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  #1  
Old 03-14-2012, 03:35 PM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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I want to live in a log cabin. What do I need to know/where do I start?

I've never owned a home or property before, but my dream has always been to live in a modest log cabin on some tree-covered land in a hilly (i.e. rolling hills) rural area. I figured I out to start thinking about it/planning for it if I ever want it to come true.

Anybody here live in/own a log cabin? Did you build/buy? I have zero experience in buying or building, so I hardly know where to start.

Any suggestions on jumping-off places for this?
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:03 PM
CrazyCatLady CrazyCatLady is offline
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My in-laws built a log cabin on some lakefront property about 8 years ago. They bought the blueprints (maybe the materials, too, idk) from a company that sells that sort of thing. A quick Google search shows a buttload of such companies, many of which will customize your plans to suit your lot or particular desires.

The place the in-laws built is really nice, 4 bedrooms, two baths, walk-out basement (2 of the bedrooms are down in the basement), wrap-around deck off the main floor, Jacuzzi in the master suite. It's in fact far nicer than they had originally discussed--it started out as a little fishing shack, then got big enough to accommodate us "kids" if we came down for a family weekend, then the next thing mil knows, fil is asking where they should put the Jacuzzi. Now it's big enough to hold pretty much the whole extended fam-damily
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  #3  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:07 PM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
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My wife's uncle built a cabin out of a kit, it's a nice house with all the modern conveniences. Given the state of the real estate market in a lot of America, I suspect you could find a deal on an already built cabin.
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  #4  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:10 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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I have a friend who spends more than half his time in a log cabin in the Laurentians. As a student he had had summer jobs in the forest service and was familiar with chain saws. He bought the property and spent a summer felling the trees where he wanted the house built. He let the logs dry for a couple years. Then he built a 25 foot long trench and filled it with creosote (or some other preservative) and soaked the logs for however long he was supposed to. Then he hired some local construction workers who actually built the house using the logs he had sawn and preserved. My friend acted as their helpers. But they knew construction techniques and he deferred to them for most. When the needed a 12 foot log, he found or cut one. I still recall one amusing thing. The roof spanned 24' and was peaked up 5'. He explained to them that a 13' log would stretch from the roof beam to the edge. They didn't believe him and wanted him to get 15' logs. When 13' proved to be enough, they were amazed. They obviously thought it was some kind of magic. In a way, I suppose it is.

This "cabin" had two storeys plus a basement, central heating, electricity, and phone lines. No DSL or cable, though. So he has to use a dial-up connection for internet. This sometimes make exchanging versions of our joint research sticky.

My second experience with log cabins happened when I was in Japan. I and a group of people were watching some Japanese workmen putting up a large log-cabin type building. We had noticed that many of the logs had writing on them in Roman characters and were discussing this when one of the workmen, not Japanese, turned around and explained that the building had been in BC from BC fir and then taken apart. He had been sent by his BC employer to supervise the rebuilding. He must have had a Japanese interpreter, possibly from BC. So it is possible to buy a prefab log cabin. It was going to be a restaurant cum small inn, incidentally.
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  #5  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:23 PM
SiXSwordS SiXSwordS is offline
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If you can find the documentary "Alone in the Wilderness" I recommend it.
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  #6  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:30 PM
Sattua Sattua is offline
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Hmmm, do you want a true "log home" with log construction, or does a lodge-style house with faux log surfaces inside and out do it for you?

My parents live in northern Michigan and there are plenty of both around; plenty for sale too. The winters are nasty though.
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  #7  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:32 PM
Doug K. Doug K. is offline
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I used to have some friends who had a log home. They loved it, but had one snag, which may or may not apply in your area, that almost cost them the house. They bought it on a contract with a balloon payment. When it came time to refinance, all potential lenders needed an appraisal before they would issue a mortgage. Since log homes are rare, the appraisers couldn't find enough comparables to determine the fair market value. They did find someone who would issue a mortgage in time, but they were worried for a while.
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  #8  
Old 03-14-2012, 04:34 PM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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Where are you located at?

The cheapest kits I have heard of come from Texas by rail usually. All the pieces milled down to the same dimensions and are marked and labeled. You can choose to build it yourself or have it contracted.

Another option is "D" logs, they cut three sides of a log into basically a square, leaving the 4th side round (like the letter D). This makes for a smooth interior finish and since all the logs are the same dimensions an easier to build cabin.

