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  #1  
Old 12-06-2012, 09:30 AM
Unauthorized Cinnamon Unauthorized Cinnamon is offline
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Do you hate it when authors write out dialects?

I'm reading Cloud Atlas. I like some of the stories, others are just OK, but I'm willing to read through and get the whole experience.

Well, I was willing, until I hit the central tale, told completely in dialect. Soon I found myself skimming through, looking for plot points, and finally I gave up and read a synopsis of the chapter. I just can't wade through this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zachry
Old Georgie’s path an’ mine crossed more times’n I’m comfy mem’ryin, an’ after I’m died, no sayin’ what that fangy devil won’t try an’ do to me
for a whole chapter. It hurts my eyeballs and my brain.

I understand the motivation, but for me, the speaker's style could be conveyed through folksy words (of actual English) and simple sentence structure. I really, really hate trying to decipher a phonetic rendering of patois. And all those apostrophes just make me shudder. Would it not be sufficient to write "Old Georgie's path and mine crossed more times than I'm comfy remembering"?

I remember the last time I tried to read Dracula I stalled out on the dialog with the old man at the docks for the same reason. I have the feeling it was meant to be hilarious, but it's just fucking annoying to me.

Maybe I'm just too lazy a reader. I know Cloud Atlas is supposed to be challenging to the reader, and that's part of its charm. But when does "challenging the reader" cross over into hostility to the reader? Maybe I could slog through these passages for a class, but for pleasure reading I just won't put myself through it.
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  #2  
Old 12-06-2012, 09:33 AM
JohnT JohnT is online now
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Yes, I found the dialects made Huckleberry Finn almost unreadable to me back in high school. There's no need to have 8 different spellings of the same word in the same book, imho.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:51 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
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It depends. It can be an effective way of getting into the feel of a place if done properly. I liked Heinlein's "lunar" dialect in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, and fell into it pretty easily. I didn't have an issue with it in Huckleberry Finn.


But I absolutely hate it when I can't make sense of a character unless I sound out every single word. The worst offender I've come across is the original printing of Joel Chandler Harris' Uncle Remus. Reading it was torture.

Last edited by CalMeacham; 12-06-2012 at 09:55 AM..
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:51 AM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is online now
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I had trouble with Huckleberry Finn when I tried to read it as a kid, after reading and liking Tom Sawyer, but when I got older, the dialect wasn't that much of an obstacle, and Twain does it pretty readably once you get into the groove. There are some writers from around that era who are much, much worse, like Joel Chandler Harris's Uncle Remus stories, or Finley Peter Dunne's Mr. Dooley writings—I lack the patience to read that stuff. I was surprised that the OP's example was from a modern book; I thought that sort of thing had gone out of fashion.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:56 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
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Simulcast!
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:58 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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That part of Cloud Atlas stopped me dead.

I like to get lost in a book and that can't happen if I need to sound out every word and try to decide what it's supposed to mean and then have to put the whole sentence together afterward, again and again and again.

Thudlow, there are lots of modern books which do this, from A Clockwork Orange to Riddley Walker to a lot of Toni Morrison. We even did a thread about them a few years ago.

Huckleberry Finn works because Twain was a genius. There aren't many of those.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:04 AM
Rollo Tomasi Rollo Tomasi is online now
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Dear God, I hate this so, so much. Maybe it just means I can't recognize the poetry of language or something. But Cloud Atlas, Huck Finn, Their Eyes Were Watching God, parts of The Red Badge of Courage . . . it's hugely distracting. I sometimes had to read long stretches of dialogue out loud to figure out what the hell anyone was talking about. The only reason I got through it in Cloud Atlas was because I knew the book was going to be going back to readable prose after about eighty pages.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:06 AM
SpazCat SpazCat is offline
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It depends on if I know the dialect. Most Southern American dialects don't give me a problem, or if they do I can just say them and I figure it out pretty quickly. Scottish dialects stop me cold. I have no earthly idea how to pronounce half of those words and I just end up skimming. For some reason I have no problem with Yorkshire. I guess it's because one of my favorite books growing up was The Secret Garden which is almost a primer on Yorkshire dialect. I can breeze through Wuthering Heights with no problem now thanks to TSG.
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  #9  
Old 12-06-2012, 10:06 AM
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The only time the dialect stuff annoys me is when it doesn't read to me like it's supposed to sound (e.g. a character is supposed to be Irish, but if I sound out the dialect writing it sounds like Martian).
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:07 AM
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I generally agree with CalMeacham on this point.

