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View Poll Results: Ever had it? What's it called?
Never heard of it, sounds great 26 7.24%
Never heard of it, sounds nasty 9 2.51%
Heard of it, never had it 84 23.40%
Had it as a child, but not since 33 9.19%
Had it as a child, still make it 49 13.65%
It's a Magic Egg 2 0.56%
It's an Egg in a Nest 52 14.48%
It's a Toad in a Hole 108 30.08%
It's something else 79 22.01%
I want one Right Now 70 19.50%
This poll is broken because... 15 4.18%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 359. You may not vote on this poll

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  #101  
Old 02-16-2012, 05:21 PM
thirdwarning thirdwarning is offline
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I never had these when I was a kid, but I did make them for my kids. The Frugal Gourmet suggested the idea in one of his books, so we use his name for them - Eggs Looking at You. My kids liked them, but I think part of it was the novelty.

I like the Kangaroo Egg idea. Might have to try that one of these days.
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  #102  
Old 02-16-2012, 05:25 PM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
U m m m ... I feel a bit silly, but, I guess I have to ask: how does one steam an egg?




A cup (or, better, a biscuit cutter, which is sharper so it doesn't squish the bread) makes a nice, perfect circle. Mr. Horseshoe does them this way. I've found, however, that carefully tearing the middle out with your fingers yields less aesthetically pleasing results BUT the craggy edges catch more eggy goodness.
Originally, when I was young, we cooked eggs in bacon grease and just scooped up oil onto the yolk to put a thin skin on the yolk.

As we got older, smarter, and healthier we did away with the bacon grease and moved to non-stick pans. In order to continue putting a nice cooked skin on the yolk, when the base of the egg is cooked, instead of flipping it, you put around a couple of tablespoons of water in the pan and throw the lid on. Cook for maybe another 30 seconds to a minute.

It takes doing it a few times to get the hang of it. Too much water puffs up the egg, too little and you donít get the nice white skin on the yolk. When itís done right it makes a perfect egg with runny yolk, and you use very little fat in the cooking process. Without having to flip the egg, the chances of breaking the yolk are minimal.
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  #103  
Old 02-16-2012, 05:30 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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That's more what should be called a "steam-basted" egg. A "steamed egg" usually (at least in my experience) refers to an Asian dish that is almost like a custard or eggs that are cooked in their shell in a steamer (like a soft-boiled or hard-boiled egg.)
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  #104  
Old 02-16-2012, 06:01 PM
Sattua Sattua is online now
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My mother never made it, but a diner in my hometown did and that's where I first had it. Their name for it was, interestingly, a "birdseye". Half Bird in a Nest, half Bullseye. Interesting.

Their version had cheese.
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  #105  
Old 02-16-2012, 06:14 PM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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"Sun toast" and "Birdseye"
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  #106  
Old 02-16-2012, 06:38 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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I voted Never heard of it, sounds nasty and This poll is broken because ... it doesn't sound nasty, but doesn't sound great, or even good, either.
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  #107  
Old 02-16-2012, 07:34 PM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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I don't remember where I learned how to do this, but I used to all the time - and I'm going to make one tomorrow for breakfast. The cut out hole fried is good also.
I think I used to butter the top and put butter in the pan for frying, and then flip - but I don't remember and am going to have to experiment. Sometimes the Dope is worth every penny!
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  #108  
Old 02-16-2012, 07:40 PM
CALIBURN CALIBURN is offline
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"V For Vendetta" was the first and until this thread only source which i have ever heard of this. thought it was a british thing.

but much like after seeing it in that movie this thread makes me want to experiment and try to make one. with plenty of butter. hmmmmmmmmmm

Last edited by CALIBURN; 02-16-2012 at 07:40 PM..
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  #109  
Old 02-16-2012, 07:42 PM
Wile E Wile E is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sitchensis View Post
Originally, when I was young, we cooked eggs in bacon grease and just scooped up oil onto the yolk to put a thin skin on the yolk.
...
We rarely had the eggs in toast because most of the time we had what you described but with vegetable oil. My mom would always warn me that the eggs at restaurants was not going to be the same so I never ordered anything but scrambled in restaurants. We called them fried eggs but I have since learned they are basted eggs. And yes, since you don't flip the eggs you are less likely to break the yolks.
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  #110  
Old 02-16-2012, 07:47 PM
Doctor Who Doctor Who is online now
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Grew up with these. They were called "Bullseyes" in my family (like a few other people above).
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  #111  
Old 02-16-2012, 07:54 PM
Rachellelogram Rachellelogram is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
I've found, however, that carefully tearing the middle out with your fingers yields less aesthetically pleasing results BUT the craggy edges catch more eggy goodness.
For best results, use cookie cutters to cut out the inside of the bread (heart, star, etc). Then you have interestingly-shaped breadlings to fry on the side
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  #112  
Old 02-16-2012, 07:59 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Never had it, and only heard of it later as an adult. For some reason I thought it was a Brit thing. Or do they do something else tasty with toast & egg?

