:26 PM
joebuck20 joebuck20 is offline
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Storage Wars are also a joke. Think about it. The lockers are going on the auction block, right? So what would keep the owner of the storage facility from breaking the lock and cherry picking anything worth anything. Those two guys always find a great storage unit, and there is just no way. I call "bullshit" on this show, too.
I imagine if you're late on a payment, the storage facility just puts their lock on the unit or otherwise keeps you from accessing it.
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:32 PM
dropzone dropzone is offline
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Dropmom used to pick us up after school and take us antiquing in the foothills of the Blue Ridge in the early 60s. I love Antiques Roadshow. It tends to be a little rich for my blood, but I can play the game fairly well. OTOH, American Pickers has me arguing with the TV as if it were a football game (for my blood pressure I never watch football), except over a buck or five here and there. It's fun. These are my peeps and I wish they showed the final sales so I could see them destroyed, but they have a handle on their market. Which used to include my mother, but even she knows what I mean when I make an extravagant eye roll, lift my hands Heavenward, and ask, "Why did you make this poor woman so stupid?"
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Old 01-04-2012, 12:41 AM
Stink Fish Pot Stink Fish Pot is offline
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I imagine if you're late on a payment, the storage facility just puts their lock on the unit or otherwise keeps you from accessing it.
I guess, but eventually, they have a right to reclaim their space. And selling the contents at auction probably happen.

But an owner is not going to put something up for auction without checking the unit out himself. They'd actually leave coin collections? Motorcycles? guns? or antique anything?

And imagine if you were there bidding against these two bozos... if you saw the show, you are probably going to bid on what they are bidding on.
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Old 01-04-2012, 08:17 AM
interface2x interface2x is offline
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But an owner is not going to put something up for auction without checking the unit out himself. They'd actually leave coin collections? Motorcycles? guns? or antique anything?
Well, generally, if every time anyone goes to buy a storage locker it's picked over and there's nothing of value, then no one will ever buy a storage locker. Sure, you might not get the total value of the locker (though in order to do that, you need to do the leg work to actually sell the stuff) but you can also sell crap units for far more than they're worth. It's probably more profitable in the long run for the owners to sell as-is and let people bid each other up. My guess is that the vast majority of these units has almost nothing of significant monetary value, results of the show notwithstanding.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:36 AM
aktep aktep is offline
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Storage Wars are also a joke. Think about it. The lockers are going on the auction block, right? So what would keep the owner of the storage facility from breaking the lock and cherry picking anything worth anything. Those two guys always find a great storage unit, and there is just no way. I call "bullshit" on this show, too.
There's certainly a bit of theatre to the show, they don't show units the cast doesn't win, and the cutting room floor is probably full of days they went to auction, didn't find anything interesting, but didn't blow $2000 on a locker full of dirty underwear, either.

There's a whole mess of law issues that prevent the owner from just cleaning out the space. The occupant of the unit has a right to reclaim his property by satisfying the lien before the sale. If he shows up and his stuff is gone, there's going to be an issue. The occupant is also entitled to the proceeds of the sale in excess of the lien and costs of sale. The storage unit facility owner does not get to keep the money, so it is not worth their time to pick through the units to sell valuable items to satisfy the lien. The owner just wants the back rent paid and the unit emptied so it can be rented again.

The "cut-the-lock-and-everyone-is-surprised" thing is a bit of TV theatre, too. The owner has already denied access to the occupant and replaced the lock on the unit, so I presume the key is probably on the premises somewhere. Most state laws (including CA and TX, where the two SW series are filmed) require the notice of sale to include a listing of the items in the locker (it usually says something like "boxes, clothes, furniture, toys" or "machinery, tools, computers, appliances") and certain items can't just be sold away at auction, so clearly the owner has to take at least a cursory glance at the units before the sale. There was an episode where there was a car or something in one of the units, and the moment the unit was opened, the auctioneers said something like "remember, the car is not for sale as part of the auction", and it did not seem like it was surprise to anyone.
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Old 01-04-2012, 12:00 PM
Stink Fish Pot Stink Fish Pot is offline
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aktep, and interface2x, you both make good points.