The bit that really annoys me is when an author gets so into writing dialect that they take words that properly aren't spelled the way they're said and spell them the way that most people say them.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:16 AM
Scumpup Scumpup is offline
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I sho' nuff do.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:22 AM
Student Driver Student Driver is online now
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Irvine Welsh uses Scottish dialect for much of the dialogue in his books, and I enjoy it. I do have some friends who vehemently disagree with me on it, though.

Overall, if the dialect has a sense of realism or at least seems to be internally consistent (not being Scottish, I have no idea if Mr. Welsh is accurate or not, but he's consistent in usage), I tend to like it. My one exception would be the folksy dialect James Whitcomb Riley used in his stories and poems... can't stand that.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:25 AM
Malthus Malthus is online now
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I like it, if it adds atmosphere and is well done.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:25 AM
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I like it actually, it's difficult to read at first but it really develops a character. Especially for children's books like Redwall.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:28 AM
Rollo Tomasi Rollo Tomasi is online now
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One thing that really bugs me about spelling out dialects is when it's used inconsistently among characters. For example, if you read a book with a character from Mississippi, one from Pennsylvania, and one from California, but only the character from Mississippi is having their dialogue spelled out phoenetically. Not only does it come off as condescending, but it inadvertently holds up the other characters' way of speaking as the "normal" way. After all, people from those two states have their own quirky way of pronouncing certain things Why aren't those words being spelled out phonetically? But because people more strongly associate the South with a particular accent (and probably because the author is not from the South), they feel the need to practically hold up a sign and say, "Hey, this person is from the South! See, that's why he's talking funny!"
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:33 AM
RikWriter RikWriter is offline
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I don't like it at all. I prefer when the author makes a brief mention (preferably from the POV of a character who doesn't share the accent) noting that the person has a strong accent and then just leaves it to your imagination.
As an instance that comes to mind, in the book Island in the Sea of Time, one of the 1200 BC locals named Isketerol has just learned to speak English and has a strong accent. Rather than write out everything he says with this accent, Stirling briefly mentions that when he says "That would take years," it comes out sounding like "Dat wud tikka yee-ars," but writes the rest of his dialogue conventionally.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:35 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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I hate it so much and it makes me want to throw a book out the window. I feel actual rage at this. I stopped reading Tai-Pan because major plot sensitive page long conversations were in pigdin. It was awful and I was furious. They'd be talking about murders and horrid things all in the "You no likee" type of format.

I posted a paragraph here once, nearly incomprehensible. I will never try to read the book again.

Here I found one:

"Cow chillo out! Plenty quick-quick, savvy?" Struan said.
"You want cow chillo, heya? Cow chillo plenty good bed jig-jig. Two dollar never mind," the girl called out.

Cow chillo means young woman. Every major dialogue between Chinese and American characters was like that. It's pretentious and it's annoying.

Last edited by Anaamika; 12-06-2012 at 10:37 AM..
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2012, 10:37 AM
Gordon Urquhart Gordon Urquhart is offline
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Robert Louis Stevenson's Thrawn Janet (there's an online version of it here) is a really horrifying story. It took about the fourth time I read it and could actually understand what happened in the story to recognize it as such, though. I think the Scottish dialect adds to the overall impact of the story, but it's a lot of work to get through it.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:43 AM
Balance Balance is offline
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It rarely bothers me, as long as it's not completely impenetrable. It can be used effectively to develop a character, or to show changes in a character, but it's rarely necessary. For the most part, handling it the way RikWriter describes is fine: establish that the character has an accent or dialect different from other characters, then only reference it if it's relevant.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:57 AM
Unauthorized Cinnamon Unauthorized Cinnamon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
I like it, if it adds atmosphere and is well done.
Actually, in the same book, the Sonmi chapters arguably use a dialect. But it didn't piss me off, because the odd words were used sparingly enough that they gave you a feel for the society/character without intruding unduly. It didn't bother me at all to read "lite," and "thru" because they were comprehensible while really supporting the whole corporate culture idea. It took me a few pages to realize that "Xultation" was "exultation," and so forth, but it was easy to plug in to all the "ex-" words from then on. But the Zachry language was just too dense!

