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  #1  
Old 10-21-2012, 02:57 AM
dorsk188 dorsk188 is offline
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Best Way to Keep Owls Away from Yard?

I've got a few friendly semi-stray cats that I feed and I'm worried about them at night. I've been hearing a lot of owl calls lately and glimpsed a really big one in a tree a few nights ago. Obviously, I wouldn't think of hurting the owls and I don't begrudge them doing what's natural, but I'd prefer they do it someplace else.

I've read that owls prefer dark areas to hunt and have put up a light in the back yard where my cats spend most of their time, but is there anything else I can do?

How much light is needed? I've just got a low-power compact fluorescent in a worklight right now. Also, should the light be angled down (bathing the yard in light) or up (to sort of dazzle the owls if they fly overhead)?

Would an owl decoy potentially drive them away?

Thanks for any advice. Like I said, I don't hold any ill will against them, but most of the advice I've found online isn't helpful. "Keeping pets indoors at night" isn't an option. My cats have been fixed and had their shots, but they only spend a short time inside before they want back out.

Last edited by dorsk188; 10-21-2012 at 02:58 AM..
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  #2  
Old 10-22-2012, 11:22 AM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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I don't think the cats have anything to worry about. Too fast, then can fight back or can take cover. Never had a "Cat Vs. Owl" problem yet.

Our turkeys, on the other hand, got decimated over the course of a few nights last month. But these are big, stupid birds that roost right on top of the house. Easy Owl pickins.

Haven't seen any Owl evidence since. So, to answer the question.......

I guess I'm not, actually.
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  #3  
Old 10-22-2012, 11:37 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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I don't think the cats have anything to worry about. Too fast, then can fight back or can take cover. Never had a "Cat Vs. Owl" problem yet.
Friends up north have lost numerous cats to big owls. An owl can certainly take a cat.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:06 PM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Friends up north have lost numerous cats to big owls. An owl can certainly take a cat.
Seriously? How big an owl are we talking? Round these parts, owls prey on mice etc. I've heard of falcons taking cats, but not owls.
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  #5  
Old 10-22-2012, 12:14 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is online now
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Well, a little screech owl isn't going to attack a cat, but a Great Horned Own could certainly pose a threat. From Wikipedia:

...The predominant prey group are small to medium-sized mammals such as hares and rabbits, which are statistically the most regular prey ... Birds also comprise a large portion of a Great Horned Owl's diet, ranging in size from kinglets to Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) and young swans...




Rabbits/hares and younger swans are certainly the size of a cat. That said, a cat can defend itself in ways unavailable to rabbits. Unfortunately, this is the tradeoff for cats enjoying being outside - they are exposed to far more dangers than indoors.

Last edited by purplehorseshoe; 10-22-2012 at 12:15 PM..
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  #6  
Old 10-22-2012, 12:16 PM
Lukeinva Lukeinva is offline
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The golf course installed cardboard cutouts of a sihlouette of a fox. Mounted on a spring which is planted in the ground and the spring wobbles just enough. They are painted all black. Since they put them in around the lake there has not been one Canadian goose to be found.

Found it!
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  #7  
Old 10-22-2012, 12:19 PM
April R April R is offline
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Unless you are neutering your stray kitties, they will make kittens which will be even easier prey for the owls. I say the owls would be doing you a favor in that case and keeping the feral cat population down.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:24 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
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Originally Posted by April R View Post
Unless you are neutering your stray kitties, they will make kittens which will be even easier prey for the owls. I say the owls would be doing you a favor in that case and keeping the feral cat population down.
It would be better to domesticate and bring the cats inside, but if the OP decides to go that way, it won't happen overnight. It took me weeks to get to know a feral Siamese well enough to approach him.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:24 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Since they put them in around the lake there has not been one Canadian goose to be found.
Unfortunately, it did nothing to solve the infestation of Canada geese.
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:34 PM
April R April R is offline
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It would be better to domesticate and bring the cats inside, but if the OP decides to go that way, it won't happen overnight. It took me weeks to get to know a feral Siamese well enough to approach him.
I just don't think she is doing those kitties any favors by feeding them and keeping them around her home if she is worried about predators. Feral cats have it much tougher than house cats and they are going to have shorter life spans. If you feed them you will keep them around and run the risk of losing them. There really isn't anything you can do about it. Ya know what I mean?
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  #11  
Old 10-22-2012, 12:35 PM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
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Owls eat cats? Nifty.
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  #12  
Old 10-22-2012, 12:49 PM
carnivorousplant carnivorousplant is online now
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Owls eat cats? Nifty.
Nice combination of user name and content.

