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  #1  
Old 06-24-2012, 01:52 AM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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When did jr. high become middle school...

...in your area. And does anyone know why? Was it a good idea?

Are there still junior highs anywhere in the US?
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  #2  
Old 06-24-2012, 02:25 AM
Rodgers01 Rodgers01 is offline
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My family moved around in the early '90s when I was going through those grades, and in some places it was middle school, in others it was junior high. I had the distinct impression even then that "jr. high" was on the way out, and everything I've heard and seen since has confirmed it. I can't remember the last time I heard reference to a "jr. high."
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  #3  
Old 06-24-2012, 02:54 AM
voguevixen voguevixen is offline
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Wanna say 86/87. Could be wrong.
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Old 06-24-2012, 03:14 AM
Quintas Quintas is offline
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1986 here. Jr. High used to be grades 7-9 and high school 10-12. Now it's middle 6-8 and high school 9-12. My class was the last one to attend Elementary school until 6th grade rather than 6th grade being middle school.

As to why? Puberty? In other words, take all the kids in that obnoxious 12-14 age range and confine them to a single building.

Last edited by Quintas; 06-24-2012 at 03:16 AM..
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  #5  
Old 06-24-2012, 03:52 AM
AboutAsWeirdAsYouCanGet AboutAsWeirdAsYouCanGet is offline
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There's a Jr. high in my area. It's K-6 for elementary, and then 7-8 for jr high ....but it's regional so maybe that's why.
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  #6  
Old 06-24-2012, 06:31 AM
Justin_Bailey Justin_Bailey is offline
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The Jr. High (which was connected to the High School) became a Middle School (and it's own separate building) in 2005ish.

I think that's the distinction, by the way. Connected to High School = Jr. High. Separate building = Middle School.
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  #7  
Old 06-24-2012, 06:59 AM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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I always thought the 7-9 and 10-12 grade division was a good idea (previously it was K-8, 9-12). The difference between grades is significant at those ages, and to group them to minimize the differences seems to be a favorable step towards socialization.

So what was it about this scheme that made everyone revert?
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  #8  
Old 06-24-2012, 07:36 AM
ChickenLegs ChickenLegs is offline
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In my school in Ohio, I was in the last class that had a Junior High, grades seven through nine. After that, they went six through eight at the middle school, and nine through twelve at the high school.

My mother, who was on the school board, told me that arrangment was a better grouping based on maturity levels. In other words, sixth-, seventh-, and eight- graders are still kids. Ninth-graders and up are adolescents.

I was was in ninth grade in 1979.
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  #9  
Old 06-24-2012, 07:49 AM
ftg ftg is offline
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It's not really of question of "when" since both are in use in neighboring school districts today. Usually middle school is 6-8 and junior high is 7-9, but YMMV.
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  #10  
Old 06-24-2012, 07:51 AM
IvoryTowerDenizen IvoryTowerDenizen is offline
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My school was called a middle school in 78-81. I always though Jr High was 7-8-9, (or just 7-8) whereas middle school was 6-7-8.
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  #11  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:06 AM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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Originally Posted by Justin_Bailey View Post
The Jr. High (which was connected to the High School) became a Middle School (and it's own separate building) in 2005ish.

I think that's the distinction, by the way. Connected to High School = Jr. High. Separate building = Middle School.
I went to a Junior High (7-8-9) not connected to a high school. Most people I know did in the 1970s to 1980s. My kids go to a middle school (6-7-8) that was a Junior High when I was in Junior High - not connected to a high school.

We have one elementary school in our district that is 1-8 and then they go to high school (9-12). But most of our district is 1-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Not all districts switched, but the ones that did so did so in the late 80s to 90s. The problem was that their was a mini baby boom and the elementary schools became overpopulated - so the sixth graders were shifted to the middle schools, the 9th graders shifted to the high schools. Eventually the high school class sizes got bigger, but that's seen as less of a problem in high schools than in elementary schools.

