The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:30 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Toenail fungus (eww!)

Last spring (2011), I developed a red mark under a portion of my left, big toenail.

That eventually turned yellow.

I went to the doctor, who cut most of the affected nail off with snips (the yellow area was not connected to the nail bed), then took a culture. Yep, fungus (eww!).

He immediately suggested medication if it turned out to be fungus. Umm, no way! It's only about a quarter inch from the edge of the nail, and maybe 3/8" wide.

I asked him if he could completely remove the nail, then I could use a topological cream to kill any remaining fungus, since everything I read says that the fungus is easy to kill, if you can get to it.

He said we could talk about it after the culture comes back, but my impression was that he'd only offer medication.

And so, after being confirmed that it was fungus, I started soaking the foot in a solution of vinegar. That lasted maybe a week (PIA).

I then started soaking the foot in a solution of bleach and warm water. I'd then cut the nail back as far as possible when it softened up.

That actually started to work, but then I got shipped overseas for 3 months for work, and didn't feel like (nor had the time) to buy bleach and something to soak my foot in.

And so it worsened.

I got home in April and resumed the soaks, which seem to work, but the nail grows so damn fast, that the fungus seems to get a toe hold (pun!) and worsen, then I cut the nail again. I can't cut the nail it constantly, since I need some bit of growth to actually get the clippers under to cut, and that little bit (1/32") seems to allow the fungus to thrive.

Grrrr.

So now I'm thinking, why not take a dremel with a cutting wheel (the sandpaper disk) and cut the nail right to the edge of the cuticle.

Just writing that made my palms sweaty, since I have a good feeling it's going to hurt like hell. Maybe a few pulls of Wild Turkey 101 first?

Who am I kidding, what a dumb idea. And yet...

So how do I get rid of it? It's such a small area, so medication seems like way overkill, especially given what it can do to your liver (and mine is taxed as it is). I'm to the point now of washing the foot, then prying the nail up and getting straight bleach under it with a q-tip. Again, starts to work, but the nail seems to only need to be a 1/32" long for the fungus to take hold again, and I just can't seem to trim that little bit off.

Maybe drop a dumb bell on the nail and hope it falls off?

What a nuisance.
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:40 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
The medication, Lamisil, isn't that dangerous, especially if you get labs every month to monitor your liver. Even if your enzymes do go up, they'll almost certainly go back down after stopping it. And it's cheap now that it's gone generic, too- as little as $4 a month at some places and you don't even have to go through your insurance for it.

Topical meds don't usually work very well, but if you are adamant, then I have heard that applying Vick's VapoRub every night can help.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:40 PM
freckafree freckafree is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
I have read in numerous places that Vick's Vaporub works on toenail fungus. Here's one link that talks about it.

ETA: Ninja'd by Alice The Goon!

Last edited by freckafree; 06-15-2012 at 07:41 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:41 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Right, drinking and self-inflicted power tools rarely ends well.

Consult your doctor before removing body parts, but tell him that you are getting to that point of desperation yourself. Your doc may not think it's as big a deal as you think it is.

I have a fungal infection, but it has spread to most of my toes. According to my doctors (3 in total, so I consider that a 2nd and 3rd opinion), it's a small-cell systemic infection, meaning it's throughout my body, and manhandling my toenails is just going to kill the messenger. They could fight it with the same drugs they use to combat other small-cell systemic infections; apparently it's this stuff called "chemotherapy." No, thank you. In the meantime, I've started using a gel called NonyX which looks to be vinegar in a gel form; smear it on the toenails after a shower and the discoloration should go away, so it's simply a cosmetic fix, it's not killing anything. Doesn't seem to be having much effect yet.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:47 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alice The Goon View Post
The medication, Lamisil, isn't that dangerous, especially if you get labs every month to monitor your liver. Even if your enzymes do go up, they'll almost certainly go back down after stopping it. And it's cheap now that it's gone generic, too- as little as $4 a month at some places and you don't even have to go through your insurance for it.

Topical meds don't usually work very well, but if you are adamant, then I have heard that applying Vick's VapoRub every night can help.
If the nail is gone, then topological should work, since it will be directly on the fungus. I think.

And my understanding is that medication is only something like 70% effective. I don't think it's worth it.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-15-2012, 07:48 PM
voltaire voltaire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
There's also FungiCure. Luckily, I have no experience with it, other than the gross commercials.

