The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > Cafe Society

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-05-2012, 07:47 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Have you seen King Kong (1933)?

...and if so, what did you think?


I casually asked around our office about this, and was surprised at how many people hadn't sen it at all, or had only seen bits of it, or had only seen it once.


When I was growing up it was on WOR channel 9 in New York all the time, usually on Million Dollar Movie, often twice in a row. Later, they broadcast it, along with Son of Kong and Mighty Joe Young, on Thanksgiving, because they couldn't compete with the parades and Football that ran on the big stations. After the cut scenes were restored around 1970, the film showed up again at art houses. With the appearance of cable TV, it filled the inexhaustable maw of programming. Then it showed up when VHS became available. It was colorized and broadcast, then released on VHS, then on DVD.

It figures as a cultural icon -- the big ape atop the Empire State Building, or holding blonde Fay Wray in one hand. The release of remakes in 1976 and 2005 brought re-showings of the original. For cyin' out loud, they even made an awful sequel with Linda Hamilton.


So I was surprised to find out how little the film was viewed where I work, especially given that I'm in a highly technical field, which tends to have more than its share of geeks. And this isn't strictly a n age thing -- there are older folks who hadn't seen it either, although this does seem more likely to be younger folks who haven't watched the orighinal Kong.


So -- who hasn't seen the 1933 Kong all the way through, even once?

Last edited by Colibri; 12-05-2012 at 11:27 AM.. Reason: fix coding
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 12-05-2012, 07:51 AM
madmonk28 madmonk28 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
I loved that movie as a kid. I'm 46 and it was often on Saturday afternoons in the 70s.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-05-2012, 07:55 AM
salinqmind salinqmind is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
I'm way old, so of course I've seen more movies on TV than the young might, and I've seen King Kong many many times. I don't care for the remakes, there's no 'magic' there.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-05-2012, 07:55 AM
CandidGamera CandidGamera is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
I've seen it, but it was a challenge to do so. As part of my self-imposed Mandatory Movie challenge, I sought out every movie on IMDB's top 250 list (then) and the various AFI top 100 lists.

King Kong was a bitch to trick down. I found a well-worn VHS copy (used) at Eide's Entertainment in Pittsburgh. Of course, a few years later, when the Peter Jackson movie came out, the original Kong finally got a DVD release.

The hardest movies on the list to see were Harold Lloyd's Safety Last, and the Freshman. But Kong was up there.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:02 AM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is online now
Not a real doctor.
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Nolensville, TN
Posts: 6,221
I'm 42, and I have fond memories of watching it with my Granddaddy when I visited him in 1978.

After the Peter Jackson remake came out, my wife bought me the Collector's edition DVD, which I watched with my oldest son. He was captivated by it.

It still holds up, even though some (nearly all) of the portrayals of the inhabitants of Skull Island are horribly outdated and rather racist.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:03 AM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Yes, I've seen it many times. Kong's fur, which seems to have a life of its own, endlessly fascinates me,
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:06 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
One of the greatest movies of all time. Merian Cooper was a genius. I've seen King Kong many, many times. I'm generally offended by the remakes. They remind me of child copying a Rembrandt in crayon.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:07 AM
Student Driver Student Driver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
I'm 38. Seen it multiple times. TV showings in the 70s and 80s, got the Criterion laserdisc in the 90s, saw it a few times in revival theaters in the early 2000s, and got the DVD box set when it was released (tin box, paper goodies, and individually cased copies of King Kong, Son of Kong, and Mighty Joe Young).
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:09 AM
Rollo Tomasi Rollo Tomasi is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Seen it and loved it. I'm only 26, but my local Hollywood Video (RIP) had a pretty good selection of classic movies on both VHS and DVD, and I remember renting this one several times. I think the first time I rented it, I watched it five times, once a day for each day that the rental was good for. Great movie.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:11 AM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
Rich as a Lannister
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Near Eskippakithiki
Posts: 11,270
I'm in the "only once" camp; I saw it as a teenager after the Jeff Bridges/Jessica Lange remake came out and I was terribly disappointed. (I was in love with ol' Jeff for years after that and still have a weakness for scientists with long hair )

Anyway, at the time I had a typical teen view that it was horribly outdated and hokey, and I couldn't stand the scenes on the island where Kong fought the giant snakes, etc. Also, the portrayal of the natives was distracting.