(Births hit a low in 1975 - and less than ten years later in the mid-1980s we were closing elementary schools like crazy. But in 1987, 1988, and 1989 there was a boomlet - almost to baby boom levels, and we had to find a place for those kids by the mid to late 90s in our schools. Schools are expensive to build, and its cheaper to shift kids around)
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  #12  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:17 AM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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In 1988. That's when they built a new high school and the former jr-sr high became the middle school.
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  #13  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:33 AM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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My hometown's school district had "junior high" (7th-8th grade) until ~1985, then went to a system with "middle school" (6th-7th grade) before "junior high" (8th-9th). I'm not sure what they're doing now. Three-year middle school (6th-8th grade), maybe. I've also seen "middle school" used for 5th-8th grade somewhere, at a private school maybe.
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  #14  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:06 AM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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In my area, during the time I was in school, it started out that one school had grades 1-7 and the high school had 8-12. Then, with forced bussing, they changed it up a lot and there were three elementary schools. One school had grades 1-3, one had 4 and 5, one had 6 and 7, junior high was 8 and 9, and hight school 10-12.

But I have no idea when the junior high was taken out, and the newer schools built.
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  #15  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:07 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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When I was in school, it was "public school" (k-6), "senior public" (7-8), and "high school" (9-13). The public schools were smaller and located in the neighbourhoods. There was one senior public school that served the whole town. There were two high schools.

Things are different now. The senior public school was something of an experiment, I believe, and no longer exists as such; it's now a regular k-8 public school, I think, even though there's another public school two blocks away. (That school was always a public school.) The town has grown, and there are now four high schools. And Grade 13, an optional university-prep year, was eliminated and it's content spread into earlier years, possibly as optional courses.

But as far as I know, the big transition between 8 and 9 has always remained.

Last edited by Sunspace; 06-24-2012 at 09:08 AM..
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  #16  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:21 AM
gardentraveler gardentraveler is offline
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I grew up in Michigan. I think our schools changed to middle schools in the late '60s. I went to a Catholic, K-8 elementary school. We had a bunch of classmates who left to go to the public middle school in 1970. They had just built a second school. I think the old one was a junior high until 1968 or so when they opened the new middle school and added onto the high school.

In the meantime, the older middle school has become a community center, the new one serves only 7th & 8th graders and the elementary schools are split to teach K-4 and 5-6.
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  #17  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:27 AM
Ann Onimous Ann Onimous is offline
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Back home, it was the end of the 1977-78 school year. They built a new middle school behind the junior high during my 8th grade year. In 78-79, they started the new year in the middle school, now 6-8th grade, and demolished the old junior high building.

Here, my kids go to a junior high school, but they do it a little differently. We have several different schools here, and most of them are only for two grades. There is one junior high for 7th and 8th grades, a separate junior high for 9th grade (big transition year) and then high school for 10th-12th grades. We also have elementary schools broken down like this: K-1st, 2nd-3rd, 4th-5th, and 6th grade is at their own school. It works out very well.

Last edited by Ann Onimous; 06-24-2012 at 09:29 AM..
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  #18  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:28 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Well over four decades ago, I went to a junior high. I just recently was told it's now a middle school, but I don't know when the switch was made. In my area of West Texas, elementary school was grades 1-6, junior high (now middle school) was grades 7-9 and high school grades 10-12.
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  #19  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:52 AM
ballardfam ballardfam is offline
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I'm anti both middle schools and jr highs - at least in a general level. With the caveat that there are some kids who do better in a large school that may offer more variety in social and academic and athletic ways.

I don't think that grouping a large number of kids of that age is a good idea. My kids had a choice of joining almost 400 others as 6th graders, in a 1100 student jr high, or continuing in their k-8 where each grade has about 60 kids in a school where the staff has known most since kindergarden. The school counselor states that proportionally, while sex, drugs & violence do exist, it's much less prevalent than in the jr high. He talks about the sense of responsibility and affection to the smaller kids that even the more difficult students feel.
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  #20  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:07 AM
TokyoBayer TokyoBayer is offline
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When I was in 7th grade in '75 the Salt Lake school district went from having jr. high being 7-9 and changed to 7-8 and high school 9-12. Elementary school remained K-6.