I also prefer the technique of describing the person's accent, then writing their words in normal English.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:00 AM
JohnGalt JohnGalt is offline
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I'm another one who can't get started on Huckleberry Finn because of the dialog. I wish there was a "sanitized" version written in regular speech to help me out - I'd love to actually read the entire book.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:01 AM
NotherYinzer NotherYinzer is offline
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What really twists my nipples is when the author throws in terms or phrases in another language and doesn't bother to give pronunciations. How do you pronounce sgian dubh? Can't you just say "sock knife?" And how about the end of The Name of the Rose? I slogged through that whole damn book only to find the last phrase is in Latin!
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  #23  
Old 12-06-2012, 11:33 AM
DeweyDecibel DeweyDecibel is offline
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There's a knack to writing it that some authors have, others don't. I've run across dialect that was so bad I refused to (or couldn't) read it. However, in the hands of a good author, I like it. Cloud Atlas is an example of it done well, in my opinion. The genius of that section is that you don't have to catch every word, you can just read and it kind of washes over you and makes sense eventually. Try too hard and you miss it, but just read it and it flows. Kind of like listening to dialog in a movie with strong accents - at first it confuses you, but then it clicks.

Oddly enough, the only part of Cloud Atlas I had trouble with was the Adam Ewing (1860s sailor) part. No idea why that one was hard for me as opposed to Sonmi or Zachry.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:58 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Student Driver View Post
Irvine Welsh uses Scottish dialect for much of the dialogue in his books, and I enjoy it. I do have some friends who vehemently disagree with me on it, though.

Overall, if the dialect has a sense of realism or at least seems to be internally consistent (not being Scottish, I have no idea if Mr. Welsh is accurate or not, but he's consistent in usage), I tend to like it. My one exception would be the folksy dialect James Whitcomb Riley used in his stories and poems... can't stand that.
You want Scottish dialect? Robert Louis Stevenson wrote stories in it, and I've read works by more recent authors copying him. Utterly unitelligible (if you're not Scottish) without a glossary.


Don't believe me? Try reading Thrawn Janet:

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Thrawn_Janet
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:17 PM
Dublin11 Dublin11 is offline
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I cannot stand it. Unless the author is from the same part of the world a me, his phonetic rendering of even a bog standard word will not be the same as mine for the same word. And if the author is doing his phonetic rendering of slang term that I don't even know when it's spelt properly I tend to lose interest pretty damn quick.

Huckleberry Finn and Wuthering Heights were both required reading for English literature when I was at school. A whole class of baffled kids in the back end of Ballymacnowhere in rural Ireland trying to decipher not only the decidedly foreign Huck from the Deep South of America, with his odd phrases, but also the equally foreign mumbly Joseph from the North East of England with his strange terminology.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:56 PM
Infovore Infovore is offline
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I normally don't like written-out dialect in novels, because I find it annoying and condescending (and often racist, especially when it's done with black or Asian characters).

That said, though, I did quite like Chuck Palahniuk's Pygmy, which was written entirely in very strange English. Not sure if you'd call it "dialect" per se, but it definitely took some getting used to.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:58 PM
SpazCat SpazCat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dublin11 View Post
Huckleberry Finn and Wuthering Heights were both required reading for English literature when I was at school. A whole class of baffled kids in the back end of Ballymacnowhere in rural Ireland trying to decipher not only the decidedly foreign Huck from the Deep South of America, with his odd phrases, but also the equally foreign mumbly Joseph from the North East of England with his strange terminology.
Try reading Caribbean books written with Creole dialect. I had a book of Caribbean short stories once that was actually pretty good--except that two-thirds of the stories consisted of dialogue written in various Creoles. Not just from one island, either, from many islands. None of these countries speak the same Creole.