I wouldn't mind seeing it again with the more sophisticated view of earlier filmmaking that now possess. I'm sure I would appreciate it a lot more.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:16 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandidGamera View Post
I've seen it, but it was a challenge to do so. As part of my self-imposed Mandatory Movie challenge, I sought out every movie on IMDB's top 250 list (then) and the various AFI top 100 lists.

King Kong was a bitch to trick down. I found a well-worn VHS copy (used) at Eide's Entertainment in Pittsburgh. Of course, a few years later, when the Peter Jackson movie came out, the original Kong finally got a DVD release.

The hardest movies on the list to see were Harold Lloyd's Safety Last, and the Freshman. But Kong was up there.
the bolded part is a surprise to me. How long before 2005 was this? Most video stores possessed copies of the VHS version. The DVD didn't come out until 2005, but it was available after that. It's got to be on Netflix. I'd be very surprised if services like Comcast didn't have it in their library. There must have been a zillion copies available through the internet.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-05-2012, 08:16 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry View Post
(I was in love with ol' Jeff for years after that and still have a weakness for scientists with long hair )
A lot of people say Jeff Bridges looks like me, so ... How you doin'?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:14 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Southern Pennsylvania
Posts: 21,600
I saw it when I was very young and I loved it(but I loved all monster movies back then.)
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:15 AM
RikWriter RikWriter is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
I am 46 and used to watch it on TV all the time as a kid. I loved it then and still have a soft spot for it.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:36 AM
blondebear blondebear is online now
Shouting Grasshopper
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Meridian/280
Posts: 10,416
I've see the 1933 version many times. I had a giant poster/wall mural of Kong in my first apartment.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:43 AM
silenus silenus is online now
Hoc nomen meum verum non est.
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 41,165
Repeatedly, not only on TV but as a featured film in a college class.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:48 AM
Quimby Quimby is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 1999
Countless times. It is one of my favorite movies. I also watched it every Thanksgiving growing up (did a thread about it here).

For me it is like Star Wars, where I can just keep watching it over and over and never tire of it.

For the record I don't like any of the remakes although the one from a few years back had its heart in the right place, it was just too slow and boring.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:49 AM
Jonathan Chance Jonathan Chance is offline
Domo Arigato Mister Moderato
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: On the run with Kilroy
Posts: 16,634
I've seen it several times. But I think you're right that it's harder to accidentally see that sort of film these days. More channels, more focused channels, lead people away from "I wonder what's on" viewing.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:51 AM
bup bup is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
I'm 47 and have only seen parts of it.

I love old movies, but somehow I've never seen this one.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:53 AM
CandidGamera CandidGamera is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
the bolded part is a surprise to me. How long before 2005 was this? Most video stores possessed copies of the VHS version. The DVD didn't come out until 2005, but it was available after that. It's got to be on Netflix. I'd be very surprised if services like Comcast didn't have it in their library. There must have been a zillion copies available through the internet.
Circa 2001. None of the video stores near me had it, never saw it available on cable. Ordering off of the internet I considered a last resort - because it usually meant paying collector prices.