They did it because there were four high schools, and enrollment was dropping so otherwise they would need to close one of the schools. Had it make sense to close one of the other high schools, they may have done it, but for student travel, etc., the only logical choice was the high school where all the rich kids went, so they killed off a couple of junior highs instead.
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  #21  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:17 AM
Eve Eve is offline
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Hmmm. During my school years (1962-75) in Pennsylvania, it was:

Elementary school: kindergarten-6th grade
Junior high: 7th-9th grade (and sheer hell, I might add)
High school: 10th-12th grade
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  #22  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:33 AM
tapu tapu is offline
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My 11yo son moved from elementary into middle school last year, a 6-7-8 arrangement.

There are dances, with all grades, where slow dancing is encouraged. ("Okay, folks, we're going to slow it down now. Don't be afraid to ask that special someone...") 8th grade boys as old as 14—maybe even 15—ask 11yo girls to dance. I doubt the girls feel like they can say no. I think it's a bad idea for both kids.

I'd like to see school systems divided into k-6, 7-8-9, and 10-11-12. Move everyone down a bit. People complain that "kids grow up too fast." Well, moving the grades up faster is one of the ways we promote that.
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  #23  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:33 AM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Originally Posted by Eve View Post
Hmmm. During my school years (1962-75) in Pennsylvania, it was:

Elementary school: kindergarten-6th grade
Junior high: 7th-9th grade (and sheer hell, I might add)
High school: 10th-12th grade
But who were the Freshmen in that arrangement?

My experience was kinda weird in this area. We had 1-7 as elementary school and 8-12 as high school. The 8th graders were known as pre-Freshmen. We were the lowest of the lows, but it didn't matter because we were in High School, baby!!

This changed the year after I was gone, and they made 8th and 9th Junior High. Or maybe it was 7th and 8th. Can't remember.

Last edited by John Mace; 06-24-2012 at 10:34 AM..
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  #24  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:46 AM
Dewey Finn Dewey Finn is offline
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I graduated from a junior high school in the early 1980s. The elementary school was K-6, the junior high school was 7-9 and the high school was 10-12. About five or ten years ago, they moved the ninth graders to the high school and the junior high schools were renamed middle schools.
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  #25  
Old 06-24-2012, 10:57 AM
Peremensoe Peremensoe is offline
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
We had 1-7 as elementary school and 8-12 as high school.
That's how it still is here.
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  #26  
Old 06-24-2012, 11:06 AM
Biggirl Biggirl is offline
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I was the first one in my household to go to a middle school instead of a junior high. That was 30 years or so ago.
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  #27  
Old 06-24-2012, 11:46 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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I get the idea that there's been quite a lot of fluidity and experimentation in how the different grades are arranged and named. When I was at my high-school reunion, I noticed that, in her yearbook, my older sister's graduating class was named "Year 5" instead of "Grade 13", for example. It would be interesting to make a history of such changes.
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  #28  
Old 06-24-2012, 12:26 PM
boytyperanma boytyperanma is offline
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for me in MA it was:

Kindergarten (it's own building)
1-6 elementary school
7-8 jr high (same building as the elementary)
9-12 high school (we didn't have a high school and got to pick one in the surrounding towns)

now in my home town it is:

k-5 elementary school (the former 1-8 building)
6-8 middle school (new building)
9-12 (regionalised with a specific town)
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  #29  
Old 06-24-2012, 12:30 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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In 1982, I asked the "why middle schools question" to my professor when I took my educational methods and materials classes. Population change was his answer- many school districts in the rustbelt were losing students then due to industries moving away or just shutting down. They couldn't afford to keep all their school buildings open and therefore regrouped their students in grades and buildings best suited to save money. This caused unusual (for then) groupings of, say, grades 5-8 or maybe 7-9. It didn't seem right to call 5th, 6th, or 9th grade "Junior High", so the Middle School moniker emerged.

These weird grade combinations have created a back-formed idea called "the true middle school concept".