I don't know the laws regarding the sale of these rooms, but I clearly have less faith in mankind in general when it comes to money. They might not empty the unit out, but I still think they would take out their "fair share" of anything of value.

If not, I'd have a partner in the audience buying the units that had something good in them.

If nothing else, I bet there are a lot of people going to the storage unit auctions that never went before. And with the cameras around with the stars of storage wars bidding, I'm guessing they'd have to pay a premium for any lot they bid on. Unless, of course , the whole thing is a sham, with everyone participating being a paid actor.

This would make the most sense, since the producers can control the entire scene, from who wins what, what is found in the unit, etc. It's just entertainment, after all.
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  #25  
Old 01-04-2012, 12:34 PM
markm markm is offline
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I can handle the staged nature of American Pickers (haven't watched SW or similar) because, while it's staged, it's not too overplayed. Would he have sneaked off to Sturgis without them knowing? Of course not. Were they planning on going to Sturgis after the pick, anyway? Probably (where better to try to unload the cyclecar than in biker central?) They had to fill out time somehow, so they do the cutesy meet-up thing instead of just, "Okay, we're on our way."
It's the shows where there is constant friction and manufactured drama that I can't stand. AP at least doesn't have that. There's no yelling, no screaming, no throwing things. I like that.
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Old 01-04-2012, 12:44 PM
joebuck20 joebuck20 is offline
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But an owner is not going to put something up for auction without checking the unit out himself. They'd actually leave coin collections? Motorcycles? guns? or antique anything?
Well, generally, if every time anyone goes to buy a storage locker it's picked over and there's nothing of value, then no one will ever buy a storage locker. Sure, you might not get the total value of the locker (though in order to do that, you need to do the leg work to actually sell the stuff) but you can also sell crap units for far more than they're worth. It's probably more profitable in the long run for the owners to sell as-is and let people bid each other up. My guess is that the vast majority of these units has almost nothing of significant monetary value, results of the show notwithstanding.

This. Contrary to what the shows may portray, 90 percent of these lockers have little or nothing of value in them and are just filled with junk, so it's not worth it for the owner of the storage facility to search them. They may take a cursory glance, but even if they happen to see something valuable, they'd still have to do the legwork to unload it and as aktep mentioned, they're only entitled to the amount of the lien anyway. So in the long run, the auction route probably makes most sense. Little legwork for the owners while allowing them to get at least a few bucks for what could very likely turn out to be a bunch of crap.

Last edited by joebuck20; 01-04-2012 at 12:45 PM..
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  #27  
Old 01-04-2012, 01:05 PM
Sigmagirl Sigmagirl is offline
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It's the shows where there is constant friction and manufactured drama that I can't stand. AP at least doesn't have that. There's no yelling, no screaming, no throwing things. I like that.
Good point. I will not tolerate shows like the custom cycle one with the testosterone-dripping mustached father and his weaselly son (you don't have to remind me of the name; I've deliberately forgotten it). I lived more than half my life with screaming insanity like that and now I should pay the cable company to bring it back into my living room? I am not lying when I think those shows helped in my diagnosis of PTSD.

A couple of guys driving around buying stuff, I can take it being staged if they're pleasant, and Frank and Mike (I can't stop thinking of them as Frank and Joe!) are pleasant enough.
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:05 PM
Lobohan Lobohan is online now
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aktep, and interface2x, you both make good points.

I don't know the laws regarding the sale of these rooms, but I clearly have less faith in mankind in general when it comes to money. They might not empty the unit out, but I still think they would take out their "fair share" of anything of value.

If not, I'd have a partner in the audience buying the units that had something good in them.

If nothing else, I bet there are a lot of people going to the storage unit auctions that never went before. And with the cameras around with the stars of storage wars bidding, I'm guessing they'd have to pay a premium for any lot they bid on. Unless, of course , the whole thing is a sham, with everyone participating being a paid actor.

This would make the most sense, since the producers can control the entire scene, from who wins what, what is found in the unit, etc. It's just entertainment, after all.
I've actually been to a few auctions, because I work freelance and occasionally have days with nothing to do. My understanding of the law is that the unit renter owns the stuff in there until it is sold at public auction. The storage facility owner is prohibited by law from taking anything out. And generally the renter has until the day of the auction to get his stuff back. So if the storage unit owner were going to steal stuff he'd have to do it quick.