Last edited by CandidGamera; 12-05-2012 at 09:54 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 12-05-2012, 09:55 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
King Kong plays several times a year on Turner Classic Movies. They also have documentaries on Merian Cooper and the making of the film. I don't recall precisely, but they either ran the entire film Grass: A Nation's Battle for Life, or clips of it, Cooper's first film. His biography is impressive.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:00 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: At the Diogenes Club
Posts: 49,060
I think I've only seen the 1933 original once, in a TV rebroadcast around the time the Jeff Bridges/Jessica Lange remake came out. I've seen excerpts from it a dozen or so times. I remember thinking it was quaint and the sfx were laughable, but for its time it was pretty good. I sort of liked each of the Kong movies in different ways, but none are on my personal Top Ten or even Top Fifty movie lists, and I'm in no hurry to see any of them again.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:01 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
It is indeed. If you get a chance, read Goldner and Turner's The Making of King Kong. (The boook has been reprinted in an incomplete form in recent yearsm, under a different title). Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack really did the life of Carl Denham. going out into the wild and shooting the films in the mountains and jungles. Grass was basically a documentary, shot on location. The backer of the film (a feisty woman whose own bio would be an interesting read) insisted on going along as well as they filmed the migration that forms the basis of the film. She wasn't abducted by a giant ape, but she DID break her tooth on the rock-hard bread the natives ate.

The genius of the imagery, though, was Willis O'Brien and his crew. They had already made The Lost World and were working on the never-finished Creation, a lot of which ended up in King Kong. Cooper's original idea was to use real gorillas and Komodo dragons. If they'd done that, and it worked enough to get a film out of, the result would be a curiosity only known to film historians. O'Brien made it a pop culture phenomenon.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:30 AM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 12,614
Yep. Seen it.

Coincidentally, three years earlier, there was a movie Ingagi, which also featured a gorilla-worshipping jungle tribe that sacrificed women to him. No indication that Cooper and Wallace were familiar with this movie, but ya never know. This gorilla was apparently normal sized, but since I've never seen the movie, I can't attest to that.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:33 AM
Leaffan Leaffan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
No, but you could probably ask that about any movie and my answer would be "no."
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:37 AM
Meurglys Meurglys is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 1,863
I've seen it several times, but only on tv. Great stuff.
I liked the Peter Jackson one well enough when I saw it in the cinema but I've only watched fragments of it since and I finally saw the Jeff Bridges one recently and thought it was dreadful!
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:38 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 59,186
I've seen it a few times, including once in a theatre.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:38 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Snake-Hips Tucker View Post
Yep. Seen it.

Coincidentally, three years earlier, there was a movie Ingagi, which also featured a gorilla-worshipping jungle tribe that sacrificed women to him. No indication that Cooper and Wallace were familiar with this movie, but ya never know. This gorilla was apparently normal sized, but since I've never seen the movie, I can't attest to that.
It was I've heard of the film, but not seen it. There was also a comedy, otherwise unrelated, called Son of Ingagi that came out later.


There are several things that have been suggested as inspirations for Kong, including an H. Rider Haggard story, and the part of Gulliver's Travels where Gulliver is captured by the Brobdingnagian mokey and taken up on the roof. There's no evidence that Cooper and Schoedsack were familiar with any of them. The plot of Kong strongly resembles one of their earlier films with a Mystery Animal (which turns out to be a baby elephant)

Last edited by CalMeacham; 12-05-2012 at 10:39 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:43 AM
hogarth hogarth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
I'm 38 and I've only seen it relatively recently (on TV), probably around the time the 2005 remake came out. It holds up pretty well. I probably had the opportunity to watch it on TV as a kid, but the idea of watching old monster movies didn't grab me at the time.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:51 AM
Clothahump Clothahump is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 11,478
Loved it. Even after all these years, it still holds up. I'll watch it every chance I get.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:03 AM
panache45 panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 22,956
I've seen it several times. The best was with my overly-sensitive ex, who had to leave the room in horror when the ape was abused . . . not even at the good part yet.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:05 AM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 35,707
It took me until I was in college that I was able to see it; WOR didn't run it at any particular time and it wasn't until I was home in the summer when they ran it in August late at night.* Loved it at the time.