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  #13  
Old 10-22-2012, 12:55 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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Yup, Great Horned Owls decimated the outdoor cat population in a friend's town up north, and a few small dogs. A few other species will take cats as well.
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  #14  
Old 10-22-2012, 01:34 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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Friends up north have lost numerous cats to big owls. An owl can certainly take a cat.
For sure. Cats seem to be a little more cautious, however. We've lost scads of cats over the years, but have always figured its the Coyotes. I guess a few could have been "Owled". They seem to hid under things better than the poultry.

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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Seriously? How big an owl are we talking? Round these parts, owls prey on mice etc. I've heard of falcons taking cats, but not owls.
These bastards wiped out a whole flock of Heritage Turkeys, probably averaging 10-15lbs apiece. Always evidence in an epic struggle, with feathers all over the place. They tear off the heads to get to the full crops.

Vicious Bastards!
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  #15  
Old 10-22-2012, 02:28 PM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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Originally Posted by dorsk188 View Post
I've got a few friendly semi-stray cats that I feed and I'm worried about them at night. I've been hearing a lot of owl calls lately and glimpsed a really big one in a tree a few nights ago. Obviously, I wouldn't think of hurting the owls and I don't begrudge them doing what's natural, but I'd prefer they do it someplace else.

I've read that owls prefer dark areas to hunt and have put up a light in the back yard where my cats spend most of their time, but is there anything else I can do?

How much light is needed? I've just got a low-power compact fluorescent in a worklight right now. Also, should the light be angled down (bathing the yard in light) or up (to sort of dazzle the owls if they fly overhead)?

Would an owl decoy potentially drive them away?

Thanks for any advice. Like I said, I don't hold any ill will against them, but most of the advice I've found online isn't helpful. "Keeping pets indoors at night" isn't an option. My cats have been fixed and had their shots, but they only spend a short time inside before they want back out.
Great Horned Owls can certainly predate cats. Needle sharp talons more than an inch long driven at hundreds of pounds per square inch of force will easily puncture a skull and result in almost instantaneous kills. Owls are unafraid of lights and can hunt quite competently in daylight or artificial light. Their superior eyesight, binaural hearing, and virtually silent flight make them superb predators. At night they do not have to compete with diurnal raptors, but they can be quite effective predators around the clock. If anything, rather than discommoding them, I'd expect your lights to work toward the owls' advantage.

That said, cats are probably unfamiliar prey items for wild GHOs and I wouldn't expect such predation to be very common. Except, as speculated above, in cases where numbers of kittens would almost invite predation on the smaller, more clumsy and less wary individuals. Owls are capable of taking advantage of opportunities, and I can imagine a resident pair becoming proficient at whatever prey, cats included, may be locally abundant.

The real answer is that cats, as is true with all our companion animals, do much better and live much longer and more comfortable lives indoors than out. Training them to remain inside requires dedication on your part, as well as the provision of sufficient entertainment and stimulation for their mental satisfaction. In addition to protecting your cats from predators, parasites, diseases, accidents, vehicles, nasty neighborhood children, and the host of other life-shortening problems experienced by outdoor cats, it also will save the lives of the hundreds of millions of small animals (mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds) that outdoor cats kill annually.
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  #16  
Old 10-22-2012, 03:55 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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My first (humorous) thought was a Buckminster Fuller dome over your property; that's starting to look like your best bet.
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  #17  
Old 10-22-2012, 04:08 PM
araminty araminty is online now
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I love you, Canny Dan!

I'd much rather have a population of wild owls in my backyard than feral cats.
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  #18  
Old 10-22-2012, 05:03 PM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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I love you, Canny Dan!

