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  #1  
Old 10-13-2012, 12:47 PM
Vana Vana is offline
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Human Feces cleaning from clothing

I was running errands a yr ago on a rainy day (had been down pouring for hrs) when the sanitary sewer where I was walking began to shoot over flow onto the pavement where I was walking. 2 inches of the cuffs of my pants & my socks got sewage on them.

It was late when I got home, so I put the clothing I'd been wearing into a rubber maid container to washing another day. Here is the issue, I forgot about it for this past yr. I came across the container the other day, lifted the corner of it & there was a very musty damp smell, thus I remembered what was in the container before fully opening it.

I know most ppl would say to just throw out the clothing, but I want to try to wash the clothes b/c I was wearing a pair of pants & a top that I like.

My questions are: How much dangerous fecal bacteria could have survived the past yr when it was stored in a lidded container indoors in a laundry room while the clothing is still slightly damp? All yr the clothing in the container would've gotten warm in summer & warm in winter from the furnace air coming from a floor furnace vent 4 feet away from the container. So, can I assume that the dangerous/harmful bacteria that could've been in the sewage has died off or has it multiplied as it was stored in a dark closed up environment while still very damp?

I want to make sure to use a strong enough cleaner to kill off the feces bacteria & also want to handle it in a way that I won't get sick from it when handling it to load it into the washer. I've a compromised immune system. I also can't use bleach on the clothing as it triggers my asthma, plus the clothing is light pastel coloured & the bleach would ruin the colour of the clothes.

I either wash with Arm & Hammer or Xtra brand laundry detergent. Would either of those detergents kill off all the bacteria left in the clothing? After the worst is washed out, then I'd worry about any stains, apply stain remover & rewash the items.

Last edited by Vana; 10-13-2012 at 12:48 PM..
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  #2  
Old 10-13-2012, 12:59 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Sorry, the only truly safe way to handle this is to throw out the clothing. Really.

Second choice is cleaning with chlorine bleach in sufficient concentration to kill off the bacteria. You say this will trigger asthma problems (for the record I believe you). Thus, you'd probably need to seek out a commercial laundry willing to do this for you. Be honest with them what they're cleaning and tip generously if you can locate the actual person to do the job. Yes, this will almost certainly change the color of the clothing.

Laundry detergent alone will not do the job. Non-chlorine bleach will not do the job.
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:07 PM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
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Fecal bacteria may multiply but they don't become more virulent if you let them sit around. One easy, effective way of sterilization that doesn't overly compromise the clothes is with heat. Keeping the clothes above 160F for at least 5 minutes should be enough to bring bacteria down to safe levels and boiling for 10 minutes will definitely kill everything.

However, just because it's safe doesn't mean it'll be pleasant to wear. There may have been chemical reactions that have taken place that will mean it'll be very difficult to remove that musty odor.
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:20 PM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vana View Post
I know most ppl would say to just throw out the clothing, but I want to try to wash the clothes b/c I was wearing a pair of pants & a top that I like.
I have clothes I like, but none that I like enough to wash shit out of. My dad could have given me a shirt, while on his deathbed, and told me to always hold the shirt precious. But shit on it and it gets trashed.
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:26 PM
aldiboronti aldiboronti is offline
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Reported for forum change.
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  #6  
Old 10-13-2012, 01:43 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Moved to General Questions.
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  #7  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:02 PM
Szlater Szlater is offline
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Originally Posted by Shalmanese View Post
and boiling for 10 minutes will definitely kill everything..
Not true.

You need temperatures above 120C (wet, 5 -30 mins) or 160C (dry, at least 2 hours) to be sure to get rid of everything nasty.

Bacterial spores are tough buggers.

To get wet temperatures above 100C you will need a pressure cooker.

Last edited by Szlater; 10-13-2012 at 02:03 PM..
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Old 10-13-2012, 02:04 PM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is offline
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Home brewers use various fool proof non bleach sanitizers. Stop by a home brewer supply store. Nice to keep some of this around for cutting boards and cooking also.
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Old 10-13-2012, 02:11 PM
Rhythmdvl Rhythmdvl is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Sorry, the only truly safe way to handle this is to throw out the clothing.
Where should you throw it from if you really want to be sure?