I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but most owners aren't going to go though the effort.
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  #29  
Old 01-04-2012, 02:24 PM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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The editing of the timeline on the Sturgis episode of American Pickers was a little weird. They start out in eastern Iowa, go west to Hurley, SD (which is fine) then go further west to the 1880 town (which is still fine) then back east to Murdo and then back west to Sturgis. Also, all the towns they visited, except for Hurley, are on I-90 and when they showed the overhead road shots, they didn't look anything like I-90, at least not the portion in South Dakota. Not to mention, when they showed him calling the motorcycle expert, he was on some gravel back road. Why not pull in to a rest area or something.

Last edited by Kimballkid; 01-04-2012 at 02:25 PM.. Reason: Additional thoughts
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Old 01-04-2012, 02:27 PM
markm markm is offline
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The editing of the timeline on the Sturgis episode of American Pickers was a little weird. They start out in eastern Iowa, go west to Hurley, SD (which is fine) then go further west to the 1880 town (which is still fine) then back east to Murdo and then back west to Sturgis. Also, all the towns they visited, except for Hurley, are on I-90 and when they showed the overhead road shots, they didn't look anything like I-90, at least not the portion in South Dakota. Not to mention, when they showed him calling the motorcycle expert, he was on some gravel back road. Why not pull in to a rest area or something.
Maybe they were avoiding I-90 and taking back roads to look for cold picks?
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Old 01-04-2012, 04:37 PM
EddyTeddyFreddy EddyTeddyFreddy is offline
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What I wonder about, on American Pickers/Storage Wars/Auction Hunters/Pawn Stars, is who's paying for all those professional appraisals? Either the show stars go to the expert's place (usually so on AP/SW/AH) or the expert comes in (usually so on PS), the item is looked over, assessed for authenticity, condition, etc., and a value in most cases is put on it. Occasionally the expert is invited to buy the item; often his/her role ends with the appraisal.

Now, people who perform that kind of appraisal generally don't do it for free; it's part of their livelihood to provide such services. I have to believe that a reasonable fee for their time would often consume more of the item's value than the show star could afford as a cost of acquisition and still turn a profit. So who pays?

I'm cross-posting this in the Storage Wars vs. Auction Hunters thread, by the way.
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:19 PM
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I've always wondering the same thing about the appraisers. Yeah, it's probably the TV show in these cases, but the shop was around and operating before they were picked up as a show.

I have a question about American Pickers though- have they ever hinted at how they share profit and spread loss? It always seems like Frank or Mike go bonkers individually over a great "pick", or on the other hand, laugh at what they think is a dumb purchase. And sometimes, it's not a matter of one guy wants it and the other doesn't care- it's a matter or who actually stumbles across the item. So do we have any idea of how they actual structure their partnership? Yeah, probably unlikely, but worth asking.
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:23 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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One possible payment to the appraisers could be the exposure alone. I'll bet those dudes get a lot of calls from people who see them on TV and want their (paid) services.

The shows take considerable care identifying the appraisers. I don't think they'd be hard to find if you needed one.
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:54 PM
MikeG MikeG is offline
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What I find odd is the degree of separation between Mike and Franks' web pages. Nary a mention of the other. Not much for sale either, you'd think they would use the exposure to move product.
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  #35  
Old 01-05-2012, 03:21 PM
Stink Fish Pot Stink Fish Pot is offline
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What I find odd is the degree of separation between Mike and Franks' web pages. Nary a mention of the other. Not much for sale either, you'd think they would use the exposure to move product.
Interesting... unless they are just either a couple of actors, or two independent "pickers" brought together for the show.

They don't seem particularly close. So the question of how they manage profits and losses is also a good one. I would think that if you were going into this kind of a business, with a partner, you'd want to be with someone you'd trust... and part of that trust would be their picking ability. To split the costs and profits would make the most sense.