Last edited by california jobcase; 06-24-2012 at 12:31 PM..
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  #30  
Old 06-24-2012, 12:44 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin_Bailey View Post
The Jr. High (which was connected to the High School) became a Middle School (and it's own separate building) in 2005ish.

I think that's the distinction, by the way. Connected to High School = Jr. High. Separate building = Middle School.
Not in my experience. There was not a single junior high in the city that was physically connected to, or even in the vicinity of, a high school. Perhaps it's a distinction now, however.
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Old 06-24-2012, 06:30 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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I recall some child characters in TV sitcoms in the early 1960s went to "grammar school." Was that just another name for junior high/middle school?

I see several references in this thread to kindergarten being included in elementary school. Kindergarten was strictly optional and loosely structured where I grew up. I actually attended it in Arkansas, because we did not move to Texas until I was almost 6. In West Texas, it was definitely not part of elementary school, and where we were in Arkansas I recall it being held in a church basement. Is it more part of the regular education curriculum now?


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Not in my experience. There was not a single junior high in the city that was physically connected to, or even in the vicinity of, a high school.
Exactly the same in West Texas.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 06-24-2012 at 06:33 PM..
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  #32  
Old 06-24-2012, 07:10 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boytyperanma View Post
for me in MA it was:

Kindergarten (it's own building)
1-6 elementary school
7-8 jr high (same building as the elementary)
9-12 high school (we didn't have a high school and got to pick one in the surrounding towns)

now in my home town it is:

k-5 elementary school (the former 1-8 building)
6-8 middle school (new building)
9-12 (regionalised with a specific town)
I live in MA and my hometown is like yours.
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Old 06-24-2012, 07:12 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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Originally Posted by Siam Sam View Post
I recall some child characters in TV sitcoms in the early 1960s went to "grammar school." Was that just another name for junior high/middle school?

I see several references in this thread to kindergarten being included in elementary school. Kindergarten was strictly optional and loosely structured where I grew up. I actually attended it in Arkansas, because we did not move to Texas until I was almost 6. In West Texas, it was definitely not part of elementary school, and where we were in Arkansas I recall it being held in a church basement. Is it more part of the regular education curriculum now?




Exactly the same in West Texas.
In MA in the 80's

Elementary (modern word for 'grammar') K-5
Middle 6-8
High 9-12
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  #34  
Old 06-24-2012, 07:18 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Originally Posted by etv78 View Post
Elementary (modern word for 'grammar') K-5
Ah yes, I guess the age of those "grammar school" characters would have been that of elementary-school students. Sometimes they lasted long enough that I can't remember which age they were for grammar school. Think Leave It to Beaver.
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  #35  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:03 PM
minlokwat minlokwat is offline
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There seems to be some confusion as to what exactly constitutes a middle school versus a junior high school.

Here’s how it was explained to me.

If you start with the traditional elementary school model, you generally have a class of students who is taught by one teacher who provides almost all of the instruction for the academic disciplines.

Skipping forward to high school, you have students choosing their own schedules, and who then have individual teachers for their subjects and each class is comprised of a different assortment of students.

In the simplest terms, the junior high model uses the high school scheduling system with each student having a different schedule and a different set of classmates for each class. For many students, this is a drastic change from what they had in elementary school.

As a result, the middle school model provides a more gradual sense of transition.

With the middle school model, you have a group of students who stay together for their academic classes and move as a whole to different subject area teachers. This allows some sense of stability for the students and allows a team of teachers to work with the same kids and in theory, better address their needs.
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Old 06-24-2012, 08:12 PM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is offline
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Originally Posted by minlokwat View Post
With the middle school model, you have a group of students who stay together for their academic classes and move as a whole to different subject area teachers. This allows some sense of stability for the students and allows a team of teachers to work with the same kids and in theory, better address their needs.
My middle schoolers have a high school model - they don't stay with the same group of kids all day and they get to select (or are placed in) different classes. However, my kids did have the model you are talking about as a middle school model - in 3rd - 5th grade - where they would move from classroom to classroom and teacher to teacher - but as a class.
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  #37  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:17 PM
Taomist Taomist is offline
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I moved from Chicago to Idaho in 82.
In the outlying Chicago area <St. Charles, if it matters> it was Jr high, 6-8th grade, high school 9-12th.