What's the difference between the OP's problem and the millions of pairs of dirty underwear that get washed every day? Is it OPP (other people's poop)?

Also, WTF, raw sewage backing up onto the street? Is that common?
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Old 10-13-2012, 02:17 PM
Szlater Szlater is offline
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Originally Posted by Rhythmdvl View Post

What's the difference between the OP's problem and the millions of pairs of dirty underwear that get washed every day? Is it OPP (other people's poop)?
Raw sewage, stored in a container for a year. All sorts of nasties that I wouldn't expect to find in my underwear (soiled or not). You've got your coliforms, soil bacteria, chemical runoff which may include heavy metals etc.

Hmmm...y'know this smells fishy, and it ain't the sewage. Who puts sewagey clothes in a box instead of washing it straight away or chucking it out straight away.

And being immune compromised and doing it? Not clever.

Last edited by Szlater; 10-13-2012 at 02:17 PM..
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Old 10-13-2012, 02:27 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by Rhythmdvl View Post
What's the difference between the OP's problem and the millions of pairs of dirty underwear that get washed every day? Is it OPP (other people's poop)?
To some extent, yes. While no one has total immunity to what dwells in their intestines, you do have some accommodation with the microbes you normally carry around. There is also the sheer quantity of poop involved. Your immune system finds fighting off a few small colonies of fecal bacteria much easier than fighting off large quantities of same.

Most people don't leave massive skid marks in their underwear, and those that do usually wash them in chlorine bleach for disinfection purposes. Even many people who don't leave skid marks wash their underwear in chlorine bleach.

Og only knows what dwells in a so-called "sanitary" sewer. There could be infectious agents in there missing from your own, um, emissions. (Admittedly, that was more an issue in the past when things like cholera were more common, but it's still a concern).

Quote:
Also, WTF, raw sewage backing up onto the street? Is that common?
I wouldn't say common but it can and does happen, usually after unusual heavy rainfall or some sort of flood condition.
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  #12  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:29 PM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
Home brewers use various fool proof non bleach sanitizers. Stop by a home brewer supply store. Nice to keep some of this around for cutting boards and cooking also.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campden_tablets
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  #13  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:39 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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I'd expect that after a year, the clothes are stained, and that even if you can sanitize them, you'll never get the stains out. Have you looked at them to see if they're stained?

Last edited by ZenBeam; 10-13-2012 at 02:40 PM..
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  #14  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:50 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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I suffer from a bowel condition.

My shorts, and sometimes my pants, can be stained with feces. And blood.


Try Lysol Concentrate, in the brown bottle.

Works at removing stains almost as well as bleach, and can be used in moderation with colored clothing.
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  #15  
Old 10-13-2012, 05:53 PM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Soaking overnight in a concentrated solution of nitric acid should take care of this very effectively.
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  #16  
Old 10-13-2012, 06:55 PM
Michael63129 Michael63129 is offline
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Originally Posted by ZenBeam View Post
I'd expect that after a year, the clothes are stained, and that even if you can sanitize them, you'll never get the stains out. Have you looked at them to see if they're stained?
More importantly, if they have been damp for that long, I'd expect that they have started to rot by now (especially if cotton, but even synthetics will degrade), and will fall apart if you try to clean them, or will be very fragile, and for the entire garment, not just the stained areas (moisture will wick up through the whole thing, and you do also have bacteria).
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  #17  
Old 10-13-2012, 08:54 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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Throw them out--the container, too.