The used bookstore wouldn't take that book. I ended up donating it to Goodwill.
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:07 PM
Malthus Malthus is online now
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Originally Posted by Unauthorized Cinnamon View Post
Actually, in the same book, the Sonmi chapters arguably use a dialect. But it didn't piss me off, because the odd words were used sparingly enough that they gave you a feel for the society/character without intruding unduly. It didn't bother me at all to read "lite," and "thru" because they were comprehensible while really supporting the whole corporate culture idea. It took me a few pages to realize that "Xultation" was "exultation," and so forth, but it was easy to plug in to all the "ex-" words from then on. But the Zachry language was just too dense!

I also prefer the technique of describing the person's accent, then writing their words in normal English.
Well, I loved Cloud Atlas and consider Huckleberry Finn a masterpiece, so maybe I'm not the best audience for this argument.

I'd be sad if works of literature are "made easier to read" by rendering them in colloquial English. Part of their value as unique works would be lost. Sure, not everyone is going to like it, but not everyone has to like it. There is still plenty of stuff out there that can be enjoyed that is dialect-free.
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  #29  
Old 12-06-2012, 01:18 PM
Morbo Morbo is offline
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Another form of this that I absolutely despise is when authors, usually in a Sci Fi setting, have characters that are using some form of text communication so they start abbreviating in ALL CAPS right there in the book. I can barely tolerate it when I get a text like that IRL - having to wade through it to receive plot points is infuriating.

Here's an example from The Algebraist:
Quote:
WHT DID U FND?
DNT NO XCTLY. I NO RLZE AT TIME. OL CAME OUT MUCH L8TR WHN JELTCK DID ANLYS. SMTHNG ABT THIS 2ND SHIP & THNG CALLD A TRANSFORM, SPSD 2 MAK RST OF DWLR LIST MEAN SMTHNG. JLTCK SNT FLEET 2 TRY FIND. NO FIND. FLT WRKD.
She felt him pause, tense. She sent:
WOT?
ALGDLY THIS ALSO Y BYNDRS WRKD PORTL. TRU?
DNT NO. I JST A MSG GRL. She paused. SO U SAY NOT ONLY U START THIS MRGNCY, U COSD LAST 1 2 & GOT PRTL DSTRYD?
YS. GES I JST ACCDNT PRN.
FKNG HEL.
Yes, I can read it. No, I shouldn't have to. The author can simply say they were coding secret texts to each other and continue normally. Why make me do heavy lifting?

Oddly, when the shape of the text itself is used as an important plot point, as in The Stars My Destination, I'm cool with it. But the example above just seems like nothing more than an annoyance.
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  #30  
Old 12-06-2012, 01:20 PM
Thudlow Boink Thudlow Boink is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post
I'm another one who can't get started on Huckleberry Finn because of the dialog. I wish there was a "sanitized" version written in regular speech to help me out - I'd love to actually read the entire book.
Have you tried listening to an audio version?
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:37 PM
Hershele Ostropoler Hershele Ostropoler is offline
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A few touches, that's all. Enough to get the idea across. Any more than that and you're being condescending.

Besides, that's only how the writer would spell those sounds. In other words, it might not work if the reader's accent isn't the same as the writer's.
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:48 PM
Roderick Femm Roderick Femm is offline
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Yes, I hate it. In general, people write dialects very badly. I can't read Sir Walter Scott any more because of all the "dinna fash yursel" and similar stuff.

It might sometimes be important to the plot to indicate that characters are speaking different dialects, such as to indicate cultural or class differences that are relevant. But I believe this can be done more subtly than Sir Walter and other writers have done.