Appraisers are another interesting topic. I remember a while ago the appraisers on antique roadshow were nailed for lowballing people on their item and then buying the stuff to sell at a huge profit in their shops. Bastards. You can't trust anybody!
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  #36  
Old 01-05-2012, 03:57 PM
GrandWino GrandWino is offline
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Appraisers are another interesting topic. I remember a while ago the appraisers on antique roadshow were nailed for lowballing people on their item and then buying the stuff to sell at a huge profit in their shops. Bastards. You can't trust anybody!
If you sell your item to the same person that appraised it, you deserve to get ripped off.
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  #37  
Old 01-05-2012, 04:01 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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If you sell your item to the same person that appraised it, you deserve to get ripped off.
But isn't that what the Pawn Stars' customers are doing? Unless it's an unusual item, the "appraisers" are also the buyers; they don't call in outside help for everything. The only protection a seller has is the honesty of the proprietors and a little common sense.
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Old 01-05-2012, 04:09 PM
GrandWino GrandWino is offline
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But isn't that what the Pawn Stars' customers are doing? Unless it's an unusual item, the "appraisers" are also the buyers; they don't call in outside help for everything. The only protection a seller has is the honesty of the proprietors and a little common sense.
Sure... and my point stands. And if you're taking your stuff to a pawn shop in Vegas, you should probably expect to get hosed.... but that next roll of the dice is going to make it all better. Momma needs a new pair of shoes!
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  #39  
Old 01-05-2012, 04:24 PM
filmore filmore is offline
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I can't remember where I saw it, but someone who owned storage lockers described how they are sold of. They must be sold in a public auction. It is the law. He can't just decide to keep the stuff and not auction it off. Before it goes to auction, he goes in and inventories the locker. He doesn't look in all the boxes or anything. He'll just write down what he sees by walking around in the locker. He said he could steal stuff, but that would cause problems if the owner ever tried to claim his stuff back. And he wouldn't have people attending his auctions because they would know that his site only had junk lockers.

As for Storage Wars, that is somewhat contrived. What I think happens is that producers go out and buy lockers at the real public auctions. Once they have a few good lockers, they bring the cast in with a bunch of extras at a later date. The auctions they show are not the true public auctions. They are filming the fake auction of the units they bought earlier. I sometimes wonder if the producers sprinkle a few collectibles in the units themselves. The extras are told to make a few bids until the price gets up to a certain value, after which only the cast will be making the bids. I don't think the cast knows what's in the lockers beforehand. They do seem genuinely surprised when the items are revealed. I'm not sure if the cast uses their own money or not. I recall someone saying they went to Jerrod's store and saw some of the items from the show, but there were signs on them saying not-for-sale. When he asked about it, they said the producers owned those items. That may indicate that the cast is bidding with the show's money.
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Old 01-05-2012, 08:11 PM
Becky2844 Becky2844 is offline
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Originally Posted by interface2x View Post
From what I understand, they hired her just for the show - to get a more youthful appearance so that it isn't just two middle aged guys talking to old guys.

I also went to their store in LeClaire and I was pretty unimpressed - it was just a converted auto garage with very little in it. When I was there, they were selling shirts and hats hand over fist and the girl working (whom I had never seen but then I don't really watch the show) was on the phone with one of the guys about an offer someone had made on one of the antiques.
(Clutching my chest and staggering backward.) You think they look middle aged? Now I'm looking behind me for the edge of my grave.

So far my favorite is hippie guy, with the bicycles hanging in the trees.
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Old 01-05-2012, 08:12 PM
Stink Fish Pot Stink Fish Pot is offline
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Originally Posted by filmore View Post
As for Storage Wars, that is somewhat contrived. What I think happens is that producers go out and buy lockers at the real public auctions. Once they have a few good lockers, they bring the cast in with a bunch of extras at a later date. The auctions they show are not the true public auctions. They are filming the fake auction of the units they bought earlier. I sometimes wonder if the producers sprinkle a few collectibles in the units themselves. The extras are told to make a few bids until the price gets up to a certain value, after which only the cast will be making the bids. I don't think the cast knows what's in the lockers beforehand. They do seem genuinely surprised when the items are revealed. I'm not sure if the cast uses their own money or not. I recall someone saying they went to Jerrod's store and saw some of the items from the show, but there were signs on them saying not-for-sale. When he asked about it, they said the producers owned those items. That may indicate that the cast is bidding with the show's money.
Thanks for your post. I appreciate the POV of an actual storage facilities owner,so if that's what you were told, it certainly gives it credibility. But I'm still a skeptic. I guess if I found out the owners skimmed a coin collection or something I wouldn't be shocked.