I'd much rather have a population of wild owls in my backyard than feral cats.
Thank you. I'm very fortunate. What you describe is exactly my situation.
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  #19  
Old 10-22-2012, 05:12 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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... it also will save the lives of the hundreds of millions of small animals (mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds) that outdoor cats kill annually.
More for the owls, I guess...
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  #20  
Old 10-22-2012, 05:24 PM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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More for the owls, I guess...
A correct but limited statement. Better perhaps to state that since virtually all domestic cats in the US, including ferals, derive the mainstay of their nutritional needs from deliberate feeding by humans, protecting small animals from cat predation greatly benefits the totality of the natural environment.

My apology for dragging this thread off course though, I didn't mean to sound like a crusader. To specifically answer the OP, the best protection from owls you can provide your cats is to keep them indoors. Owls are a potential predator of cats, although as stated earlier, that is not their usual diet.
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  #21  
Old 10-22-2012, 05:43 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
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Great Horned Owls can certainly predate cats. Needle sharp talons more than an inch long driven at hundreds of pounds per square inch of force will easily puncture a skull and result in almost instantaneous kills. Owls are unafraid of lights and can hunt quite competently in daylight or artificial light. Their superior eyesight, binaural hearing, and virtually silent flight make them superb predators. At night they do not have to compete with diurnal raptors, but they can be quite effective predators around the clock. If anything, rather than discommoding them, I'd expect your lights to work toward the owls' advantage.
I couldn't have said it better myself. I regularly see owls hunting around streetlights, mainly for insects brought in by the lights. They're not particularly deterred by lights, and lights will in fact make it easier for them to target prey.

Great Horned Owls are the top predators in their environment, and I wouldn't expect them to be scared off by much except a bigger owl. And there aren't any in most of their range.
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Old 10-22-2012, 05:45 PM
CC CC is offline
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Just dropping in to say that in all my years, and I promise you, that's a shitload o' years, I've never seen an owl. Not one owl. I've canoed and slept in the boundary waters, I've camped in Wisconsin and Michigan and Illinois, I've spent a lot of time outdoors. I even took a class once that purported to teach you how to call owls. Oh, I can do that call, all right, but I've never seen an owl. I taught science for many years, and dissected a number of owl pellets, so I've seen their vomit. But I've never seen an owl. I'm jealous.
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  #23  
Old 10-22-2012, 05:55 PM
Sahirrnee Sahirrnee is online now
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I've seen them and yes the big ones will go for cats, kittens and puppies.
We have a hawk in out neighborhood now, and you almost never see squirrels and rabbits anymore.
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:00 PM
araminty araminty is online now
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Just dropping in to say that in all my years, and I promise you, that's a shitload o' years, I've never seen an owl. Not one owl. I've canoed and slept in the boundary waters, I've camped in Wisconsin and Michigan and Illinois, I've spent a lot of time outdoors. I even took a class once that purported to teach you how to call owls. Oh, I can do that call, all right, but I've never seen an owl. I taught science for many years, and dissected a number of owl pellets, so I've seen their vomit. But I've never seen an owl. I'm jealous.
Sorry to hear it, CC. My best tips are:

- Keep a lookout for scat, lots of thick white pasty feces and the aforementioned pellets. Pellets can look quite different from each other, depending on what the owls have been eating, and can break down quicker in wet weather. Owls can sit VERY still, and the plumicorns really do change their silhouette. If the weather is wet or cold, the owl may look bigger than you'd expect, as they can fluff up their plumage to stay warm and dry. Conversely, they may look even smaller. (I do not condone the following treatment of a captive owl. But it's a good example )

- Ask people! Park rangers, other birders, photographers - any time you're out, ask if people happen to have seen any owls locally, and see if they can direct you. Some birding clubs log lists of sightings by species.

- Think about what would make a perfect owl habitat. Know a big ground squirrel colony? Or somewhere you've seen lots of gophers? Look up at the treeline for hollows, broken branches, thick cover -- where you might expect an owl to wait, hidden, to ambush its prey.

-Learn about your local species. Calls, mating season, common diet. Lots of owls will be searching for mates at the end of winter, which can make them more vocal. Once you know what to listen for, this could help you locate one.