Roddy
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  #33  
Old 12-06-2012, 02:00 PM
LawMonkey LawMonkey is online now
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Originally Posted by Sitnam View Post
I like it actually, it's difficult to read at first but it really develops a character. Especially for children's books like Redwall.
Oddly, the moles' accent always sort of bugged me there, because I couldn't figure out how the heck it was supposed to sound. A critical lack of exposure to the relevant English accent. When I went to a signing and saw Jacques do it live, it made perfect sense. Same for hearing it live on an audiobook.

Generally I find the writing-out of dialect/accent more irritating than not. It's a case by case thing, though--I got used to it in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and had no problems that I recall with Twain. On the other hand, the original Uncle Remus stories are basically unreadable unless translated.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:12 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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When I first read Gone With The Wind at age 15, I had to skip over most of the slaves' dialects. Even now, it's very hard reading.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:13 PM
tanstaafl tanstaafl is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morbo View Post
Another form of this that I absolutely despise is when authors, usually in a Sci Fi setting, have characters that are using some form of text communication so they start abbreviating in ALL CAPS right there in the book. I can barely tolerate it when I get a text like that IRL - having to wade through it to receive plot points is infuriating.

Here's an example from The Algebraist:
Yes, I can read it. No, I shouldn't have to. The author can simply say they were coding secret texts to each other and continue normally. Why make me do heavy lifting?

Oddly, when the shape of the text itself is used as an important plot point, as in The Stars My Destination, I'm cool with it. But the example above just seems like nothing more than an annoyance.
Iain Banks likes that for some reason. Don't try reading Feersum Endjinn, a third of the book is like this...
Quote:
Woak up. Got dresd. Had brekfast. Spoke wif Ergates thi ant who sed itz juss been wurk wurk wurk 4 u lately master Bascule, Y dont u ½ a holiday? & I agreed & that woz how we decided we otter go 2 c Mr Zoliparia in thi I-ball ov thi gargoyle Rosbrith.

Last edited by tanstaafl; 12-06-2012 at 02:13 PM..
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  #36  
Old 12-06-2012, 02:16 PM
jsgoddess jsgoddess is offline
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I hate it. My beloved Dickens does it, and the entire middle third of Martin Chuzzlewit was torture because of it.

It's especially bad when you just can't imagine someone saying a word a particular way. Dickens loves to have his illiterate characters say "creetur" instead of creature. But how do you pronounce that? Who would pronounce it that way by hearing it instead of reading it? He's probably going for some subtlety that's beyond me, but still!
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:23 PM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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I re-read Huck Finn a couple of years ago, I believe. I know it was after I hit 50. I found it to be very uneven.

And the accents, for the most part, were a distraction for me. I live in Texas, and grew up here, so I'm used to hearing a Southern (more or less) accent. Now, I'm sure that pronunciation and usages have changed, but I feel that Twain was going overboard with the dialect. Yes, yes, I UNDERSTAND that Huck needed to be presented as an unschooled, nearly-feral child who was actually pretty smart, but trying to slog through the various accents led me to put the book aside many times, and I had to force myself to go back to the book. Same thing with some of the Lord Peter Wimsey stories...sometimes Sayers sets the story in the Highlands, or she has a Scot with a lot of dialog, and I just get frustrated with not understanding the words and how they're pronounced and used.

I first read The Moon is a Harsh Mistress when I was in junior high or high school, and had no problem with grasping the speech mannerisms of the main character, and the general Loonie accent. I also had no problem grasping the slang of Stand on Zanzibar, to name another one.