I went back to it more recently, and it held up beautifully. A truly great film.

*The same time frame they ran It's a Wonderful Life, which is why I never considered it a Christmas movie.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:21 AM
Leaffan Leaffan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Nemo View Post
I've seen it a few times, including once in a theatre.
You're a lot older than I thought.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:31 AM
Colibri Colibri is online now
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 26,063
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
When I was growing up it was on WOR channel 9 in New York all the time, usually on Million Dollar Movie, often twice in a row.
It would be on for a whole week at a time, every weekday night and several times in a row on weekends. When I was a kid, I watched it as many times as I possibly could. I've probably seen it 50 times. I also saw the restored version once in a theater when they reissued it in the 1970s.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:33 AM
Simplicio Simplicio is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
I saw it in the run-up to the 2005 film. I liked it more then I thought I would. Pretty incredible how well they did the "creatures" given the tech and budget limitations of the time.

(I really liked the 2005 version as well).

Last edited by Simplicio; 12-05-2012 at 11:33 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:43 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Oogah Boogah!

Its a blast to watch this old classic. The "natives" of skull island are a hoot-they look like the usual extras in blackface. Not too much atention paid to their "language" though!
Fay Wray can really faint on command! Technically, the animation was pretty good for 1933-did it really scare kids back then?
The modern remakes are worthless.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:53 AM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Smack Dab in the Middle
Posts: 10,994
I've seen the original, the 1976 de Laurentiis-produced remake and the '05 Peter Jackson remake; all on TV. Odd, since I'm not really a giant ape fan, or fan of giant apes.

The original isn't exactly one of my all-time favorite flicks, but IMO it stands as an early icon of the vast potential of film to show us things that couldn't have been shown effectively in another entertainment form. Neither of the later films seem to add much of anything to the premise, other than more sophisticated special effects. Even there, I give the original extra credit for accomplishing as much as it did with the primitive effects tools available to the filmmakers, sort how I'm more impressed with the abilities of a B-17 bomber than a modern jetliner.

I do have to say that I have a strange attraction to the female leads in all three films. Fay Wray, Jessica Lange, and Naomi Watts: rowwrr.

Last edited by El_Kabong; 12-05-2012 at 11:54 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:53 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
Its a blast to watch this old classic. The "natives" of skull island are a hoot-they look like the usual extras in blackface. Not too much atention paid to their "language" though!
Fay Wray can really faint on command! Technically, the animation was pretty good for 1933-did it really scare kids back then?
The modern remakes are worthless.
According to the Goldner and Turner book (and other sources), people did react to Kong, with women fainting at the Roxy. We've become more used to these things, and jaded.


I disagree about "not too much attention being paid to the language". The studio demanded "translations" of the language, to ensure that it wasn't obscene, or something. It does appear to be used consistently, and IIRC uses genuine bits of languages from the South Pa cific/indonesian region. Ruth Rose, the major scriptwriter*, was Schoendsack's wife, and had gone with them on some of their shoots. The language isn't merely random shouting. Some excerpts are printed in Goldner and Turner, and some DVDs transliterate it.



*Officially there were several writers. Edgar Wallce, the first credited, was ca major mystery writer of the time. It'd be as if Peter Jackson had Stephen King write the screenplay for his remake. Unfortunnsately, Wallace came out to Hollywood to write the script, caught pneumonia, and died. He didn't actually contribute much. James Creelman's next effort was too slow-moving and talky. It was largely Ruth Rose's version that got to the screen.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 12-05-2012, 11:56 AM
Push You Down Push You Down is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
33-- can't remember when I first saw it. Probably on AMC or TCM. I definitely taped it off tv (as well as "Son of Kong")from one of those channels.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12-05-2012, 12:04 PM
jsc1953 jsc1953 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Loved it when I first saw it as a kid; love it now, decades later. I'll drop by and watch it whenever I happen to see that it's playing. Especially if I'm in time for the whole abduction of Fay Wray - tied to the altar -- bang the gong -- arrival of Kong scene, which is absolutely breathtaking and spellbinding.