- Stalk. Owls' ears are amazing, and yes, they can hear you crashing through the undergrowth. Sometimes they won't particularly care, sometimes they will, and will fly away on those silent, soft wings. (You probably won't see that either.)

Good luck!
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:08 PM
matt_mcl matt_mcl is offline
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Just dropping in to say that in all my years, and I promise you, that's a shitload o' years, I've never seen an owl. Not one owl.
I don't believe I've ever seen an owl in the wild, but that makes it all the more impressive that during Nuit Blanche (an overnight cultural festival here), out at the Biodome some folks from the Saint-Hyacinthe raptor centre bring in some of the owls they've rescued and show and discuss them. They are really cool and I go see them every year.

Owls are seriously my favourite. I would love to have one of the tiny adorable ones, if keeping owls as pets were remotely practical (sadly it isn't).

Last edited by matt_mcl; 10-22-2012 at 08:10 PM..
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  #26  
Old 10-22-2012, 11:52 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
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I've seen 29 species of owls, and I'm sure dozens of Great Horned Owls, over the years. I've seen 8 species in the Bronx alone. It's a matter of knowing where to look. Owls roost during the day in some fairly specific places. In deciduous woods you'll often find them in pine groves or other coniferous trees with dense foliage, usually perched close to the trunk. It takes patience and some looking around, but they can be seen.

Barn Owls too are generally easy to see if you can find out where they're roosting, often in barns, abandoned buildings, or under bridges.

If you have an Audubon Society around or other birdwatching club, they may have owling trips at night. They'll also probably be able to tell you about day roosts.
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  #27  
Old 10-23-2012, 07:54 AM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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A documentary on owl/cat predation: owl vs cat

No beautiful pea-green boat, however.
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  #28  
Old 10-23-2012, 08:55 AM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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Originally Posted by Sailboat View Post
A documentary on owl/cat predation: owl vs cat

No beautiful pea-green boat, however.
Well, not exactly predation. 'Play' I guess describes it better.

This is a Barn Owl, not a Great Horned Owl, and it is a falconry bird (it's wearing jesses -- those leather straps on its legs). This explains it being acclimated to the presence of the cat; I assume they share a household. Barnies are great mousers, better than cats, but without the size and raw power of their larger cousins.

While entertaining, I have a few problems with the creator of the video. First, I hope the cat is declawed. The idea of it making tiny cat claw punctures in that Barnie greatly troubles me, as cat claws are a primary vector for bacterial infections. Also, I worry if the falconer actually hunts with his owl. Given its acclimation to leaping attacks by predators, in a real hunting scenario in a wild area I think a bobcat, a fox, or even a moderately large feral domestic cat will make a swift lunch of the owl. Same might happen if the Barnie acts just that clueless in the presence of a Great Horned Owl, too.

Colibri, thanks for the kind remarks. Your advice, as always, is spot on -- for viewing wild owls, a little knowledge plus patience and persistence gets it done. You certainly trump my species count, but right now I can walk a few dozen paces out my office door and interact with 5 species of owls. As I said before, I'm quite fortunate.
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:03 AM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Well, not exactly predation. 'Play' I guess describes it better.
Uh, my pea-green boat comment was intended to indicate a certain...lack of seriousness.

My limited looking around indicates those two are an Internet phenomenon. But I agree it seems pretty risky practice. I've also seen videos of parakeets playing on well-fed cats that give me the heebie-jeebies.
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:39 AM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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Uh, my pea-green boat comment was intended to indicate a certain...lack of seriousness.

My limited looking around indicates those two are an Internet phenomenon. But I agree it seems pretty risky practice. I've also seen videos of parakeets playing on well-fed cats that give me the heebie-jeebies.
Oh, I understood that, I wasn't criticizing, just expanding the point. No offense was intended. And the video does show some interesting similarities in predatory adaptations. Both cat and owl are active (as opposed to passive) predators, and both typically favor prey items in the same size range, that being mouse. The owl is a swoop-and-pounce predator, while the cat uses spring-and-pounce, and both rely on talons. Both depend upon the element of surprise, and both are equipped with characteristics and behaviors that can be generalized as 'stealth'. Both also have physical modifications that enhance their night vision. Interesting parallels, yes?
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:03 AM
April R April R is offline
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I liked when the cat leap frogged over the owl so as not to hurt it, just surprise it.
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  #32  
Old 10-23-2012, 10:04 AM
Darth Panda Darth Panda is offline
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You could always try Owl Exterminators.
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  #33  
Old 10-23-2012, 10:15 AM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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Earlier GQ thread on Owls vs Cats.

