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  #1  
Old 12-01-2012, 05:43 AM
PlainJain PlainJain is offline
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Holy crap! I just got...

That Beatles is a play on words.
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  #2  
Old 12-01-2012, 07:09 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
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Memo to Jain: Doobie Brothers? Not really brothers.
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  #3  
Old 12-01-2012, 07:23 AM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Did a guy on a flaming pie tell you?
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  #4  
Old 12-01-2012, 07:29 AM
Kasper1014 Kasper1014 is offline
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Just for educational purposes....how so?

Ok, I never knew that. Always assumed it was a variation of the spelling of "beetles".
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  #5  
Old 12-01-2012, 07:38 AM
Nunzio Tavulari Nunzio Tavulari is offline
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The Beatles was a play on Buddy Holly's band, The Crickets. To extend the musical pun, beEt was replaced with beAt.
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  #6  
Old 12-01-2012, 08:26 AM
Snerky Snerk Snerky Snerk is offline
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I thought they were messing with Ringo by painting The Beatles(s) on his drum kit.
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  #7  
Old 12-01-2012, 08:37 AM
Joey P Joey P is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nunzio Tavulari View Post
The Beatles was a play on Buddy Holly's band, The Crickets. To extend the musical pun, beEt was replaced with beAt.
I was just going to mention something about Bill Haley and his Comets when I (swear to god) just realized that it's a play on Halley's Comet.
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  #8  
Old 12-01-2012, 08:41 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Any second the OP is going to realize the Kinks didn't name themselves after a twisted-up piece of thread.
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  #9  
Old 12-01-2012, 08:49 AM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is online now
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Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
That Beatles is a play on words.
They needed a name that was witty at first, but that seemed less funny each time you heard it.
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  #10  
Old 12-01-2012, 09:09 AM
lawoot lawoot is offline
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Of course the Beat-Alls is also a play on words.
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  #11  
Old 12-01-2012, 09:34 AM
JKellyMap JKellyMap is online now
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But did you know that the Rutles aren't about being stuck in a rut or something, but rather derive from "Rutland TV," which I think was a joke made-up TV station named for an absurdly small English county (rather like if Saturday Night Live's fake newscast were from "national Rhode Island network" or some such).
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  #12  
Old 12-01-2012, 10:25 AM
PlainJain PlainJain is offline
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Originally Posted by Kasper1014 View Post
Just for educational purposes....how so?

Ok, I never knew that. Always assumed it was a variation of the spelling of "beetles".
What Nunzio said. I was responding to another thread where I was writing it out. I did a quick online search to see if it was "Beatles" or "The Beatles". I had written it so many times in a short period that it started looking weird to me. And as was really looking at it, it came to me. Mercy Beat and all that.
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  #13  
Old 12-01-2012, 10:27 AM
Ximenean Ximenean is offline
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Originally Posted by JKellyMap View Post
But did you know that the Rutles aren't about being stuck in a rut or something, but rather derive from "Rutland TV," which I think was a joke made-up TV station named for an absurdly small English county (rather like if Saturday Night Live's fake newscast were from "national Rhode Island network" or some such).
That's the gist of it, yes. The full version is that the Rutles orginally appeared as part of Eric Idle's show Rutland Weekend Television, the title of which was a play on "London Weekend Televison", a major TV company of the time. Rutland was a small county that had recently been absorbed into a neighboring county, and so was something of a byword for insignificance. As you surmise, the joke was to act as if this little backwater had the same degree of cultural significance as London.
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  #14  
Old 12-01-2012, 10:38 AM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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I was around during all the years the Beatles were together. And I have to admit, it never occurred to me that the name contained the word "beat" until sometime in the '70s. And yes, the group was formed during the later years of the "beat" generation.
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  #15  
Old 12-01-2012, 10:56 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is online now
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Originally Posted by lawoot View Post
Best. Episode.

EVAR!
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  #16  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:16 AM
DMark DMark is offline
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I think it was season 3 or 4 of Friends when Phoebe was standing in front of their favorite cafe, Central Perk and said something like, "Central Perk - Central Park...I just got that!"

Made me laugh.
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  #17  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:26 AM
Quimby Quimby is offline
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I never really thought of it until it came up in the movie That Thing You Do.
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  #18  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:27 AM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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I didn't "get it" about the Beatles until that Simpsons episode about the Be Sharps (B#'s) in which Homer says something about having a clever, play on words name for their barbershop group that got steadily less amusing the more often you saw/heard it.