ETA: You should also consider treating all your shoes with the anti-fungal powders made for athlete's foot.

Last edited by voltaire; 06-15-2012 at 07:50 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:02 PM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2005
Per an old thread, I used tea tree oil and it worked well.
__________________
-Never tell a politician they are a two-bit whore, unless you want to be beaten silly with their bag of quarters.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:10 PM
Balance Balance is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 6,984
It's my understanding that many fungi don't do well in warm tissue, which is one reason why humans aren't afflicted with them more than we are, and why they tend to show up most on extremities when we are.

So...how's your circulation? Do your feet stay warm throughout the day? It may be that the warmth of the soaks are helping as much as the bleach. If so, and if you're really that adamantly opposed to the medication your doctor has recommended, you might try measures to keep your feet warmer and your circulation stimulated. I have no idea what your typical day is like, but perhaps warm socks (liberally dosed with anti-fungal powder) and--if you spend a lot of time sitting--regular breaks for short, brisk walks?

Note that I am not anything like a doctor, or even a biologist. I'm only suggesting this because you're rejecting your real doctor's advice and might as well try something a bit more scientific than getting drunk and grinding your toe off.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:18 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balance View Post
It's my understanding that many fungi don't do well in warm tissue, which is one reason why humans aren't afflicted with them more than we are, and why they tend to show up most on extremities when we are.

So...how's your circulation? Do your feet stay warm throughout the day? It may be that the warmth of the soaks are helping as much as the bleach. If so, and if you're really that adamantly opposed to the medication your doctor has recommended, you might try measures to keep your feet warmer and your circulation stimulated. I have no idea what your typical day is like, but perhaps warm socks (liberally dosed with anti-fungal powder) and--if you spend a lot of time sitting--regular breaks for short, brisk walks?

Note that I am not anything like a doctor, or even a biologist. I'm only suggesting this because you're rejecting your real doctor's advice and might as well try something a bit more scientific than getting drunk and grinding your toe off.
I have sweaty feet (like gallons a day), but no odor (thank you Smartwool socks).

I also sit at a desk all day, but do get up quite often to move around.

I like your idea of the anti-fungal powder.

And don't worry, the dremel idea is off the table.

I think I'll go back to cutting and soaking. A hammer may or may not enter the picture.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:27 PM
Lamia Lamia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
I've heard there's a laser treatment available, although I don't know anything else about that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevbo View Post
Per an old thread, I used tea tree oil and it worked well.
I did it this way too. I had what seemed to be toenail fungus on both big toenails, and after reading up on things online I decided to try the tea tree oil treatment. I got some tea tree oil at the drugstore and applied this twice a day to the nail with cotton balls. I did this until I'd used the whole bottle; I intended to buy another bottle but kept forgetting. But the nails seemed to be growing in healthily, and they have continued to do so. They are now about 3/4 normal looking again, although it's taken months and months for that much healthy nail to grow in. I couldn't swear that the tea tree oil was what did it, but the problem had been lingering for a while before I tried the tea tree oil
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:39 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
I've heard there's a laser treatment available, although I don't know anything else about that.

I did it this way too. I had what seemed to be toenail fungus on both big toenails, and after reading up on things online I decided to try the tea tree oil treatment. I got some tea tree oil at the drugstore and applied this twice a day to the nail with cotton balls. I did this until I'd used the whole bottle; I intended to buy another bottle but kept forgetting. But the nails seemed to be growing in healthily, and they have continued to do so. They are now about 3/4 normal looking again, although it's taken months and months for that much healthy nail to grow in. I couldn't swear that the tea tree oil was what did it, but the problem had been lingering for a while before I tried the tea tree oil
I'll have to give it a try.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-15-2012, 08:56 PM
twickster twickster is offline
Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 38,141
Medical advice and anecdotes go in IMHO, so let me move this thither (from MPSIMS).
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-15-2012, 09:01 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Keep in mind that toenail damage can look a lot like fungus- thick and discolored. This will grow out and disappear as new nail grows in and it gets cut off, causing people to think that their fungus remedies have worked, when it was never fungus in the first place.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-15-2012, 10:11 PM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Lost in the mists of time
Posts: 11,463
I'm not so sure that toenail fungus is that gross. I have a fungal infection in my armpit. As I wait for the medication to work on it, the infected area is red, moist, puffy and stinks to high heaven.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-15-2012, 10:31 PM
Hampshire Hampshire is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 9,471
Quote:
Originally Posted by voltaire View Post
There's also FungiCure.
I had under the big toenail fungus for years and just thought it was hopeless. My brother said he used this stuff and it got rid of his in a couple months. So I tried it and it got rid of mine in a couple months. Best $10 I ever spent.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-16-2012, 02:58 AM
Malacandra Malacandra is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky! View Post
If the nail is gone, then topological should work, since it will be directly on the fungus. I think.