I think that the difference is that in some stories, the author assumes that the reader is familiar with the accent and slang, and in other stories, the author is careful to put enough exposition into the story so that the reader can extrapolate the meaning without a dictionary.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:33 PM
TV time TV time is offline
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Twain, Ambrose Bierce, or Bret Hartt actually were pretty popular in their time because of their ability to depict accents or dialects in their stories and books. It doesn't wash today, Perhaps it says quite a bit about their time.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:42 PM
Lynn Bodoni Lynn Bodoni is offline
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I was watching one of the Shrek movies, and thinking that while it's pretty good for now, it's probably not going to stand the test of time, because of all the pop culture references that will fade away with time.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:43 PM
Ephemera Ephemera is offline
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The only thing I hate more than written dialect is poems or songs in prose.
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Old 12-06-2012, 02:45 PM
Malthus Malthus is online now
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Originally Posted by TV time View Post
Twain, Ambrose Bierce, or Bret Hartt actually were pretty popular in their time because of their ability to depict accents or dialects in their stories and books. It doesn't wash today, Perhaps it says quite a bit about their time.
People don't like Bierce or Twain these days? Far as I know, both are still considered greats, and still read (by some at least) with pleasure. Twain especially. Though "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and "The Devil's Dictionary" are commonly cited.

Not familiar with Bret Hartt.
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  #42  
Old 12-06-2012, 03:15 PM
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I just named my parent's new cat "Finn". 'Nuff said.
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  #43  
Old 12-06-2012, 03:30 PM
Jophiel Jophiel is online now
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In Richard Adams' The Plague Dogs, there is a fox who has a thick Geordie accent. Each time he spoke, it slowed the story to a crawl for me as I tried to puzzle out what was being said.

Later I found out that my US version had the "lightened" accent for us American readers and the UK publication was even worse.
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  #44  
Old 12-06-2012, 04:16 PM
phouka phouka is offline
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
You want Scottish dialect? Robert Louis Stevenson wrote stories in it, and I've read works by more recent authors copying him. Utterly unitelligible (if you're not Scottish) without a glossary.


Don't believe me? Try reading Thrawn Janet:

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Thrawn_Janet
Heh. Just goes to show. I followed your link and read the whole thing and loved it.
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  #45  
Old 12-06-2012, 04:31 PM
Chronos Chronos is online now
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In Richard Adams' The Plague Dogs, there is a fox who has a thick Geordie accent. Each time he spoke, it slowed the story to a crawl for me as I tried to puzzle out what was being said.
The edition I had had footnotes explaining the dialect, and I definitely needed them.

In general, I think that writing out dialects can be a great tool, if used well, but that most authors can't use it well, and it comes out horrible. Off the top of my head, I liked it in Twain's works and in The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, but I can't think of any other examples.
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  #46  
Old 12-06-2012, 04:51 PM
LawMonkey LawMonkey is online now
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Richard Adams also did a bit of dialect in Watership Down, some good, some bad. Kehaar's accent never bothered me, and the one or two lines that Blackavar spoke with an Efrafan accent were very mild.

On the other hand, the human farmer(s) who shoot Hazel? "'e old woild rabbit!" *shudder* I have to force myself through that section every time I read the book.
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  #47  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:44 PM
singular1 singular1 is offline
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The first thing that sprung to mind for me is Steven King's cringe-inducing dialects, especially black dialects. They physically hurt me to read them.
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  #48  
Old 12-06-2012, 07:52 PM
Student Driver Student Driver is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
You want Scottish dialect? Robert Louis Stevenson wrote stories in it, and I've read works by more recent authors copying him. Utterly unitelligible (if you're not Scottish) without a glossary.


Don't believe me? Try reading Thrawn Janet:

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Thrawn_Janet
Just woke up, getting ready to go to work, but I'll attempt this one when I get out of work... (or on lunch break if no one takes lunch with me). I'll find out just how much Scots I can stand, I guess.
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  #49  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:27 PM
Loach Loach is offline
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Originally Posted by singular1 View Post
The first thing that sprung to mind for me is Steven King's cringe-inducing dialects, especially black dialects. They physically hurt me to read them.
It's Stephen.

Anyway, I could not get through Delores Claiborne. Heavy backwoods Maine dialect made even worse because it was written first person as a monologue.
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  #50  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:33 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
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It just depends on what the accent is and how well it's done. Huckleberry Finn wasn't a problem. I've read some books where this technique was laborious. It's probably overused, but not inherently a problem.
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