The most expensive cabins are usually made from cedar using logs of different sizes. Each log has to be individually scribed and cut. The workers that make these are usually pretty specialized and travel around for individual projects.
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  #9  
Old 03-14-2012, 05:29 PM
phreesh phreesh is offline
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Depending on how remote you're planning on being, make sure you consider the utility situation. It's getting easier and easier to live off grid (solar, wind, batteries, diesel backup), but make sure you consider the extra cost and hassle.

Also, don't underestimate the cost of a road. My folks put in a pretty long road to their rural location and it alone costs thousands to get done professionally and able to withstand the elements.
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  #10  
Old 03-14-2012, 06:04 PM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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Right now I have an area picked out, which is far enough away from big civilization, but close enough for commutability to the main city. It's a small town in a pretty rural area about 20 miles or so from the nearest shopping area. I don't know much about the town itself. How do I learn about it? What do I need to learn about an area where I'm thinking about building in/moving to?

My favorite kind of log houses are the square log kinds. I'm not really into the stereotypical round log types. This is the type I love, it's nice and basic/rustic, with the square log look, I like the roof too. I'd just want mine to be a bit bigger.

Last edited by xanthous; 03-14-2012 at 06:05 PM.. Reason: clarification
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  #11  
Old 03-14-2012, 06:09 PM
Nars Glinley Nars Glinley is offline
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A co-worker wanted to build one but couldn't find anyone willing to finance it even though she had excellent credit.
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  #12  
Old 03-14-2012, 06:42 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by xanthous View Post
... I don't know much about the town itself. How do I learn about it? What do I need to learn about an area where I'm thinking about building in/moving to?...
Google it. Most municipalities these days have their own website. At a minimum, you can glance over the county's website, too - it ought to have links to info about local building codes, etc.
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  #13  
Old 03-14-2012, 07:01 PM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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Originally Posted by Nars Glinley View Post
A co-worker wanted to build one but couldn't find anyone willing to finance it even though she had excellent credit.
Hmm, interesting. Wonder if it had anything to do with what Doug K. mentioned above about mortgage lenders not having anything to compare to in value?

I'm in the Columbus, Ohio area, BTW.
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  #14  
Old 03-14-2012, 09:31 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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I've built several log cabins, and spent a total of several months living in them. They're not for everyone. If you want all the amenities of a frame house but one that looks cool, go for the kits or better yet the faux-log cabins. It's difficult to insulate a real log cabin without building walls, and then you don't see the logs. Without exterior walls to run plumbing and electrical things get a little tricky.

I'd advise you to rent a place that you think you'd like to build for a summer (and winter) and see what you like about it.
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  #15  
Old 03-14-2012, 09:33 PM
Arnold Winkelried Arnold Winkelried is offline
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Financing? Mortgages? Balloon payments? Prebuilt kits?
What do you think Abraham Lincoln did? He walked outside to the nearest trees, chopped them down with an ax, and stacked them on top of each other to make his house. Then he took off on his horse to hunt vampires.

Last edited by Arnold Winkelried; 03-14-2012 at 09:34 PM..
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  #16  
Old 03-14-2012, 09:43 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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My parents bought a log house in Idaho after Dad retired. The one thing that I learned about log houses, that I never would have thought of, is that the interior logs gather dust. You have to dust those suckers on a continuous basis.

So make sure that you don't have any big airy rooms with log walls higher than you can reach on a step-stool.
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  #17  
Old 03-14-2012, 09:46 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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Had a friend who built one from a kit. The place was just breathtaking (if you like that kind of rustic thing) and is currently for sale for $250,000 and it would sell in a second if only it was near some body of water. I don't know how to describe it, but I guess the first floor was one big open space, the living area and kitchen/dining area, with a couple of small rooms. Then there was a flight of stairs to the second level, which was only the master bedroom and a bathroom, (and thats all, you could come out on the landing and be looking down at the first level). The only problems were: 1) cleaning - the high windows, the ceiling fans, you would need scaffolding or something, out of reach it was dusty and dirty and 2) there were a lot of bugs that got in, like Asian lady beetles.
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  #18  
Old 03-14-2012, 10:49 PM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Consider split log siding. All the look, none of the hassle. If you want a lot of visible wood indoors, consider a timber built home.
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  #19  
Old 03-14-2012, 11:43 PM
Sudden Kestrel Sudden Kestrel is offline
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Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
The only problems were: 1) cleaning - the high windows, the ceiling fans, you would need scaffolding or something, out of reach it was dusty and dirty and 2) there were a lot of bugs that got in, like Asian lady beetles.
Asian lady beetles can get into a hermetically sealed container, the little demons. I found one in my freezer once.