As for your idea on how these shows are run, I like it. Like I mentioned before, they would more than likely have to control every part of the auction, so buying the unit and then bringing in actors to bid is a good idea.
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  #42  
Old 01-05-2012, 09:50 PM
Mewl Dear Mewl Dear is offline
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Danielle used to work in burlesgue. Of course she was brought in for ratings.
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  #43  
Old 01-06-2012, 08:22 AM
interface2x interface2x is offline
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(Clutching my chest and staggering backward.) You think they look middle aged? Now I'm looking behind me for the edge of my grave.
Heh, that's what they said!
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Old 01-06-2012, 09:32 AM
Jophiel Jophiel is offline
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Good point. I know they always close the show with an estimate of what the return on the picked items will be, but I don't recall ever seeing them making an actual sale, and thus, whether the estimate was correct.

Pretty much the same for Pawn Stars, come to that.
For Pawn stars, I assume the bread and butter of the shop is more standard stuff. Maybe not old VCRs but they often show people looking over a selection of gold rings, etc during the bumper shots. They just don't bother showing someone selling their wedding band, guitar or Grandma's silverware because that's not "historical" television.
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:29 AM
Silver Tyger Silver Tyger is offline
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For Pawn stars, I assume the bread and butter of the shop is more standard stuff. Maybe not old VCRs but they often show people looking over a selection of gold rings, etc during the bumper shots. They just don't bother showing someone selling their wedding band, guitar or Grandma's silverware because that's not "historical" television.
They've said (early in the show - I don't know that it's still true) that they had regular pawners. We've seen people pawn things once or twice, but it's probably just not as exciting. Apparently their shop focuses more on antiques and collectibles than standard pawn fare, because there are so many pawn shops in Las Vegas. And the last episode I watched, we saw some of the stuff the night shift guy had bought as Rick was going through it. It was mostly jewelry and some other unexciting things.
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  #46  
Old 01-06-2012, 01:17 PM
Palooka Palooka is offline
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Buddy said in some NPR interview that the people who pawn stuff don't like being on television.
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Old 01-06-2012, 02:01 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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I've noticed Mike refers to both stores as his store. Note the description for the new Nashville store.
http://antiquearchaeology.com/antiqu...hville_tn.html

I don't think Frank is a partner at all. He joins up with Mike and goes picking but I don't think they are business partners. I've noticed each guy seems to use his own cash to buy stuff.

Kind of like the Mythbusters. Jamie owns the business and Adam just worked for him occasionally.

Last edited by aceplace57; 01-06-2012 at 02:04 PM..
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  #48  
Old 01-06-2012, 02:16 PM
markm markm is offline
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Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I've noticed Mike refers to both stores as his store. Note the description for the new Nashville store.
http://antiquearchaeology.com/antiqu...hville_tn.html

I don't think Frank is a partner at all. He joins up with Mike and goes picking but I don't think they are business partners. I've noticed each guy seems to use his own cash to buy stuff.

Kind of like the Mythbusters. Jamie owns the business and Adam just worked for him occasionally.
This kind of explains it: http://www.dailyfinance.com/2011/02/...ers-interview/

Wolfe is Antique Archaeology and Fritz has his own business. Based on that, I'd say Frank's picks go to his store/site and Wolfe's to his, or something like that.
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Old 01-06-2012, 02:22 PM
Tangent Tangent is offline
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(Clutching my chest and staggering backward.) You think they look middle aged?
They're in their late 40s. Isn't that middle-age? Just how long do you expect to live?
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  #50  
Old 01-06-2012, 02:51 PM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
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Originally Posted by markm View Post
This kind of explains it: http://www.dailyfinance.com/2011/02/...ers-interview/

Wolfe is Antique Archaeology and Fritz has his own business. Based on that, I'd say Frank's picks go to his store/site and Wolfe's to his, or something like that.
And he mentions that a lot of the stuff ends up on eBay, apparently. Thanks for the link. That answered several questions I had beyond the one in the OP.
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