You got along without missing these clothes for a year? You don't love them that much.
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  #18  
Old 10-13-2012, 09:01 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Originally Posted by Rhythmdvl View Post
Where should you throw it from if you really want to be sure?
I dunno, you don't see coliform bacteria screw themselves over for a goddamn percentage.
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  #19  
Old 10-13-2012, 09:22 PM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is offline
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oxy clean will clean and sanitize.
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  #20  
Old 10-13-2012, 09:25 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Toss 'em, toss 'em, toss 'em. If they were that important, you wouldn't have waited a year to clean them.
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  #21  
Old 10-13-2012, 09:26 PM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Originally Posted by drachillix View Post
I use Camden tablets to "sterilize" my glassware when making wine. But I never shat in my carboy.
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Old 10-13-2012, 09:55 PM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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Originally Posted by Michael63129 View Post
More importantly, if they have been damp for that long, I'd expect that they have started to rot by now (especially if cotton, but even synthetics will degrade), and will fall apart if you try to clean them, or will be very fragile, and for the entire garment, not just the stained areas (moisture will wick up through the whole thing, and you do also have bacteria).
This.

There is very little chance that the clothing is in any condition to salvage, and the stresses of sanitizing them will likely do them in.

If I was assigned this as a job, I would go to an estate sale or a flea market, and buy an old pressure cooker and a large metal lidded pot.

Then I would don gloves, long plastic sleeves, a plastic apron, and an actual rated sealed facemask, pressure-cook the lot for at least 30 minutes, most likely an hour, and dump the water into a back corner of my yard, and dump the sodden lump into the pot. Then I'd use a sharpie to write "SEWAGE" on the pressure-cooker, and throw it away.

Then I'd soak the mess in the pot in a solution of peroxide bleach for an hour or so, then I'd write "SEWAGE" on the pot and dump it also.

Then I'd see if there was any way to mitigate the remaining stains, the mold-damp damage, the pressure-cooking damage and the bleach damage.
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Old 10-13-2012, 09:55 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I use Camden tablets to "sterilize" my glassware when making wine. But I never shat in my carboy.
Yeah, I'd probably use something like Star San (phosphoric acid), myself. Again, I've never actually shat in my brewing equipment.

I did walk in "gray water" at work, once - Chicago had such terrible rain storms many years ago that the toilet in my (ground floor) office suite began geysering. I ran around the suite and picked up any boxes of medical records off the floor, pulled up power strips off the floor/out of the water, unplugged anything near water, etc. Then I forwarded the phones to our main office, went home from work, threw out my shoes and literally washed my feet in heavily diluted bleach water.
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  #24  
Old 10-14-2012, 12:41 PM
Vana Vana is offline
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If the musty smell is engrained into the pours of the rubber maid container, it's no big deal if I have to throw it out (but I'll still try to clean it up 1st).

I was looking for the missing clothing all last winter, thought maybe I'd washed it & worn it at a later date & left it at someone else's house. I missed having the pants to wear b/c they R really comfortable & a nice colour. They R a cotton/spandex type mix dress pants. The shirt worn was like a long sleeve dress top, like cotton T-shirt material.

Some of U say the clothing could be ruined to the point it would disintegrate when I wash it. I'd thought that may happen too, but would depend on how wet it was when I put the clothing in the bin. It is hard to think back to how damp the clothing still was then.

Keep cleaning suggestions coming b/c I'm going to several of UR suggestions on hand to try for cleaning & deodorizing the clothes. Lysol was suggested & a friend of mine claims that worked on a toddler's bed sheets that had an old urine smell to them, another said oxyclean (I've already got Walmart's in store brand of that, so I'll use that too). As for all the heat treating suggestions, the house is kept at 70 degrees in winter & is warm enough that I often wear T-shirts & shorts in my house in winter. So is that not hot enough then to kill off the bacteria on the clothes in the close up rubber maid container?

I'm just looking to try to kill off the bacteria-w-out opening the container, then washing the clothing afterwards.