For me the biggest issue with a log home would be the difficulty insulating it, but I live in MN so my perspective is a little warped. The one in your link, xanthous, is very attractive. Could you be comfortable in a space that small?
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  #20  
Old 03-15-2012, 12:45 AM
Beastly Rotter Beastly Rotter is offline
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Asian lady beetles can get into a hermetically sealed container, the little demons. I found one in my freezer once.
Was it married to John Lennon?
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  #21  
Old 03-15-2012, 04:08 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Originally Posted by Arnold Winkelried View Post
Financing? Mortgages? Balloon payments? Prebuilt kits?
What do you think Abraham Lincoln did? He walked outside to the nearest trees, chopped them down with an ax, and stacked them on top of each other to make his house. Then he took off on his horse to hunt vampires.
It also took Abe forever to heat up enough water over the fireplace for the Jacuzzi.
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  #22  
Old 03-15-2012, 05:17 AM
jjimm jjimm is offline
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Not sure if they have them in the US but it might be worth researching prefabricated Scandinavian timber homes like this too.

Neighbours of mine in the UK bought a two-storey one. It arrived on the back of two semis. The foundations had already been laid, and the walls were bolted onto them and put together by four or five guys with a crane over the course of just two days like Lego. The thing was astonishingly well designed, with the windows and doors already in place, as well as insulation, plumbing and wiring. They were able to move into it in just a week.
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  #23  
Old 03-15-2012, 08:21 AM
Sudden Kestrel Sudden Kestrel is offline
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Was it married to John Lennon?
Hah! I forgot to ask. I wouldn't have been surprised if it thought those little poop trails it made were some kind of art.
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  #24  
Old 03-15-2012, 10:34 AM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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I'm curious about insulation. The log cabin pictured in my link is one I stayed in during a winter weekend. It was cold outside (in the low 40s) but not freezing and it stayed pretty warm inside. Now, maybe it's because that cabin was so small, but it was very comfortable in there. How can people rent out cabins in winter if they're so poorly insulated as to be very uncomfortable?
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  #25  
Old 03-15-2012, 11:15 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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How can people rent out cabins in winter if they're so poorly insulated as to be very uncomfortable?
Big wood stoves, or high heating bills.
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  #26  
Old 03-15-2012, 11:31 AM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Big wood stoves, or high heating bills.
I didn't notice that the heat was running constantly in the cabin where I stayed. It seemed to be cycling as normally as it would in any house.

In my fantasy the interior walls are also log walls, so I hope I wouldn't be setting myself up for high costs, either in building or in heating, to achieve that fantasy.

It's time to investigate log home builders and see how they tackle this problem...will come back with pie.
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  #27  
Old 03-15-2012, 01:24 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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My friend heated the place with a big woodburning stove (also had a fireplace). He lived on several acres of woods and spent a lot of time cutting down trees for firewood. He also burned pellet coal for a time. Both methods left a sooty film over everything, so you might want to look into other ways to heat the place. Also, if you google 'insects and log cabins' you will get over a million results - the wood has to be treated properly, not to mention bugs getting in through the tiniest chinks. That's all I got, from what I observed of this particular log cabin, something to think about.
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  #28  
Old 03-15-2012, 01:59 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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Logs by themselves don't offer much insulation, especially round logs with thin areas where two meet. You can fill the gaps with caulking, but you're still talking relatively low R values. If you plane the logs you get smaller gaps, and therefore tighter walls, but you're still looking at 8" - 10" of wood which isn't a great deal of insulation.

Some kits basically have half round logs on either side of a framed wall that contains insulation. Some route grooves down the tops and bottoms of the logs and put insulated splines running the length of the logs which helps. But basic log homes walls are inferior to frame walls for insulation.

http://www.nachi.org/loghomes.htm
http://www.lincolnlogs.com/buildingsystems.html
http://www.wisconsinloghomes.com/log...ilding-system/
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  #29  
Old 03-15-2012, 08:17 PM
Jasper Kent Jasper Kent is offline
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I once lived in a 100-yr-old log cabin with a wood stove. I loved it, but I was younger, tougher, and crazier than I am now.