Count me in as another who didn't know some big owls can take small cats.

As to your question, aren't birds in general highly territorial? That would mean that if you have one owl family nearby, you just have them to deal with and not other owls dropping by.

I can only tell you what we do in the Netherlands when we want to attract owls. We provide nesting places. Access to attics, hollow trees. You might do the opposite.

Last edited by Maastricht; 10-23-2012 at 10:17 AM..
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:20 AM
Finagle Finagle is offline
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Sorry to hear it, CC. My best tips are:

- Keep a lookout for scat, lots of thick white pasty feces and the aforementioned pellets. Pellets can look quite different from each other, depending on what the owls have been eating, and can break down quicker in wet weather. Owls can sit VERY still, and the plumicorns really do change their silhouette.
Some owls are very much creatures of habit and will roost in the same place day after day. There was a saw whet owl in a nearby Audubon sanctuary a couple of winters ago that roosted on the same branch day after day. It was an amazingly well-chosen perch -- you actually had to walk out on a frozen pond to see it. (I assume that the birders who first located it did so by the "whitewash".)

Screech owls are "easiest" to locate in the winter -- they will often inhabit small hollows in trees often facing south or west so that they can hang out in the sun to warm up on cold days.

Great horned owls are generally shy and retiring (and also nocturnal). They'll hang out in shady parts of pine trees and are pretty much invisible at any distance, even though they're the size of toaster ovens.

Barred owls are a bit more conspicuous due to their white breasts, but can easily be mistaken for sunlight on a branch. You probably won't see one unless you're looking for it or it flies. They sometimes call during the day ("who cooks for you?") which makes them easier to track down.

Short-eared owls are crepuscular and can sometimes be seen in the afternoon or dusk hunting in marshes. They like to perch on low tree branches or posts.

Snowy owls are easy to find in a good year. Just go to a wildlife refuge near a beach in the winter and look for the big white ... Canon lenses of the photographers.
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:29 AM
blondebear blondebear is online now
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I used to see burrowing owls pretty frequently in the undeveloped areas in north San Jose and Santa Clara. Sadly they're almost all gone now.
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:58 AM
Turek Turek is offline
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I was looking for red-tail hawks' nests one winter near our house (a suburban area north of Dallas), when I found a likely candidate.

Imagine my surprise when a Great Horned Owl poked his head out.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2739/4...f137faeb_z.jpg

Later, there were babies:

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4012/4...2bb6d926_z.jpg
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Old 10-23-2012, 11:00 AM
Sailboat Sailboat is offline
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Originally Posted by CannyDan View Post
And the video does show some interesting similarities in predatory adaptations. Both cat and owl are active (as opposed to passive) predators, and both typically favor prey items in the same size range, that being mouse. The owl is a swoop-and-pounce predator, while the cat uses spring-and-pounce, and both rely on talons. Both depend upon the element of surprise, and both are equipped with characteristics and behaviors that can be generalized as 'stealth'. Both also have physical modifications that enhance their night vision. Interesting parallels, yes?
Both will also periodically hork up something disgusting on your carpet!
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Old 10-23-2012, 11:03 AM
April R April R is offline
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I was looking for red-tail hawks' nests one winter near our house (a suburban area north of Dallas), when I found a likely candidate.

Imagine my surprise when a Great Horned Owl poked his head out.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2739/4...f137faeb_z.jpg

Later, there were babies:

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4012/4...2bb6d926_z.jpg
awww, owl babies!
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  #39  
Old 10-23-2012, 11:43 AM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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Both will also periodically hork up something disgusting on your carpet!

True dat!
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:06 PM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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I can only tell you what we do in the Netherlands when we want to attract owls. We provide nesting places. Access to attics, hollow trees. You might do the opposite.
Wiki says they often use abandoned nests of the Common Buzzard. And big hollows in trees and abandoned attics. So in winter, remove those or close them off and you are less likely to have Great Horned Owls on your property.