And my understanding is that medication is only something like 70% effective. I don't think it's worth it.
That's "topical", dude. The other word means something completely different. I don't think you want to deform your toenail mathematically; the fungus is probably doing a bang-up job already.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-16-2012, 09:04 PM
BrassyPhrase BrassyPhrase is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevbo View Post
Per an old thread, I used tea tree oil and it worked well.
I second this (referring to one my mother had--which was awful) That and keeping it out of closed toed shoes while she treated it, even though it was kinda icky. But she's fine now.

But makes sure she keeps her toes well aired out just in case. (She never took prescription meds, she's kinda paranoid that way.)

Also, kept it clipped, clean and dry.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-17-2012, 10:05 AM
nikonikosuru nikonikosuru is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Okay, just had to say, this thread is so weird to me because of the coincidences.

My boyfriend's nickname name? Sparky. His problem? Nail fungus as well.

Unlike the OP, my Sparky has more of a walking around/lifting job. He's had the fungus for a year, maybe year and a half now. From what it sounds like, he thinks he caught it from his family members that he lives with...It's really bad looking. The most extreme case I've ever seen to the point that he's had toenails fall off. What amazes me is that he's so "meh" about it! I understand not wanting to use liver-damaging medication, but he doesn't seem to really care enough to go see a doctor. Would a doctor even be able to do much besides prescribe liver-damaging medication at this point?

He's extremely clean and uses topical gel but it really didn't have an affect. I'll have to mention the tea tree oil. Does it hurt/burn?
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-17-2012, 05:22 PM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post

I couldn't swear that the tea tree oil was what did it, but the problem had been lingering for a while before I tried the tea tree oil
Mine had been thick and yellow for about a decade, maybe more. Just the one little toe, so was living with it. Read about the oil, and since I had some already (tried it for exema, didn't work) I gave it a go. Put it on morning and night. After a week or so, the nail started coming in clear. Since the pinky toenail is so short, it didn't take as long for mine to finish up.

Eta: oil doesn't burn, at least on unbroken skin. Bit does smell mediciney though.
__________________
-Never tell a politician they are a two-bit whore, unless you want to be beaten silly with their bag of quarters.

Last edited by Kevbo; 06-17-2012 at 05:24 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-18-2012, 09:06 AM
shiftless shiftless is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,986
I had toenail fungus for most of my life, from like 10 years old until I finally got it cured when I was 40. Nasty, nasty stuff that slowly spreads to other toes. For actual nail fungus there is no topical cure, I've tried them all. There are lots of things at the drug store that claim to be a cure and they may kill fungus but they can't do anything about the stuff living under your nail. What did the job for me was Sporanox prescribed by my dermatologist. It requires blood tests to make sure it isn't causing other problems. You take it for something like 6 months while your nails grow out.

That seems like a lot to go through just to cure a little fungus under a toenail but I had it most of my life, it had spread to other toes and some people are really grossed out by it. It is surprising how normal people, who would never think of ridiculing any other sick person, think nothing of joking about how disgusting people with nail fungus are. Like we can just stop any time we want. I didn't go outside with my toes showing for years.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 06-18-2012, 12:57 PM
elbows elbows is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: London, Ontario
Posts: 8,893
Tea Tree Oil, worked a charm, for me, was recommended by a manicurist.

Just get some and use it, you won't be disappointed, truly!
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 06-20-2012, 07:12 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by elbows View Post
Tea Tree Oil, worked a charm, for me, was recommended by a manicurist.

Just get some and use it, you won't be disappointed, truly!
Well, I bought some tonight.

It smells awful!

I just showered, got my nail good and moist, then applied the oil with a Q-tip, then took a nail file to pry the nail up and get the oil under it.