Has anyone got experience-w-using a solution called "back out" (often used on pet accidents & by mom's on their baby's cloth diapers to get out smells). I wonder if that would get any remaining odor out of the clothing after I've washed it. I know what some of U mean how damp clothes that have been washed at a later date tend to have a remaining musty smell to them. Maybe if that still happens after different types of treatments, Fabreezing them before wearing them would work.
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Old 10-14-2012, 01:23 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Just a note: on this board the convention is to spell out words, not extensively use abbreviations like "UR" for "you are" and "b/c" for "because".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vana View Post
If the musty smell is engrained into the pours of the rubber maid container, it's no big deal if I have to throw it out (but I'll still try to clean it up 1st).
Chlorine-based bleach used liberally on the container should be able to sanitize/clean it with no problem... other than your own intolerance to chlorine bleach. It's your choice whether you want to toss it or have someone else sanitize it.

Quote:
As for all the heat treating suggestions, the house is kept at 70 degrees in winter & is warm enough that I often wear T-shirts & shorts in my house in winter. So is that not hot enough then to kill off the bacteria on the clothes in the close up rubber maid container?
No, that's actually pretty close to ideal temperatures for breeding the bacteria.

Quote:
I'm just looking to try to kill off the bacteria-w-out opening the container, then washing the clothing afterwards.
You'd need very high heat for an extended period. Hot enough to boil water for an hour, for example. The clothes should survive it, but depending on what the container is made out of there might issues.

Quote:
Has anyone got experience-w-using a solution called "back out" (often used on pet accidents & by mom's on their baby's cloth diapers to get out smells). I wonder if that would get any remaining odor out of the clothing after I've washed it.
Probably - such things works using enzymes that specifically target the organic molecules comprising such things as "urine smell".
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  #26  
Old 10-14-2012, 02:31 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
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Lysol! Not Pinesol!

In reply to Vana's PM.
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  #27  
Old 10-14-2012, 02:36 PM
VOW VOW is offline
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Wait-wait-wait?

You want a product you can just pour into the Rubbermaid container, put the lid back on, and then shake it up and let sit?

No.

WHATEVER product you'd choose, the very FIRST step would be to remove everything from the container and take it to the furthest corner of your back yard and rinse it with the hose--and I'm not talking about just plopping the stuff on the ground and setting the hose on top and then going back into the house. You'd have to direct the hose stream on the stains and keep hosing them down, to dilute the crud, flipping the clothes over to get all sides.

First order for ANY type of stain is dilute!

If you aren't willing to take days, if not weeks, to toiling over these clothes JUST to see if they are salvageable, then throw it all away.

There is no magic potion that you can dump into that container to "kill off the bacteria."


~VOW
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  #28  
Old 10-14-2012, 02:39 PM
Szlater Szlater is offline
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Hot enough to boil water for an hour, for example. The clothes should survive it, but depending on what the container is made out of there might issues.
You need to be considerably hotter than boiling (~120C) to remove bacteria, particularly if the bacteria have had the chance to form spores (which any spore forming bacteria, C. botulinum in particular, it is a common soil bacteria after all and may be present). The clothes themselves will have to be exposed to the boiling water too, wet heat is far more effective than dry heat... You need considerably higher temperatures (~160C) for dry heat to be effective against spores and it takes much longer, three or four times to be certain of killing everything.
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  #29  
Old 10-14-2012, 02:53 PM
Hockey Monkey Hockey Monkey is offline
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The clothes are rotted. There are bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that digest small amounts of fiber for you in your system. These bacteria exit the system via feces (mostly dead, but some are still living). Their job is to break down things like cellulose (cotton is made of cellulose). In the digestive tract, they can only digest a small amount of the fiber you eat before it makes it's way out. But left to "digest" your clothes for a year...they are going to fall apart when you try to remove them.

You stated you have a compromised immune system. There is no way to sanitize what's inside the container before opening it because the high heat needed would destroy the container. You said you can't use bleach either, so mourn the loss of this outfit and move on. Really, it's a lost cause.
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:16 PM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Originally Posted by Hockey Monkey View Post
The clothes are rotted. There are bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that digest small amounts of fiber for you in your system. These bacteria exit the system via feces (mostly dead, but some are still living). Their job is to break down things like cellulose (cotton is made of cellulose). In the digestive tract, they can only digest a small amount of the fiber you eat before it makes it's way out. But left to "digest" your clothes for a year...they are going to fall apart when you try to remove them.