By the way, it is a constant amazement for me to see how casually rich you people are in wildlife. In Holland we have a relative of the Great Horned Owl, we call it the OeHoe. They are very, very rare. It is front page news of a local paper when one shows up. One known nesting site has bird enthusiasts from all over the country making pelgrimages to look at the owl family with binoculars and cameras. At the place I work, conservationists know the exact whereabouts of all the twenty pairs of Oehoes in the province. When they show up in a quarry, it is seriously debated with the quarry's owner if he should stop working that part of the quarry and be compensated for it. That is how we think of wildlife.

Contrast that with you. " Oh, a mountain lion always comes in and eats the cat food" . "My stray cats are picked off by the Great Horned Owl that sometimes drops by". "How can I get rid of those pesky bears in my back yard? They use my kids play equipment". As do the foxes on my trampoline. ?

Pure wealth, you guys. Enjoy it while you can.

Last edited by Maastricht; 10-23-2012 at 12:08 PM..
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  #41  
Old 10-23-2012, 12:18 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is online now
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Try rubber snakes. Birds hate snakes.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:36 PM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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Try rubber snakes. Birds hate snakes.
Is this a whoosh? Raptors including owls predate snakes.
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Old 10-23-2012, 03:32 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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Pure wealth, you guys. Enjoy it while you can.
There have been a few news stories recently pointing out that if we're seeing coyotes in Chicago, fer chrissakes, and foxes and other medium-scale predators, it may well be a matter of time before we start seeing bears & mountain lions in inhabited areas on a regular basis.

This will not end well.
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Old 10-23-2012, 03:57 PM
April R April R is offline
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I guess in the US we still have more land than people per capita. And we are constantly encroaching on wild habitat so interaction between people and wildlife is inevitable.
My female chow chow when we lived in Alaska had a regular visit from a fox for a winter. He would yoodle at my dog who would bark back then get a mouth full of dog food which she would walk over to the fence and lay it down for the fox to eat.
We also had moose who regularly came up to my window to eat from the willows which grew in our back yard.
In Tennessee, right outside of the city of Memphis we see raccoons and red tailed hawks. I also once saw a juvenile bald eagle eating from a fish farm/pay-to-fish place for a few weeks two summers ago. When I contacted the local Parks department they speculated he had stopped there on his way up North. Pretty cool. I hadn't seen bald eagles outside of captivity since I lived in Alaska. Apparently they are known to nest at Reel Foot Lake which is north of me, I should go check it out with my kids sometime.
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Old 10-23-2012, 04:35 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is online now
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Is this a whoosh? Raptors including owls predate snakes.
Get bigger snakes? Sorry, I was thinking of keeping pigeons off the ledge.
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Old 10-23-2012, 04:52 PM
CannyDan CannyDan is offline
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Get bigger snakes? Sorry, I was thinking of keeping pigeons off the ledge.
No harm done. Rubber snakes are indeed sometimes effective for pigeons, although not for very long. Since it doesn't move and doesn't eat anybody, the once scary object soon becomes relegated to 'furniture' status and ignored.
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Old 10-24-2012, 12:50 AM
GiantRat GiantRat is offline
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A shotgun should solve your problem.

And prevent a Hitchcock nightmare from becoming reality.
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  #48  
Old 10-24-2012, 02:54 AM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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My female chow chow when we lived in Alaska had a regular visit from a fox for a winter. He would yoodle at my dog who would bark back then get a mouth full of dog food which she would walk over to the fence and lay it down for the fox to eat.
I think Disney made a movie out of that. Awww.
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Old 10-24-2012, 04:49 AM
Sahirrnee Sahirrnee is online now
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If it's allowed where you live you could try fireworks to drive the owls away.
One of the neighborhoods down the road did that when they were overtaken by a flock of buzzards. You could see the buzzards though, so you knew where they were.
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Old 10-24-2012, 07:48 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is online now
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Owls are way cool, and unlike cats they don't crap all over the yard.

We have some around here, and there are nights you can hear them hooting back and forth. "Kittens here....good eats....who-hoo-hoo".
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