So, day #1. Let's see how long this takes.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-21-2012, 10:51 AM
cher3 cher3 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
It sounds like you have abandoned the Dremel idea, but I just wanted to reinforce the advice to leave the toenail surgery to the professionals. You have no idea how sensitive that area is. My husband had surgery to kill off part of his big toenails because of recurring ingrown nails and he had to lie down on the floor and have me change the dressing the first couple of times. He would literally pass out from the pain.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 06-21-2012, 11:33 AM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by cher3 View Post
It sounds like you have abandoned the Dremel idea, but I just wanted to reinforce the advice to leave the toenail surgery to the professionals. You have no idea how sensitive that area is. My husband had surgery to kill off part of his big toenails because of recurring ingrown nails and he had to lie down on the floor and have me change the dressing the first couple of times. He would literally pass out from the pain.
I've given up (for now) on the dremel.

The oil seems to have a very low viscosity (or is it high viscosity?), leading me to believe it's capable of really seeping into the infection. I'm going to soak it tonight and cut as much nail off as I can.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 06-21-2012, 10:29 PM
TokyoBayer TokyoBayer is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
I had had toenail fungus, and got a prescription drug which cleared it up in about six months.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 07-18-2012, 08:22 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky! View Post
I've given up (for now) on the dremel.

The oil seems to have a very low viscosity (or is it high viscosity?), leading me to believe it's capable of really seeping into the infection. I'm going to soak it tonight and cut as much nail off as I can.
This is week... 1, 2, 3, ... something.

So far, tea tree oil does not work. I had high hopes, and unlike most other home-grown remedies, this really seemed like it might work. I mean, it smells awful, almost like a fossil fuel, and it seems really, really good at soaking into even the tiniest crevice.

But no, it has done no harm to my nail fungus. In fact, the fungus has now spread to the entire front portion on the nail, almost as though it was lead there by a very liquid and low viscosity carrier agent.

I have two choices, I think: get all liquored up and drop a dumbbell on that toenail. I have a 20 pounder and a 30 pounder to choose from.

Or I could go back to the dremel idea and just cut the damn toe off.

Or! Choice three, pry the nail up morning and evening and soak thoroughly with undiluted bleach. It may hurt like hell to shove a metal object under my big toenail and pry it up, but it'll be worth it to win this war.

To people who had success with tree tea oil, there was some other thing at work there. Maybe just spending more time on your feet with a nightly wash before applying the oil, or just plain coincidence.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-18-2012, 09:24 PM
kbear kbear is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Exilor worked fine for me. Twice a day for the last year or so, however long it took for a complete new nail to grow in. Took a hiatus in the summer by covering the nails with nail polish so I think that's why it took so long.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-18-2012, 09:48 PM
Cub Mistress Cub Mistress is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 2,541
I cured my nail fungus in an umconventional way. Somehow or another, while getting my vacuum cleaner out of the closet, I caught the edge of my nail and ripped it 80 % off. I said many bad words, but once I had calmed down I put tolfanate spray alll under the nail. I repeated this twice a day and bandaged the nail back in place. Eventually the nail fell off and new nail grew in, clean and healthy. The fungus has not reoccurred.

I do not recommed my treatment but I do wonder if drilling tiny holes in the nail to allow the meds to seep under the nail might not be effective.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-18-2012, 10:37 PM
DummyGladHands DummyGladHands is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Glad to see this thread resurrected. I think the tea tree oil after 1 month is doing something, but I know it will take a while. I have been buffing the nail w/a diamond file before applying, and I notice they seem to be drying out.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-19-2012, 01:28 AM
Enkel Enkel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2012
You might look at DMSO to carry the tea tree oil deeper into the tissue. Just make sure you read up about it before you use it because it can carry even bad stuff through the skin.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 07-19-2012, 02:04 AM
zweisamkeit zweisamkeit is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Go back to the damned doctor, dude! Tell him what you have tried, for how long and still no results. Explain just how important it is to clear up this bullshit (I believe telling him you are seriously and actually contemplating dropping a dumbbell or using a Dremel at home should be enough) and your reservations regarding Lamisil.

Let's see, extremely small chance you may damage your liver, or have massive self-inflicted trauma almost guaranteed to cause damage to far more than the toenail and/or potentially invite horrific infection in through an open wound.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 07-19-2012, 05:58 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 15,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ike Witt View Post
I'm not so sure that toenail fungus is that gross. I have a fungal infection in my armpit. As I wait for the medication to work on it, the infected area is red, moist, puffy and stinks to high heaven.
Oral thrush also involving my lips. [Aren't medications and their side effects wonderful?] Before it was all over all the skin peeled off my lips and into the inside of my mouth like a glove.