I would happily have it.
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  #113  
Old 02-16-2012, 08:00 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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My mother used to make these when I was a kid in the Bronx. I like them, but never seem to make them now. She called them Porterhouse eggs. I don't know where she got the name; Googling doesn't seem to turn up anything.
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  #114  
Old 02-16-2012, 08:01 PM
Omniscient Omniscient is offline
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First time I ever had these was on vacation to Disney World and they called them "Goofy Toast". That name pretty much stuck around our house, though I'd also heard it called Egg in a Basket.
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  #115  
Old 02-16-2012, 08:54 PM
Larry Mudd Larry Mudd is offline
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Originally Posted by ZenBeam View Post
I voted Never heard of it, sounds nasty and This poll is broken because ... it doesn't sound nasty, but doesn't sound great, or even good, either.
It definitely isn't in the same class as eggs benedict, but for a quick breaky tailored to please a child or hung-over adult, it is better than it sounds. (A little seasoning on top and you are golden.)

Actually, I have made this for my wife & daughter maybe twice... tonight (due to nostalgia brought on by this thread) I told my wife I was thought it would be nice to start Saturday morning with Egg-in-the-Holes and she suggested that perhaps Eggs Bennie would be better. She is a spoiled, spoiled woman.
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  #116  
Old 02-16-2012, 09:15 PM
CanvasShoes CanvasShoes is offline
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Frog in a hole (I know, very similar to toad in a hole, but toads are gross and frogs are cute).
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  #117  
Old 02-16-2012, 09:40 PM
Girl From Mars Girl From Mars is offline
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My mother called it wombat in a hole, Australia in the 1970s.
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  #118  
Old 02-16-2012, 09:57 PM
Springtime for Spacers Springtime for Spacers is online now
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Please do not go on believing that all Americans prefer broken yokes.

Please.


mmm
Oh I know you don't but it is presented as a valid choice!
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  #119  
Old 02-16-2012, 10:18 PM
missinformation missinformation is offline
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My mother used to make this for me for dinner when I was little...never gave it a name. When I was in home ec. Bergen County, NJ, my teacher, Mrs. Saunders, called them framed eggs....we made them when we were studying, naturally, eggs, in Foods I
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  #120  
Old 02-16-2012, 10:56 PM
Oslo Ostragoth Oslo Ostragoth is offline
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I saw something similar a few weeks ago, but it added bacon, cheese, and extra bread and egg.

(Kicking myself for not bookmarking that one.)

Another one worth trying:

Cook bacon halfway. Line a muffin tin with it. Add an egg and bake until done.
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  #121  
Old 02-16-2012, 11:09 PM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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My mother used to make these when I was a kid, and I later learned how to cook them for myself. We called them gas house eggs, and I have no idea why.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
If you place a piece of cheese upon it, I will not argue with you and I will get into a physical confrontation with anyone who does.

mmm
If I have some ham lunchmeat in the house, I'll generally fry up a slice of it to eat with the dish...and now I will have to try it with a slice of cheese, too.

I don't like liquid yolks, though I do enjoy thoroughly cooked yolks, either fried or scrambled or boiled. In the case of this dish, I usually intentionally break the yolk so it will cook completely without having to overcook the white so much that it gets browned.

I use a drinking glass to cut out the circle in the middle, and of course I fry up that circle as I'm cooking the egg. I put the bread frame in the skillet, add butter in the hole, put butter on the side, wait for the butter to melt, then crack an egg into the hole and drop the circle on the butter on the side. Then I break the yolk. I add some butter to the top of the egg and the circle of bread, and flip when required. I salt the egg a little bit, but otherwise I don't season it.
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  #122  
Old 02-16-2012, 11:16 PM
Taomist Taomist is offline
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-Never had it growing up; always READ about it, though. Add me to the list that thought of it as a Brit thing.
-Love it as an adult, though I don't particularly care for eggs and rarely eat them, but...I like this
-I have always thought of it as Toad in a Hole, though I looked it up some time ago and apparantly that is NOT toad in a hole!

I still call it that anyway, pfftgtghhpgtbbbt.

Last edited by Taomist; 02-16-2012 at 11:19 PM..
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  #123  
Old 02-16-2012, 11:23 PM
Oslo Ostragoth Oslo Ostragoth is offline
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BTW, this is good breakfast dish when camping - you don't have to mess with separate toast and eggs.
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  #124  
Old 02-17-2012, 02:20 AM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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I am amazed at the number of names cited for this. I had only heard the two in my poll (magic egg and egg in a nest).