Last edited by Dendarii Dame; 12-01-2012 at 11:27 AM..
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  #19  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:39 AM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Huh, all this time I'd just assumed it was the British spelling of the word, comparable to the idiosyncratic pronunciations of "aluminum" and "jaguar".
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  #20  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:41 AM
Uncle Jocko Uncle Jocko is offline
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I never really thought of it until it came up in the movie That Thing You Do.
"And now, here they are ... the OhNeeders!"
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  #21  
Old 12-01-2012, 12:03 PM
Loach Loach is offline
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Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
What Nunzio said. I was responding to another thread where I was writing it out. I did a quick online search to see if it was "Beatles" or "The Beatles". I had written it so many times in a short period that it started looking weird to me. And as was really looking at it, it came to me. Mercy Beat and all that.
Mersey beat. River Mersey in Liverpool. Not mercy.
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  #22  
Old 12-01-2012, 12:20 PM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Okay so which is it?

Beetles, or

Beat - 'ls?
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  #23  
Old 12-03-2012, 09:11 AM
Shakester Shakester is offline
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Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
Huh, all this time I'd just assumed it was the British spelling of the word, comparable to the idiosyncratic pronunciations of "aluminum" and "jaguar".
Correct, not "idiosyncratic". Also you spelled Aluminium wrong.
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  #24  
Old 12-03-2012, 09:16 AM
Ludovic Ludovic is offline
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Originally Posted by levdrakon View Post
Okay so which is it?

Beetles, or

Beat - 'ls?
Yes.
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  #25  
Old 12-03-2012, 09:57 AM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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My son just informed me that Think Geek's tagline, "for the smart masses" is supposed to be funny, like, "for the smart-asses." I just thought it was homage to us, the smart ones — as opposed to the unwashed masses, who don't understand such interesting and allusive gadgets.

Although, of course, I am a smart-ass of long standing, so I suppose that works too.

Last edited by Ellen Cherry; 12-03-2012 at 09:57 AM.. Reason: Punctuation. It saves lives.
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  #26  
Old 12-03-2012, 10:30 AM
kunilou kunilou is online now
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Originally Posted by Shakester View Post
Correct, not "idiosyncratic".
When I was in college, my English literature prof insisted on pronouncing the name of the protagonist in Byron's poem as Don Joo-ahn rahter than Dohn Hwahn. He insisted that because Byron was English, and it was a fictional character, that the anglicized version was "correct."

We then asked if Byron had consulted with Tirso deMolina, who had written the first account of the Don Juan legend nearly two centuries before Byron, but it was not a productive conversation.
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  #27  
Old 12-03-2012, 10:33 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Originally Posted by kunilou View Post
When I was in college, my English literature prof insisted on pronouncing the name of the protagonist in Byron's poem as Don Joo-ahn rahter than Dohn Hwahn. He insisted that because Byron was English, and it was a fictional character, that the anglicized version was "correct."

We then asked if Byron had consulted with Tirso deMolina, who had written the first account of the Don Juan legend nearly two centuries before Byron, but it was not a productive conversation.
IIRC, it doesn't scan right if you pronounce it "Don Hwahn." We learned the same in high school, and it was pretty clear that "Don Joo-ahn" was the correct way to pronounce it for the poem.

ETA: And here's the verse that clearly demonstrates it:

Quote:
Till, after cloying the gazettes with cant,
The age discovers he is not the true one;
Of such as these I should not care to vaunt,
I'll therefore take our ancient friend Don Juan
ETA2: Oh, and a thread discussing the topic.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-03-2012 at 10:35 AM..
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  #28  
Old 12-03-2012, 02:38 PM
cjepson cjepson is offline
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And yes, the group was formed during the later years of the "beat" generation.
I always used to think that the Beat Generation was called that because of the beat of the music they listened to. I was kind of taken aback when I learned it originally meant "beaten down".

Anyway, stuff like the OP describes is always happening to me. Like realizing that an elbow is called that because when you bend your arm it looks like the letter...