If I turned on my signature, you would see that it reads "O tara vay, rama Kong".

The Peter Jackson remake is ok...but the thing I loved about it: the theater scene, where they stage a "recreation" of the native village, with music and choreography, looks nothing like the village that we saw earlier in the movie. It is, though, a complete recreation of the 1933 version, with the same costumes and music.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 12-05-2012, 12:28 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
I bought it on laser disc about 20 years ago. it's the restored version with several censored scenes put back in. Kong came out just after the Hays Code was adopted in 1930. They removed a couple scenes for violence and a brief scene of Fay Wrey swimming nude.

Great film. I've watched it at least 5 times.

Last edited by aceplace57; 12-05-2012 at 12:31 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 12-05-2012, 12:31 PM
BobLibDem BobLibDem is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Saw it several times, including as part of a college class. Some of the Kong scenes are great and though the animation is primitive by today's standards, they still managed to put a lot of life in the ape. Love the part where he shakes the snake to make sure it's dead, also where he runs his finger over Fay Wray and then smells it. I think the original is better than any remake.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 12-05-2012, 12:47 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobLibDem View Post
Saw it several times, including as part of a college class. Some of the Kong scenes are great and though the animation is primitive by today's standards, they still managed to put a lot of life in the ape. Love the part where he shakes the snake to make sure it's dead, also where he runs his finger over Fay Wray and then smells it. I think the original is better than any remake.
One thing I didn't realize for many years, until it was pointed out to me, is that it's not a snake Kong fights in the cave -- it's an elongated plesiosaur-type creature. It has a long and supple neck and tail (which wrap around Kong like a snake's), but if you pay close attention it has a somewhat fatter middle body, with four flippers.

http://images.search.yahoo.com/image...mb=G.kSrW0OssH
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 12-05-2012, 12:54 PM
BobLibDem BobLibDem is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
One thing I didn't realize for many years, until it was pointed out to me, is that it's not a snake Kong fights in the cave -- it's an elongated plesiosaur-type creature. It has a long and supple neck and tail (which wrap around Kong like a snake's), but if you pay close attention it has a somewhat fatter middle body, with four flippers.
Son of a gun, that's right! Gotta give props to the filmmakers, given the more limited knowledge of prehistoric creatures that they had.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 12-05-2012, 01:14 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
I saw it as a child. I thought it was a bit scary in parts. I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as the Godzilla pictures.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 12-05-2012, 01:16 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobLibDem View Post
Son of a gun, that's right! Gotta give props to the filmmakers, given the more limited knowledge of prehistoric creatures that they had.
The first complete plesiosaur skeleton was discovered over a century before.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 12-05-2012, 01:20 PM
Baker Baker is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Tottering-on-the-Brink
Posts: 14,709
I've seen it at least a couple dozen times. All things considered, the effects hold up rather well. Willis O'Brien was a genius, and his pupil, Ray Harryhausen, loved this film

One little thing I heard on a documentary once, it is arguably the first film with sound that matched soundtrack to action on the screen. Watch the scene where the Skull Islander chief stalks down the steps and you'll see what I mean.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 12-05-2012, 01:24 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Western New York
Posts: 59,186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
You're a lot older than I thought.
Well, it wasn't the original theatrical run. I saw it in a college theatre.

Although I am old enough that I saw the 1976 remake during its original theatrical run.

Last edited by Little Nemo; 12-05-2012 at 01:26 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 12-05-2012, 01:29 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dendarii Dame View Post
The first complete plesiosaur skeleton was discovered over a century before.
And the gorilla had not been proven to exist until 1847. Before then it was considered mythical.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 12-05-2012, 01:47 PM
stegon66 stegon66 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Seen it more than a few times. Great movie!
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.