I'd recommend the modern log homes everybody else is talking about here.
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  #30  
Old 03-15-2012, 09:25 PM
mack mack is offline
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Originally Posted by xanthous View Post
I'm curious about insulation. The log cabin pictured in my link is one I stayed in during a winter weekend. It was cold outside (in the low 40s) but not freezing and it stayed pretty warm inside. Now, maybe it's because that cabin was so small, but it was very comfortable in there. How can people rent out cabins in winter if they're so poorly insulated as to be very uncomfortable?
Thermal Mass.

Quote:
Log is used as a building material to create the exterior, and perhaps also the interior, walls of homes. Log homes differ from some other construction materials listed above because solid wood has both moderate R-value (insulation) and also significant thermal mass. In contrast, water, earth, rocks, and concrete all have low R-values.
We built a log home in 2001-2002. 10 year anniversary in May . We bought the land (on NYC watershed) in 1997 and paid it off over the next few years. During that time we checked out different types of structures and settled on a kit log home made in the area. The manufacturer had booklets of different models, and I took elements of a couple different models and mashed them up into our 20'X28' palace. I used a cheap CAD program to do the design. I'd send the design to the sales guy and he'd have rough 'real' drawings made and work up estimates. When we finally settled on something in our budget we contacted general contractors and got bids. Once we settle on a GC we had to put in a driveway, septic, run electric from the road to the site, a french drain to catch run-off from the hillside, and so on...

The kit was delivered and the crew got to work. A few months later we had a lovely home with all the modern conveniences. We use an oil-burning furnace/forced air to heat it. We financed the construction with a construction loan and then converted that into the mortgage.
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  #31  
Old 03-16-2012, 12:39 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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I live in an old log cabin. We can't quite tell how old, but somewhere between 75 and 100 years. Log cabins are great. There is nothing like living inside a natural wood structure. There are some things to consider though:

1. What kind of wood you use. Pine is inexpensive, but requires ongoing maintenance to prevent rot. My cabin is made of white cedar which is naturally rot resistant. In one section that was in horrible shape I began to dig out the rotted wood, and found the rot had not penetrated more than inch into the logs, this was after more than 25 years since it had been damaged. But white cedar is considerably more expensive than pine.

2. What kind of interior do you want? My cabin is made from D profile logs, which means the interior walls form a flat surface. The traditional round log style will give you uneven interior walls and you may need to finish over them in some rooms.

3. Logs require maintenance no matter what type you use. They'll need periodic treatment with oil, and sometimes pesticides too unless you like woodpeckers tap tap tapping on your house. If you use a 'chink' system, the 'chinking' (actually just a type of caulk) will need to be redone at least once as the cabin settles. Other types of one off maintenance are needed as the logs dry and shrink.

4. You have to plan carefully for running wires, ducts, and plumbing. I'd suggest always have a full basement where everything can be routed right under the rooms. Lots of regular interior modifications work differently because you don't have ordinary walls. On the other hand you can mount things anywhere just using wood screws. No more molly bolts and the like. And if you remove a screw, just fill it with some wood putty.

5. Log walls, even with light colored logs will not reflect light like painted drywall does. So prepare for more lighting than you would use in other houses.

6. If the cabin has a southern or western exposure it will pay off in the winter time, but kill you in the summer. The back of our cabin gets the afternoon sun in the summer, and you can see the heat waves radiating off the logs. On a hot afternoon I'll hose down the back of the house to get rid of excess heat.

Despite a few drawbacks, I've never heard of anyone unhappy with a log cabin.
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  #32  
Old 03-16-2012, 12:43 AM
Mdcastle Mdcastle is offline
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I have no idea if it's still in print, but the Hometime show "Log Cabin", although it was a high end home, was an excellent introduction on the techniques and some of the ideosynchrasis of log homes.
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  #33  
Old 03-16-2012, 03:49 AM
Sudden Kestrel Sudden Kestrel is offline
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It was cold outside (in the low 40s) <snip>
Bolding mine. I just have to note that this made me chuckle.