As for cutting the hole, I guess I'm a bit of a barbarian; I just do a jagged rough cut with the butter knife.

I also eat the (buttered) circle as soon as I cut it - too impatient to fry it up.


mmm
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  #125  
Old 02-17-2012, 03:01 AM
Princhester Princhester is offline
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I do a variation of this for the boys' Sunday breakfast quite often. My method is:

1/ cut the hole out of the bread;
2/ seperate out the yolk and put it aside;
3/ mix the white with a tiny splash of milk to make it runnier;
4/ soak the holed bread in the white/milk mix, turning it over till the bread is completely saturated
5/ put the soaked bread on the pan and put the yolk in the hole.

You can cook it one side up (often have to put a lid over the pan to get the yolk to cook if you do this) or turn it over.

I serve with maple syrup. We call it "sunny eggs".
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  #126  
Old 02-17-2012, 05:47 AM
SeaDragonTattoo SeaDragonTattoo is offline
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Heard of them, but I've just never bothered with the whole rigamarole of cutting a hole in the bread, etc. I just fry up the eggs, take them out of the pan, add some butter to the hot pan, throw in two pieces of bread and slide them around until buttered, heat until toasted. Two nice, pan fried pieces of toast (usually sourdough) and two eggs.
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  #127  
Old 02-17-2012, 09:07 AM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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Never heard of it until V for Vendetta. Now I make it all the time. Especially when I'm watching that movie again; I always get the craving for "Eggy in a Basket."
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  #128  
Old 02-17-2012, 12:13 PM
misling misling is offline
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I think the version my mom made was basically scrambled egg in french toast. She cut out holes in the bread, mixed up the eggs in a bowl with seasoning and a bit of milk and onion and stuff like that (it varied), and then dunked the holed bread in the mix (like french toast). Then she put the bread in the pan, let it grill, flipped the bread over, and added a half cup or so of the egg mixture into the holes. She also grilled the cut out holes dunked in the mix.
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  #129  
Old 02-17-2012, 01:06 PM
MrDibble MrDibble is offline
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So, Biggirl, how was it?
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  #130  
Old 02-17-2012, 01:40 PM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
I am amazed at the number of names cited for this. I had only heard the two in my poll (magic egg and egg in a nest).

As for cutting the hole, I guess I'm a bit of a barbarian; I just do a jagged rough cut with the butter knife.

I also eat the (buttered) circle as soon as I cut it - too impatient to fry it up.


mmm
You're usual sign off seems really appropriate with this post. Mmmmmmm
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  #131  
Old 02-17-2012, 01:43 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is offline
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I call it "egg in a basket," but that may be because that's what Cracker Barrel calls it. I don't remember my brother (who introduced me to it as a child) calling it anything in particular.
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  #132  
Old 02-17-2012, 02:03 PM
beowulff beowulff is offline
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I had one today, at Vincent Market Bistro.

It was delicious...
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  #133  
Old 02-17-2012, 02:06 PM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
So, Biggirl, how was it?
You have to be very, very careful. My son made it, took a look at about 15 minutes in and the egg whites were still raw. 5 minutes later, the yolk was cooked hard. Even with the hard yolk, it was pretty good.
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  #134  
Old 02-17-2012, 02:33 PM
psychobunny psychobunny is offline
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It's an egg in a hole. My mother never made it. I think I learned it from a friend's mom. Still eat it occasionally.
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  #135  
Old 02-17-2012, 02:55 PM
StuffLikeThatThere StuffLikeThatThere is offline
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In my family of origin, we called it a dippy egg.

My husband has converted me to calling it an egg-in-a-window.
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  #136  
Old 02-17-2012, 03:18 PM
Kamino Neko Kamino Neko is offline
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I made these (which are called egg hats*, btw) for the first time today, thanks to this thread.

I think I'll make them whenever I want a quick breakfast (ie, one that doesn't involve bacon, sausage and hashbrowns) that's not cold cereal or a couple poptarts in future. Tasty.

* Never made them before, but I'd heard of them, and Egg Hats is the first name I ever heard for them.
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  #137  
Old 02-17-2012, 04:09 PM
mundylion mundylion is offline
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How many names can a simple breakfast have? My mom made them for us and called them "one eyes", almost the same as someone above but not quite.

I am a runny yolk guy, my wife is 'hard scrambled' and my son 'over hard.' Not sure how that happened.