Last edited by cjepson; 12-03-2012 at 02:40 PM..
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  #29  
Old 12-03-2012, 03:17 PM
kunilou kunilou is online now
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
IIRC, it doesn't scan right if you pronounce it "Don Hwahn." We learned the same in high school, and it was pretty clear that "Don Joo-ahn" was the correct way to pronounce it for the poem.

ETA: And here's the verse that clearly demonstrates it:
Byron wasn't the first or last poet who torutred a rhyme!
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  #30  
Old 12-03-2012, 03:32 PM
Rollo Tomasi Rollo Tomasi is offline
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Don't feel bad. It's only been a few days since I realized that Kay Jewelers' slogan, "Every Kiss Begins with Kay," is also a play on words.
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  #31  
Old 12-03-2012, 03:34 PM
Alka Seltzer Alka Seltzer is offline
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Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
That Beatles is a play on words.
I didn't realise for years either, as it never really registered that beetle was spelt incorrectly.
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  #32  
Old 12-03-2012, 03:56 PM
appleciders appleciders is offline
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Originally Posted by Rollo Tomasi View Post
Don't feel bad. It's only been a few days since I realized that Kay Jewelers' slogan, "Every Kiss Begins with Kay," is also a play on words.
Damn it. I hate that tagline, it's always stuck in my head. Now it'll be worse.
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  #33  
Old 12-03-2012, 05:00 PM
Aquadementia Aquadementia is offline
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Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
That Beatles is a play on words.
A pun! You just destroyed music for me!

I guess not. They're still just as amazing.
I don't think I ever gave it any thought before either.
But then again, the band is older then me.
I've got to wonder if I was 30 when I first heard of them if I would have been like
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo Tomasi View Post
Don't feel bad. It's only been a few days since I realized that Kay Jewelers' slogan, "Every Kiss Begins with Kay," is also a play on words.
Oh, I see. And I was thinking it was about prostituting yourself for bling.
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  #34  
Old 12-03-2012, 05:06 PM
drewtwo99 drewtwo99 is offline
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It took me until me until a year or two ago that I realized that the In-sink-erator brand of garbage disposals is a play on the word incinerator. I always just thought it was an erator inside your sink, whatever an erator was (I guess I started to think of what an erator must be, something to get rid of stuff I guess, kind of like an incinerator, and then... OHHHHHH).

Last edited by drewtwo99; 12-03-2012 at 05:08 PM..
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  #35  
Old 12-04-2012, 12:30 PM
cjepson cjepson is offline
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Originally Posted by Rollo Tomasi View Post
Don't feel bad. It's only been a few days since I realized that Kay Jewelers' slogan, "Every Kiss Begins with Kay," is also a play on words.
I liked Jay Leno's take on this: "I think the guys in those commercials are hoping for something that begins with F."
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  #36  
Old 12-04-2012, 12:45 PM
Ximenean Ximenean is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rollo Tomasi View Post
Don't feel bad. It's only been a few days since I realized that Kay Jewelers' slogan, "Every Kiss Begins with Kay," is also a play on words.
I liked Jay Leno's take on this: "I think the guys in those commercials are hoping for something that begins with F."
Kay Jewelers (formerly Chuck's) .
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  #37  
Old 12-04-2012, 01:48 PM
Amateur Barbarian Amateur Barbarian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Ekers View Post
Huh, all this time I'd just assumed it was the British spelling of the word, comparable to the idiosyncratic pronunciations of "aluminum" and "jaguar".
Would that be 'jag-you-are' or 'jag-wire'?
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  #38  
Old 12-04-2012, 02:42 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is online now
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It took me a long time to notice the double meaning of Bender's name in Futurama.
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  #39  
Old 12-04-2012, 02:57 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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It was pretty late in my life when I learned the difference between monkeys and Monkees. One is a group of hairy animals that make amusing noises. The other live in trees.
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  #40  
Old 12-04-2012, 03:38 PM
WordMan WordMan is online now
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Not quite what the OP is looking for, but in the U.S., there was a popular 80's ska / new wave band called The English Beat. In the UK, they go by The Beat; they added "English" because apparently there was another band in the U.S. that went by The Beat.