You stated you have a compromised immune system. There is no way to sanitize what's inside the container before opening it because the high heat needed would destroy the container. You said you can't use bleach either, so mourn the loss of this outfit and move on. Really, it's a lost cause.
This right here.

Rubbermaid plastic will not survive intact any kind of measures designed to sanitize what's inside the sealed container. Cotton-blend clothes will have bacteria digesting the plant matter of the cotton. Just trash the whole container and contents, unopened.
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:28 PM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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If the Rubbermaid container survives whatever you do to the clothes inside, the bacteria and feces on the clothes inside SURVIVE ALSO.

There is NO WAY to just toss something into that container and have it magically kill all the nasties inside. The nasties inside (if they really are from raw sewage) are REALLY REALLY NASTY.

If you really are immunocompromised, I don't understand how you can still be considering this. No single article of clothing is worth the possible damage from the truly nasty germs that are most likely festering inside there, waiting to be opened up and spore out into your house. You should be wincing as you read this possibility.

Again - there is NOTHING you can do to the clothes still in the plastic container that will make them sanitary.



In other news, By High Heat, we're not talking about a warm house. We're talking HOTTER THAN BOILING WATER. You really need better than 220 degrees, for at least half an hour, better a full hour. You will need a pressure-cooker to achieve this temperature for that long. Any plastic will MELT at that temperature - the container will not survive. Since the clothing is partly spandex, the clothing itself may not survive that temperature (the cotton will handle the heat just fine).

I'm with everyone else - please just write "sewage" on the plastic container, and toss it and the clothes inside (unopened) into the trash, and find yourself a new good outfit. I'm sorry for your loss, but this one's toast.
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  #32  
Old 10-14-2012, 06:29 PM
Zjestika Zjestika is offline
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Try searching on ebay for your clothes. Absurd as it might seem I've actually found things that I've loved that got too big for me when I lost weight, in smaller sizes. And regular old clothes are pretty inexpensive- I've gotten Target stuff for around $10 including shipping.
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:11 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vana View Post
It was late when I got home, so I put the clothing I'd been wearing into a rubber maid container to washing another day. Here is the issue, I forgot about it for this past yr. I came across the container the other day, lifted the corner of it & there was a very musty damp smell, thus I remembered what was in the container before fully opening it.


My questions are: How much dangerous fecal bacteria could have survived the past yr when it was stored in a lidded container indoors in a laundry room while the clothing is still slightly damp? All yr the clothing in the container would've gotten warm in summer & warm in winter from the furnace air coming from a floor furnace vent 4 feet away from the container. So, can I assume that the dangerous/harmful bacteria that could've been in the sewage has died off or has it multiplied as it was stored in a dark closed up environment while still very damp?

Actually, re-reading this, I'm guessing the clothing is probably covered in mold. And it might be all stretched out and stained as well.


Besides, to be blunt, even if they are salvagable, clothes can't always last forever. They wear out, they go out of style, or you lose or gain weight and they don't fit anymore.

HOWEVER, as the outfit you described sounds very basic, it shouldn't be that hard to find something similiar.
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:22 PM
Harmonix Harmonix is offline
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Originally Posted by Vana View Post
I've a compromised immune system.
I'm not sure I've seen anyone say anything about this little statement yet.

IMHO, Not worth it.

Going to the hospital because you're immuno-compromised would be many times greater the cost of replacing those clothes.

Throw it away.
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  #35  
Old 10-14-2012, 08:27 PM
HoneyBadgerDC HoneyBadgerDC is offline
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Plumbers get shit all over them all the time, they wash dry and wear and don't get sick. Amazing!
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:32 PM
ZenBeam ZenBeam is offline
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Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
Plumbers get shit all over them all the time, they wash dry and wear and don't get sick. Amazing!
They probably don't have a compromised immune system.
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:37 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Originally Posted by ZenBeam View Post
They probably don't have a compromised immune system.
They also wash their clothes regularly, and usually wear old ones when they go to work.
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  #38  
Old 10-14-2012, 08:49 PM
eschereal eschereal is offline
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What I fail to get is why the top ended up in the container when it was not involved in the contamination.
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  #39  
Old 10-14-2012, 09:00 PM
Seanette Seanette is offline
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Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
Plumbers get shit all over them all the time, they wash dry and wear and don't get sick. Amazing!
They probably don't let contaminated clothing fester in a container for a year.