As for the broken yolk saying, there is a wonderful little place in Indianapolis called Patachou, I think, that serves a 'broken yolk sandwich' for breakfast. It has wonderful bread, some cheese and bacon or ham, and a broken yolk egg on top, the yolk broken only after the still runny egg is placed on the sandwich. So not the hard yolk type at all, quite good.

Yummy.
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  #138  
Old 02-17-2012, 05:01 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
ETA Biggirl, Here's a nice illustrated version from someone who uses ramekins, but it's very similar to how I do it. Although I rarely go the full cheese-and-stuff Monty, I like the simplicity of toast+egg.
Those do look good. I sent the link to my wife. <crosses fingers.>
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  #139  
Old 02-17-2012, 05:54 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Never heard of it. Doesn't sound great or gross.
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  #140  
Old 02-17-2012, 07:08 PM
DSeid DSeid is online now
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Mom never made it for me, but one of my older sisters did, and I've made it for the kids. We called 'em "Black eyed Susans" growing up.
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  #141  
Old 02-17-2012, 07:54 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Never had it (I don't like fried eggs), never heard it called "toad in the hole" (that's sausage in an egg-based batter).
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  #142  
Old 02-17-2012, 08:32 PM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
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I discovered these eggs at a Girl Scout campout. We called them Eggs In Toast as best as I can remember. I no longer eat them as I have a food intolerance for eggs, but I think I need to make these for the grandkids, except I'll use a heart shaped cutter, just like I cut my biscuits with.
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  #143  
Old 02-17-2012, 08:33 PM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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I use two slices of bread with a hole in both and call it "a grilled egg sandwich".
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  #144  
Old 02-17-2012, 08:51 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morgenstern View Post
Round these parts, it's called a Bullseye.
Yes. I knew there was a name that wasn't on there. Bullseye it is.
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  #145  
Old 02-17-2012, 09:54 PM
Taomist Taomist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenBeam View Post
Those do look good. I sent the link to my wife. <crosses fingers.>
You quoted a link, which didn't cross over, but which did link to other recipes as well, so... it's all your fault that I'm making bacon jam this weekend. ALL YOUR FAULT!!!!

http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/2011...ooh-mommy-jam/
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  #146  
Old 02-18-2012, 01:19 PM
jellyblue jellyblue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDibble View Post
ETA Biggirl, Here's a nice illustrated version from someone who uses ramekins, but it's very similar to how I do it. Although I rarely go the full cheese-and-stuff Monty, I like the simplicity of toast+egg.

\.
Just made this for breakfast. It was really good. Next time I'd butter the ramekins as well as the bread (it stuck) and put it in for only about 15 minutes (I did 20 and it was a hardboiled egg, basically). I like that you can pop it in the toaster oven before jumping in the shower and breakfast is pretty much ready when you are! Made the house smell great too. Thanks!
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  #147  
Old 02-18-2012, 03:41 PM
N9IWP N9IWP is offline
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My family called them "bull's eyes", and I remember having them when camping - never at home. (Bit that could be faulty memeory)

Brian
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  #148  
Old 02-18-2012, 04:13 PM
ASanders ASanders is offline
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The poll isn't broken but I didn't realize it was multiple choice. I had them as a kid, still love them and make them regularly, and they're called something else. What else? Nothing about toads or baskets or hats, nope.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eberhama View Post
Mom made them when I was a youngin', haven't had them since then. They were called "One-Eyed Jacks" in our household. The circle of bread that mom fried up along with it was a much sought after delicacy.
Close...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
Mom made it for me, I made it for my kids. Have in once or year or so. But it's called "One Eyed Sandwich."
Also close...

Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
My mom called this an Egyptian Eye. I have no idea why, but I like 'em. Haven't had one in ages, so I know what tomorrow's breakfast will be!
Wow, very close!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbaDog View Post
They were One-Eyed-Egyptions in the 1960s at my house in St. Louis. No idea why mom called them that.
DING DING DING DING!! My parents called them One-Eyed Eqyptians and I've never called them anything else. They both grew up in the NYC area, as did I. Since I've never heard anyone else use that phrase, I'd sort of figured they made it up and it had some inside-joke meaning. I'm amazed to hear that it was used elsewhere!

I sure hope there isn't some ethnic slur buried in that usage.
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  #149  
Old 02-18-2012, 07:25 PM
DirtyHippy DirtyHippy is offline
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Called them Egg in a Holes - but all one word, egginnahole. You cut the hole with a drinking glass, and cook that along with the main dish. I haven't had them for a while, but I think I know what's for breakfast this weekend.
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  #150  
Old 02-19-2012, 09:00 AM
An Arky An Arky is offline
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I think sometimes kids call it something and it becomes that name. When I was a kid, we called them Egg in a Ring, though I think I had heard it called Egg in a Basket/Hole before.
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