If the low 40s is cold where you are planning to put this log cabin, I don't think insulation is as big an issue for you as it would be for me here in Minnesota. You could probably heat that little cabin in the picture with just a wood stove.
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  #34  
Old 03-16-2012, 08:41 AM
santorum santorum is offline
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Originally Posted by SiXSwordS View Post
If you can find the documentary "Alone in the Wilderness" I recommend it.
Or Dorthy Ainsworth, who built a log cabin twice! http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ainsworth86.html
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  #35  
Old 03-16-2012, 09:35 AM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Is fire a bigger concern with all that extra wood in a log home, or are the logs treated with some kind of retardant?
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  #36  
Old 03-16-2012, 11:07 AM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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Originally Posted by Sudden Kestrel View Post
Bolding mine. I just have to note that this made me chuckle.

If the low 40s is cold where you are planning to put this log cabin, I don't think insulation is as big an issue for you as it would be for me here in Minnesota. You could probably heat that little cabin in the picture with just a wood stove.
Well, I'm kind of chuckling too, because I might have had a MUCH different experience feeling comfortable in that cabin if it were -10 there, but the landlord can't control the weather when people rent that cabin and I'd expect they wouldn't rent the cabin if it weren't livable, so I kind of hopefully assumed that a log cabin like it would be relatively insulated year round.

I have pics saved at home of the interior walls of this cabin I stayed in. Clearly I'm in love with this cabin I stayed in. I ought to post them and see if anybody has anything to say about this particular style of log cabin with regard to the insulation thing/bug thing, etc.
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  #37  
Old 03-16-2012, 11:13 AM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
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We live in a log cabin/home in the middle of 15 acres. Here's a pic.

We've lived here since 2001.

I'll be short and sweet: a log home is an absolute pain in the ass. Don't do it. I so wish it was a standard brick home.
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  #38  
Old 03-16-2012, 11:41 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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but the landlord can't control the weather when people rent that cabin and I'd expect they wouldn't rent the cabin if it weren't livable, so I kind of hopefully assumed that a log cabin like it would be relatively insulated year round.
Some houses are much colder than others, and in general, log cabins are colder than insulated frame houses. You may need a wood stove running a good chunk of the day, or wear warmer clothes around the house, or pay lots in heating bills. Or all of the above. It's one of the reasons most people don't live in log cabins today.

Last edited by Telemark; 03-16-2012 at 11:42 AM..
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  #39  
Old 03-16-2012, 12:04 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Originally Posted by FoieGrasIsEvil View Post
Is fire a bigger concern with all that extra wood in a log home, or are the logs treated with some kind of retardant?
Although some fire deparments consider log homes a fire danger, IIRC, there is no evidence that log cabins catch fire more often than other structures. My knowledge of this subject, though limited, would show that hollow walls are a major cause of catastrophic house fires.
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Old 03-16-2012, 12:31 PM
NorthernBiker NorthernBiker is offline
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Is fire a bigger concern with all that extra wood in a log home, or are the logs treated with some kind of retardant?
It is counter intuitive but most wood log cabins are very fire safe. It is hard to catch such a large log on fire. Once they do go up, they burn hot and not much saving it, but so do most houses. There isn't any additional risk to living in a Cabin as apposed to a stick built house.
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  #41  
Old 03-16-2012, 02:27 PM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
We live in a log cabin/home in the middle of 15 acres. Here's a pic.

We've lived here since 2001.