Have they tried nystatin on your pit fungus? [and that sounds like it is a combatant]
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 07-19-2012, 06:08 AM
elbows elbows is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: London, Ontario
Posts: 8,893
Putting it on with a Qtip?

Yeah, I put drops of it on, until the toe was soaked, then wiped away any excess. But yes, it can take a while if you've, say, let the infection really settle in.

Please stop with the hacking at the nail, and trying to tear it out, and just let your body do it's job and heal. It give me the willies, reading about what you're doing to it! There is no need, beyond keeping in short and trim, like your other nails. Please consider giving it a rest. Step back.

Keep up with the tea tree oil. Persist.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-19-2012, 09:15 AM
Lamia Lamia is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
I don't think there's anything that can actually restore fungusy nail back to its healthy state, the most any treatment can do is kill the fungus and keep it from spreading further. So even if the tea tree oil is working (and it's certainly possible that it isn't), there's not going to be any obvious change in appearance until the new nail has grown in enough to be visible.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-19-2012, 09:58 AM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
It's not even very important to treat toenail fungus. It's a cosmetic issue. I would strongly advise against pulling up your nail or drilling holes in it or anything like that. Do you know how many different types of bacterial infections you can get by doing that? They make fungal infections look really good by comparison.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 07-19-2012, 10:08 AM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
I'm not really going to do anything drastic like inflicting harm on myself. My earlier examples were in jest/as a rant over my frustration.

I really don't think the oil is working, judging by how the redness of the nail bed is spreading.

With luck, I'll accidentally whack my toe hard enough for the nail to fall off (and hopefully it'll happen to the correct nail!).
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 07-19-2012, 03:14 PM
Tethered Kite Tethered Kite is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Please try the vapor rub suggestion. I've known a number of people who have had rapid success. Slather it around and under the nail as best you are able. Put it on before bed and then pull on a pair of cotton socks.

Apply nightly for at least a month before giving up. When the problem clears use weekly as a preventative.

I am unsure whether digging around on your toenails can transfer the problem to the fingernails or not but I wouldn't risk it. Apparently no one here has seen a case of fingernail fungus or they wouldn't consider the problem insignificant. Those poor folks can't find anyone to eat their lunch with.

Patience is key. It takes time for a toenail to regrow.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 07-19-2012, 03:44 PM
control-z control-z is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
I have sweaty feet and toenail fungus too, they get hot in the summer or winter. I've tried tea tree oil and have been on Vicks for months now, doesn't seem to be helping my case but I will continue trying. Oral medications are off the table.

Last edited by control-z; 07-19-2012 at 03:44 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 07-19-2012, 05:39 PM
VOW VOW is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
A prescription topical called PENLAC may help. It works like a nail polish, actually coats the nail. It does take a long time, because the nail has to grow out.

Have yourself checked for Diabetes: Diabetics are vulnerable to nail fungal infections.

My doctor told me that OTC remedies don't work (she said, "Save your money.") and if you take the oral prescription medication, as soon as you stop taking it, the fungus comes back.


~VOW
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 10-27-2013, 02:32 PM
urflambe2 urflambe2 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
I discovered this about ten years ago. If you use 50% propylene glycol [food grade] and 50% cider vinegar plus 40 drops of a citricide [grapefruit seed extract] per ounce and apply this solution with an eye dropper twice daily you will get rid of any nail fungus. It may take months to rid the fungus, but you will regrow healthy nails. Your cost will be about $50.00. You will have 2 quarts of the solution, easily enough to treat your nails and some of your friends too.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 01-05-2014, 09:50 AM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Here's an update.

I started using vaporub last May. I would slather the nail with a big glob, then wrap with gauze and tape, keeping the nail soaked in it all day. I'd get home at night, remove the gauze, thoroughly wash both feet, then reapply the vaporub with gauze.

I did that straight for 4 months. No change.

What it has allowed me to do, though, is to pull the nail up to clean skin and cut the nail back. I'm able to get all the way to perfectly clean nail. The next morning, if untreated, the exposed nail bed becomes all flaky and white, like a fungal infection.