In Idaho, it was middle school to 9th grade, with high school being only 10-12.

So I'm guessing it's a matter of districts, as much as anything else.

Thank goodness we hadn't moved a year earlier or I'd have had to endure being a freshman twice!

Last edited by Taomist; 06-24-2012 at 08:19 PM..
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  #38  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:22 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minlokwat View Post
There seems to be some confusion as to what exactly constitutes a middle school versus a junior high school.

Here’s how it was explained to me.

If you start with the traditional elementary school model, you generally have a class of students who is taught by one teacher who provides almost all of the instruction for the academic disciplines.

Skipping forward to high school, you have students choosing their own schedules, and who then have individual teachers for their subjects and each class is comprised of a different assortment of students.

In the simplest terms, the junior high model uses the high school scheduling system with each student having a different schedule and a different set of classmates for each class. For many students, this is a drastic change from what they had in elementary school.

As a result, the middle school model provides a more gradual sense of transition.

With the middle school model, you have a group of students who stay together for their academic classes and move as a whole to different subject area teachers. This allows some sense of stability for the students and allows a team of teachers to work with the same kids and in theory, better address their needs.
IME 6th grade was more like elementary school, 7&8 like HS.
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  #39  
Old 06-24-2012, 08:42 PM
squeegee squeegee is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minlokwat View Post
There seems to be some confusion as to what exactly constitutes a middle school versus a junior high school.

Here’s how it was explained to me.

If you start with the traditional elementary school model, you generally have a class of students who is taught by one teacher who provides almost all of the instruction for the academic disciplines.

Skipping forward to high school, you have students choosing their own schedules, and who then have individual teachers for their subjects and each class is comprised of a different assortment of students.

In the simplest terms, the junior high model uses the high school scheduling system with each student having a different schedule and a different set of classmates for each class. For many students, this is a drastic change from what they had in elementary school.

As a result, the middle school model provides a more gradual sense of transition.

With the middle school model, you have a group of students who stay together for their academic classes and move as a whole to different subject area teachers. This allows some sense of stability for the students and allows a team of teachers to work with the same kids and in theory, better address their needs.
That's pretty much the way I heard it, on this very board (couldn't find the thread). Wiki agrees:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Middle School and Junior High School are levels of schooling between elementary and high schools. Most school systems use one term or the other, not both. The terms are not interchangeable.
[...]
Junior high schools were created for the purpose of "bridging the gap between the elementary and the high school," a concept credited to Charles W. Eliot, president of Harvard University.[27] The faculty is organized into academic departments that operate more or less independently of one another. The middle school movement in the United States saw this model as inadequately addressing the intended purpose of transition by maintaining an emphasis on the high school model, as reflected in the "junior high" designation.

The middle school concept often involves a group of two to eight teachers, depending on the school, from different disciplines working as a team with the same group of students of the same grade level, with each teacher teaching a different subject. This format facilitates interdisciplinary units, where part or all of the entire team teaches on the same general topic from the perspective of different disciplines. The middle school philosophy also advocates assigning students in each team to a homeroom. By having homeroom daily for various discussions and activities, middle schools try to foster a sense of belonging in students to ease social and emotional difficulties during adolescence.[citation needed]

Last edited by squeegee; 06-24-2012 at 08:44 PM..
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  #40  
Old 06-24-2012, 09:19 PM
Wesley Clark Wesley Clark is offline
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No idea. I was in junior high in the early 90s and it was still called junior high.

Preschool, kindergarten, elementary school (1-2), middle school (3-5), junior high (6-8) and high school (9-12). I always assumed that was the universal jargon.
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  #41  
Old 06-24-2012, 11:02 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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In Denver the junior highs were turned into middle schools, so they were the same buildings--exactly the same buildings. None of the junior highs were attached to a high school. Some of the grade schools were, however, attached to a junior high/middle school.