I'll be short and sweet: a log home is an absolute pain in the ass. Don't do it. I so wish it was a standard brick home.
Can you give me a short synopsis (or long if you care to) of the reasons why you don't love it anymore?
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  #42  
Old 03-16-2012, 03:01 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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I'll be short and sweet: a log home is an absolute pain in the ass. Don't do it. I so wish it was a standard brick home.
I didn't notice this comment before. So I guess I've heard one complaint now. Though I can't fathom why.
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  #43  
Old 03-16-2012, 04:38 PM
Crafter_Man Crafter_Man is offline
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Because I spend every weekend in the summer spray washing, caulking, staining, painting chink, etc. While perched atop scaffolding or a ladder. And then there's Carpenter Bees, rotting wood, epoxying, etc. I am a slave to this damn place.
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  #44  
Old 03-16-2012, 06:47 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Because I spend every weekend in the summer spray washing, caulking, staining, painting chink, etc. While perched atop scaffolding or a ladder. And then there's Carpenter Bees, rotting wood, epoxying, etc. I am a slave to this damn place.
Ah! Pine no doubt. Ward Cabins have no chinking, and as I mentioned above, the White Cedar resists all attempts at invasion from bacteria, fungus, and insects (except for the damn carpenter bees, but I had those in my old stick frame house). Last year I bleached and cleaned the back of the house where it's been sunburnt. I put teak oil on it, and it looks so gorgeous now I have to do the rest of the house. If you use crap like Thompsons you are wasting your money. You need real oil, not wax dissolved in alcohol. That will stop a lot of rot and insect infiltration. As for the mud (chinking), I've heard there are some good long lasting products out there, but I have no experience with them.
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  #45  
Old 03-18-2012, 06:44 PM
congodwarf congodwarf is offline
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I have lived in my log home for 3 years. I love it. My fiance loves it. Everyone who visits our house loves it (even kids trick-or-treating and food delivery people).


However, it can be a pain in the ass.


I don't know what kind of wood it is but since the house is over 60 years old and doesn't have a rot problem, I'm guessing not pine. However, we do need to re-chink the entire damn house this summer. Luckily my fiance's parents have him a pneumatic caulking gun for Christmas and a compressor for his birthday.


We only had minor issues with getting it appraised. Eventually they just compared it with other houses with similar builds, if not similar materials.


Insurance was almost a deal breaker. Make sure that someone insures log homes where you want to build. We are stuck with our insurance company because they are the only ones we could find who insured cabins.

Also find out how close where you want to build is to the nearest fire department. It makes a difference in how much your insurance will cost (assuming you can find insurance in the first place). If the place you want to build has a lot of cabins, you'll probably be ok on the insurance. Our town doesn't have many and the few others are just log exterior.


We have rounded exterior and smooth (well, flat and rough) interior with a lot of beams on the inside. I believe there is a small amount of insulation between the exterior and interior and that the interior is made up of slats of the same wood as the exterior. I don't think it was made from a kit though. We were told it was custom built by the guy we bought it from (well, from his estate).


You may be tempted to put in a regular fireplace. Don't. Get a wood stove or an insert. Our fireplace is beautiful but it's pretty much useless for heating the majority of the living room (and is not helped by the fact that we have a loft and cathedral ceilings so all our heat just goes up. If you plan on having smaller rooms though, a fireplace would be fine. If you want an open floor plan, something with a blower would be nice.

Hmm.. Oh yeah. Bugs. When we moved in there was evidence of carpenter ants and bees but no termites. We had Terminix and a structural engineer come in. They confirmed that the problem was already gone and that the structure was sound. We signed up for regular treatements with Terminix. This is good because if you are certified to have no termites and remain a customer with them, you will not have to pay for any termites that show up later on (if they do). And they're good about dealing with other pests (our biggest issues so far has been mice).


Log homes are incredibly creaky.


http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...todriveway.jpg
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  #46  
Old 03-18-2012, 06:55 PM
xanthous xanthous is offline
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Serious great info and advice here, everybody. I'm going to thoroughly investigate this from every angle to make sure it remains a dream if I do it!
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  #47  
Old 03-18-2012, 07:13 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by congodwarf View Post
I Insurance was almost a deal breaker. Make sure that someone insures log homes where you want to build. We are stuck with our insurance company because they are the only ones we could find who insured cabins.
I had to carry much more insurance to cover replacement cost than I paid when I first bought the cabin. And even with that they only based the price on replacement of a pine cabin. In the mean time, even after the housing bubble collapse, it's now worth something comparable to replacement cost.

Check your options for replacing the chinking (that's not really chinking just 'mud' or 'caulk'). Again, I haven't had to do it, but I've seen several references to modern long lasting materials.

Last edited by TriPolar; 03-18-2012 at 07:13 PM..
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  #48  
Old 03-18-2012, 07:40 PM
congodwarf congodwarf is offline
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That's a good idea. The chinking we have has been sitting in the basement for a very long time (they left all the leftovers so we have logs and planks too - and a custom built door they decided not to use). I know it's still good because the we had to have one small log replaced because of water damage (broken gutter - before we moved in so they paid for it, not us) and he was delighted to find the original stuff still here. If that stuff is as old as the house, there are probably better options out there, even if it does still work.
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