So I tried one of those OTC fungal "drying" liquids. Used that for another 2 months with no change.

I'm travelling for work now for quite a bit. I usually just leave the toe alone, only doing a thorough washing at night.

The nail will grow over that bad nail bed and become white and weak. I then use the vaporub for a day to moisten it and cut it back to the clean nailbed. What is exposed is white flaky skin that can easily be pried off to red skin. I seem able to do this endlessly.

I have bad psoriasis as well that manifests as raised areas of flaky white skin. I've started thinking that maybe that nail bed is actually psoriasis. I had the nail tested back in 2011 and it came back as fungus. But what if that was a false positive?

Anyway, I'm living with it at the moment. I'm actually in South America now and near the ocean. I've been thinking I should take a daily walk through the surf and see if the saltwater helps. Maybe I'll do that this afternoon.

I'm do home in a few months and will see my Doctor.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 01-05-2014, 04:13 PM
James Toothpaste James Toothpaste is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Gross!!
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 01-05-2014, 04:22 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 7,854
I'd think the gauze/tape routine might be making things worse, by keeping the area moist and blocking air circulation. I've also heard soaking your toes in old-school yellow Listerine can help.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 01-05-2014, 04:26 PM
SerafinaPekala SerafinaPekala is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
IANAD and this is anecdotal, but taking colostrum (health food store supplement or online) helps the body's own immune system fight off the fungus. It worked for me after battling toenail fungus for 10 years or so and for several other ppl Ive talked to. Once the fungus was gone I continued to take it but you may not have to.

As others have said, keeping the toenail trimmed back to the quick and trimming away as much of the fungus as possible, and keeping the feet clean and dry is imperative. I would not go removing the entire toenail myself tho!

Last edited by SerafinaPekala; 01-05-2014 at 04:28 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 01-05-2014, 05:36 PM
sparky! sparky! is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
I'd think the gauze/tape routine might be making things worse, by keeping the area moist and blocking air circulation. I've also heard soaking your toes in old-school yellow Listerine can help.
Yeah, but it's totally saturated in the vaporub. I figured that'd make the environment unhealthy for the fungus.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 05-04-2014, 02:36 AM
Little_Pig Little_Pig is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
This thread keeps popping up like a mushroom. It looks like I have a nail under attack. The following is a laundry list of possible treatments mentioned in this post. Any updates appreciated. Debating whether to just goto the doctor. Thanks.

Tea Tree Oil

Vicks VaporRub

FungiCure

Zeasorb Antifungal Powder. Use as a preemptive measure.

Exilor Treatment for Nail Mycosis Pen

Tolnaftate Antifungal Foot Liquid Spray

ciclopirox,Penlac,Loprox. Requires doctor prescription.

Doper Remedy. Works for urflambe2.

Last edited by Little_Pig; 05-04-2014 at 02:38 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 05-04-2014, 05:00 AM
kbear kbear is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
I used Exilor and it worked. You do have to wait for the nail to grow out and that takes time.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 05-04-2014, 08:22 AM
Iggy Iggy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
I soaked my foot in a warm bath with Borax. Worked well.

The plain old Borax laundry booster is what I used.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 05-04-2014, 05:57 PM
chiroptera chiroptera is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 4,215
I've had a spot of toenail fungus on each of my big toes for at least 35 years; at least since 1979. No thickening of the nail or anything unsightly beyond a yellow patch under each nail. The yellow patches have not changed in size since then. I dealt with the problem about 1980 by painting my toenails/getting pedicures (I'm female) to hide the discoloration and that's worked just fine ever since.

I have also lost a toenail, when someone dropped a couch on my foot and the new nail retained the fungus-y patch.

I've always regarded it as just a part of me, and never considered going to a doctor since it's never been obviously unsightly or uncomfortable and I'm otherwise healthy as the proverbial horse.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 05-04-2014, 10:50 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
My dad had several fungus-afflicted toenails, and when it didn't respond to conventional treatments, he had the toenails removed by a podiatrist. My sister came for a visit and didn't know about it (she lives a couple thousand miles away) and he was sitting in the lounge chair barefoot and she freaked out. Those toes looked like they had been partially amputated.

No, it won't kill you, but it really can adversely affect your quality of life.

I still worked at the grocery store when Penlac came out, and more than one man was a little skeeved at the idea of using - yikes - TOENAIL POLISH, but hey, that was the treatment.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.