When my older kids were in school, some of the schools were split into grades 1-2-3 with a sister school teaching grades 4-5-6. About the time they decided to throw the 6th-graders (who were mostly 11, not 12) into middle school, they restructured some of these to be K-1-2 and 3-4-5, which didn't make a lot of sense. Then they restructured some of the middle schools into K-8, and that turned out to be really popular (anyone can choose any school, but some schools fill up faster).

Where it falls down, in my opinion, is 9th graders. Ninth-graders are 14, a lot of them are still little kids. My son was so intimidated by being on a baseball team with grownups--seniors, who were bigger, faster, stronger--that he gave it up. (I guess he didn't believe that in a couple of years he would also be bigger, faster, stronger.) In general a lot of the high school freshman looked really small compared to the rest of the students. Of course some of them remained small for a couple more years, but...

Back in my day, 9th grade was the best, because we were high school freshman, but we were at the top of the pecking order in junior high. Most of the people I went through school with considered 7th grade the absolute worst, but 9th grade redeemed things for them. So we all have kind of bad memories of junior high, except for ninth grade. Whereas my kids have fond memories of middle school but hated high school all the way through, because 9th grade was so bad and things did not get better. (Actually I have one still in high school, so there's still a chance, but things aren't looking good for nice memories of high school.)
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  #42  
Old 06-25-2012, 07:46 AM
Drain Bead Drain Bead is offline
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I moved from an area with a 7-8-9 Junior High and went to a place with a 7-8 Middle School in 1989. The shift was definitely occurring then. I think the place I moved from was set to go 6-7-8 the year after I left.
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  #43  
Old 06-25-2012, 08:03 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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My town (in MA) was:

1-6 Elementary school (we had 4, later 3 as populations declined)
7-8 Junior High
9-12 High School

I looked on the website yesterday and they still call 7-8 Junior High but it appears to be set up like a traditional middle school, with teams. It wasn't like that when I attended in the late 70's, we were on the High School model.
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Old 06-25-2012, 08:53 AM
LaurenIpsum LaurenIpsum is offline
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In my school district, the division was:

Elementary School - K-6
Junior High - 7-8
High School (aka Senior High) - 9-12

When I started Junior High in 1990, I was under the impression that it was a junior high because it only had grades 7 and 8, whereas a middle school also included 6th grade. But the following year, my school (and the other junior high in the district) was suddenly called a middle school instead, and has been ever since. They still have just grades 7 & 8.

Most other school districts in my area (suburbs of Buffalo, NY) are the same, although there is one that has a division like this:

K-2 - Primary School
3-5 - Intermediate School
6-8 - Middle School
9-12 - High school

Last edited by LaurenIpsum; 06-25-2012 at 08:54 AM..
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  #45  
Old 06-25-2012, 10:36 AM
piepiepie piepiepie is offline
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I went to middle school, but when my dad and his siblings went there it was the junior-senior high school. Then, they built the high school in the 70s and the Jr-Sr became middle (6-9 I think?). I don't think there was ever a junior high school besides the combined one, but one of the middle schools in the county is attached to the high school and is called a middle school. The county school system has pre-K through 5 elementary, 6-8 middle, and 9-12 high, and has been that way since the early 90s (for pre-K at least, older brothers had headstart instead) when I started school.
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:41 AM
UncleRojelio UncleRojelio is offline
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Location: ATX
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In 1976, the setup in my school district was:

Elementary, K-5th
Sixth Grade Center, 6th
Jr. High, 7th-8th
High School, 9th-12th

Yep, 6th graders had a whole school just to themselves. I don't know what the rationale there was.

Sometime after 1982, the Jr High became a middle school for 6th-8th grades.
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:45 AM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Somewhere around 81-82, I changed school districts. The old district was still using the jr. high system, so it made sense to pull me out of that district at the end of 6th grade. The new district, however, was already on the middle school system, so I started there in 7th, which meant everyone else had already known each other for a year (having been fed in from many different elementary schools), and I had to catch up with the social scene.

Another district in my hometown approached it totally differently. They had a jr. high that was 7-8-9 and the high school was 10-11-12. Which I thought was weird.
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