Once I knew that they were really The Beat, I couldn't help but focus on how close their name was to The Beatles - like, wow, pretty risky for them to take on a name that might be confused with the Fabs. But, The (English) Beat are a truly great band that sound nothing like The Beatles, so I think it is just my issue
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  #41  
Old 12-04-2012, 03:46 PM
Ximenean Ximenean is offline
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Once I knew that they were really The Beat, I couldn't help but focus on how close their name was to The Beatles - like, wow, pretty risky for them to take on a name that might be confused with the Fabs. But, The (English) Beat are a truly great band that sound nothing like The Beatles, so I think it is just my issue
Nah, nobody made any connection between their name and that of the Beatles. Kids of that time in the UK only had a vague idea of who the Beatles were. I know, I was one of them (the kids, that is, not the Beatles).
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  #42  
Old 12-04-2012, 04:24 PM
JSexton JSexton is offline
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Originally Posted by Ximenean View Post
Kay Jewelers (formerly Chuck's) .
Didn't the Simpsons have Bee Jewelers? I'll leave their implied slogan as an exercise for the reader.
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  #43  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:34 AM
furryman furryman is offline
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Just the other day I realized the series name Highway To Heaven was probably a parody of the song Highway To Hell.
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  #44  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:43 AM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
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Just the other day I realized the series name Highway To Heaven was probably a parody of the song Highway To Hell.


And Victor French was AC/DC's original lead singer!




No, wait, that was Bon Scott. Never mind.




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  #45  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:44 AM
Floater Floater is offline
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Originally Posted by Nunzio Tavulari View Post
The Beatles was a play on Buddy Holly's band, The Crickets. To extend the musical pun, beEt was replaced with beAt.
But they started off as The Silver Beetles, though.
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  #46  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:52 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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But they started off as The Silver Beetles, though.
No, they started as the "Beatals," then briefly became "The Silver Beetles," (with "Silver Beats" and "Silver Beatles" thrown in the middle there somewhere.)and finally settled on "Beatles."

Ah, here's a run-down:

March 1960 - Stu Sutcliffe comes up with "Beatals," riffing on Buddy Holly and the Crickets

c. May 5 1960 - They become The Silver Beetles

May 14 1960 - (for one day only) billed as The Silver Beats

early July 1960 - change spelling to Silver Beatles

c. Aug 16 1960 - settle on The Beatles
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  #47  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:56 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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Originally Posted by Aquadementia View Post
Oh, I see. And I was thinking it was about prostituting yourself for bling.
That's what all jewelry commercials are about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
What Nunzio said. I was responding to another thread where I was writing it out. I did a quick online search to see if it was "Beatles" or "The Beatles". I had written it so many times in a short period that it started looking weird to me. And as was really looking at it, it came to me. Mercy Beat and all that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
Not quite what the OP is looking for, but in the U.S., there was a popular 80's ska / new wave band called The English Beat. In the UK, they go by The Beat; they added "English" because apparently there was another band in the U.S. that went by The Beat.

Once I knew that they were really The Beat, I couldn't help but focus on how close their name was to The Beatles - like, wow, pretty risky for them to take on a name that might be confused with the Fabs. But, The (English) Beat are a truly great band that sound nothing like The Beatles, so I think it is just my issue
Quote:
Originally Posted by Floater View Post
But they started off as The Silver Beetles, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nunzio Tavulari View Post
The Beatles was a play on Buddy Holly's band, The Crickets.
Just FYI, there's no need to capitalize the thes in these sentences, even if it's part of the proper name. It's perfectly correct to refer to the Beatles, the Crickets, the English Beat, etc.

Last edited by Acsenray; 12-05-2012 at 08:56 AM..
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  #48  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:21 AM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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I can forgive the OP for not getting the pun before.
Long ago, "Beatles" essentially became its own definition. Whetever the boys intended it to mean in the first place, what it means now is... them.
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  #49  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:28 AM
levdrakon levdrakon is offline
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Elvis and the Beatles were two things my mom just couldn't understand I had no interest in. I was born in '64 and was vaguely aware of hippies and Beatles and Beach Boys but by the time I was old enough to care about music those acts were ancient history. Anything over ten years old was ancient history to me. The 60's. WWI. Medieval Europe. Jesus. Dinosaurs. All ancient history to me.
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  #50  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:51 AM
Wheelz Wheelz is offline
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I can forgive the OP for not getting the pun before.
Long ago, "Beatles" essentially became its own definition. Whetever the boys intended it to mean in the first place, what it means now is... them.
Here's what I was looking for: It means its own thing now. (Not so much for Fountains of Wayne...)
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