Also good point made by another poster that they probably aren't immunocompromised (if a plumber has that problem, he/she is probably in the wrong line of work).

Had the clothes been cleaned promptly, I'm quite sure regular laundering would have done the trick. After a year of stewing in a closed container, even if the fabric hasn't rotted (I agree with those who think that's probable), stains are most likely perma-set and I cannot imagine the smell in that container (possibly the crews of hoarding-related shows could tell me).

Moral of the story: if you really care about your belongings, TAKE CARE OF THEM, including prompt cleaning.
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  #40  
Old 10-14-2012, 09:42 PM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
Plumbers get shit all over them all the time, they wash dry and wear and don't get sick. Amazing!
Having done some plumbing work, I'll just say

1) You wear clothes you don't care about/have a personal attachment to
2) I, at least, washed the work clothes in chlorine bleach for disinfectant purposes, and
3) Sometimes you do, in fact, toss the clothes in the dumpster instead of trying to salvage a lost cause.

You also scrub your own self pretty good after doing most plumbing work.
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:20 PM
Lasciel Lasciel is offline
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Originally Posted by HoneyBadgerDC View Post
Plumbers get shit all over them all the time, they wash dry and wear and don't get sick. Amazing!
Plumbers are mostly dealing with single-household water and sewer/septic systems, and not the nasty crap you get from a city drain when it's overflowed from too much rain.

They also wash their clothes when they get off work, and don't stick them (still wet and sewery) in tupperware for a year to rot and grow icky organisms.
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  #42  
Old 10-15-2012, 01:13 AM
FuzzyOgre FuzzyOgre is offline
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Chuck em. Not for the fecal matter, but because there is no way to know what chemicals might be in that sewer water.

Last edited by FuzzyOgre; 10-15-2012 at 01:14 AM..
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  #43  
Old 10-15-2012, 01:13 AM
qualityleashdog qualityleashdog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hilarity N. Suze View Post
Throw them out--the container, too.

You got along without missing these clothes for a year? You don't love them that much.
Abso-Lutely! See you next year!
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  #44  
Old 10-15-2012, 01:17 AM
qualityleashdog qualityleashdog is offline
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I think I've seen this shit on an episode of 'Hoarders.'
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  #45  
Old 10-15-2012, 05:33 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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I would have thought that, regardless of a bit of poop contamination (which wouldn't faze me, but then I have an infant daughter), the fabric would have deteriorated and rotted after a year spent festering and damp in a container?
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  #46  
Old 10-15-2012, 05:42 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Location: Western Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zjestika View Post
Try searching on ebay for your clothes.
By someone else's sewage tainted clothing?
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  #47  
Old 01-12-2014, 01:35 PM
Dad-sr Dad-sr is offline
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Soiled linens

In the "old" days my wife and I rinsed soiled cloth diapers, (remember them).in the commode before putting them in a pail to be washed. Even then we used chlorine bleach to get rid of the stains and all.
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  #48  
Old 01-12-2014, 03:18 PM
Doug K. Doug K. is online now
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How did you deal with zombie stains?
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  #49  
Old 01-12-2014, 03:37 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is offline
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Originally Posted by Doug K. View Post
How did you deal with zombie stains?
Damn, now we'll never get to ask why the hell she put the shirt in the container too.
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  #50  
Old 01-12-2014, 04:28 PM
Isilder Isilder is offline
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There's bacteria everywhere , the clothes only had to be washed.

Unfortunate that we weren't told if the OP went on to develop a deadly fungal infection from the spores released from the items in the container.. It is possible to inhale too many fungi spores , eg when turning the compost in the garden.

Last edited by Isilder; 01-12-2014 at 04:30 PM..
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