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  #1  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:12 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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Where can I buy land for cheap?

Suppose I wanted to take $1000 and buy as much land as possible. Where would that be? The only requirement is that I could get a valid deed (or local equivalent) that is recognized by the official government and there's a good chance it won't be seized by the government on a whim. I still hold out hope that I can buy Bir Tawil for $2 ($1 for Eqypt and $1 for the Sudan).
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  #2  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:48 PM
Mr Downtown Mr Downtown is offline
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Perhaps because I'm putting too much emphasis on the deed/seizure part, I think first of the Australian Outback, Northern Canada, or useless chunks of Nevada.
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  #3  
Old 03-20-2013, 10:51 PM
Oly Oly is offline
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Baltic and Mediterranean.
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  #4  
Old 03-20-2013, 11:05 PM
UDS UDS is offline
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You may have the problem that countries with viable and dependable land registration systems may also have laws which prevent you from subdividing landholdings into unviably small plots, and - particularly if your $1000 is to be inclusive of registration fees, transaction taxes, etc - you may not be able to buy an amount of land which they are willing to subdivide as a distinct title. I'm pretty sure you'd have this problem in Australia, at any rate. You won't get a small plot of land unless it has been zoned under the planning laws for the kind of development/use for which a small plot would be viable, and if it has that zoning then even the smallest plot will cost considerably more than $1,000.

Having said that, last year you could buy a house for just one pound in a run-down street in Stoke, in England. The catch is that you had to accept an obligation to renovate the house (for which a low-interest load was also offered) and to live in it for five years before you could on-sell. So your total outlay would considerably exceed $1,000.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...st-street.html
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  #5  
Old 03-20-2013, 11:51 PM
deltasigma deltasigma is offline
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Atacama desert in Chile. And if you play your cards right, you might be able to call the POLARBEAR telescope your neighbor.
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  #6  
Old 03-20-2013, 11:59 PM
LawMonkey LawMonkey is offline
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Well, I have some rubbish land in Tennessee, or rather my mom does. We'd quite like to be rid of it... :P
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  #7  
Old 03-21-2013, 12:01 AM
robert_columbia robert_columbia is offline
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Previous thread on the same or a closely related topic:

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=630201
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  #8  
Old 03-21-2013, 09:01 AM
Colophon Colophon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oly View Post
Baltic and Mediterranean.
Say what? I'm pretty sure land on the Mediterranean is pretty damn expensive, by global standards. There's also the added fun element that in certain places, e.g. Spain, lots of the land never had the right permits etc and can be seized right back, or at least have the buildings on it razed. Or in Cyprus you might find that the family who owned it before the Turkish occupation come knocking at your door with the deeds to "your" land....
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:15 AM
dolphinboy dolphinboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Say what? I'm pretty sure land on the Mediterranean is pretty damn expensive, by global standards. There's also the added fun element that in certain places, e.g. Spain, lots of the land never had the right permits etc and can be seized right back, or at least have the buildings on it razed. Or in Cyprus you might find that the family who owned it before the Turkish occupation come knocking at your door with the deeds to "your" land....
This is a vailed reference to the game Monopoly I think...
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  #10  
Old 03-21-2013, 09:18 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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Buy land around the "Salton Sea"..in the California desert. Some day, it will be like present day Palm Springs.
There is plenty of cheap/worthless land available. But most of it is far away from civilization. My theory is that as energy prices rise, it is going to get harder and harder to live out in the sticks-unless you want to live like a Mountain man
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  #11  
Old 03-21-2013, 12:47 PM
ThisOneGuy ThisOneGuy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
Perhaps because I'm putting too much emphasis on the deed/seizure part, I think first of the Australian Outback, Northern Canada, or useless chunks of Nevada.
A while back a cousin of mine was able to buy a few acres of Utah desert for around $20 in back taxes, the previous owner had abandonded it, so he saw it online and went to the tax sale.
Not quite a salt flat, but from the pictures it is periodically flooded (judging by the look of the soil). I don't think it would be possible grow anything but salt brush on it. Nothing stopping you from building on it if you wanted to, but no roads within a mile or so.
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  #12  
Old 03-21-2013, 12:55 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oly View Post
Baltic and Mediterranean.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Say what? I'm pretty sure land on the Mediterranean is pretty damn expensive, by global standards.
'tis a joke, but you'd have to have played the US version of Monopoly to get it.
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  #13  
Old 03-21-2013, 02:46 PM
Oredigger77 Oredigger77 is offline
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I just saw land for sale in Wyoming for $250 an acre, let me see if I can pull it up. But those kind of prices on small lots would be difficult.
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  #14  
Old 03-21-2013, 03:07 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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Why do some of you assume I want a small lot. I'm talking $1/ac of Libyan sanddunes in the Sahara or 5000 acres of beautifaul Siberian tundra.
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  #15  
Old 03-21-2013, 03:30 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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If you want to move to a one-horse town in Kansas, they'll just give it to you. Comes with a few caveats, though (you have to build house on it, and possibly live there for a year or two). There are similar programs all throughout "flyover country."
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  #16  
Old 03-21-2013, 04:24 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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I don't think a 100' x 150' lot that I have to build on qualifies as lots of land or cheap.
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  #17  
Old 03-21-2013, 05:47 PM
scr4 scr4 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
Why do some of you assume I want a small lot.
Maybe because you mentioned a $1000 figure in the OP?
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  #18  
Old 03-21-2013, 06:10 PM
tellyworth tellyworth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
think first of the Australian Outback
I think you'll find Australian land prices are comparatively high. Knock yourself out.
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  #19  
Old 03-21-2013, 06:55 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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Originally Posted by scr4 View Post
Maybe because you mentioned a $1000 figure in the OP?
But that is in the US. What would $1000 buy in Chad or the Gobi Desert?
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  #20  
Old 03-21-2013, 07:31 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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The Gobi Desert is mostly not privately owned, and the Chinese government isn't going to sell you vast tracts of it for $1 an acre.

The problem with buying vast tracts of land in the third world is that land titles often aren't very clear. There are people who might live on certain land, and feel they have a right to the land, but don't have formal title to the land other than the fact that their ancestors lived there. Or there are laws or customs that forbid the alienation of land.

And there is unused "worthless" land, but that land is typically owned by the government and they aren't selling. Or it's owned by some rich oligarch, who also isn't selling. Poor people who might be tempted by the offer of a thousand bucks don't have thousands of acres to sell, and even if they did they need the land to live on.
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  #21  
Old 03-21-2013, 10:29 PM
Mr Downtown Mr Downtown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tellyworth View Post
I think you'll find Australian land prices are comparatively high.
When I said Outback I was thinking of the Red Centre, not coastal Queensland.
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  #22  
Old 03-22-2013, 12:24 AM
VOW VOW is offline
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Your first problem will be citizenship. Some countries do not allow non-citizens to own land. Hell, some countries don't believe in private ownership of land, at all!

Second problem: what do you want to do with the land? It could come with all sorts of restrictions that make it worthless. And property taxes could make it LESS than worthless, if you're just gonna get a helluva bill every year.

Then, of course there are the physical aspects of the land itself. Is it underwater for part of the year? ALL of the year? Is it sitting on top of a radioactive dump? Is it vertical? Is it landlocked?


~VOW
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  #23  
Old 03-22-2013, 01:39 AM
Shakester Shakester is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Downtown View Post
When I said Outback I was thinking of the Red Centre, not coastal Queensland.
The Australian outback is very valuable land. A lot of that sparsely-populated (not "empty") arid scrubland (ie not a trackless waste of sand dunes) is sitting on top of vast mineral deposits. It's also valuable as pasture for livestock. It's also valuable as national parkland, ie world heritage environments.

The Australian outback is only empty and worthless in American imaginations, in the real world it's owned, populated, and vital to Australia's economy. I do not doubt that there's plenty of land in the US available for far less than any land in Australia.

Last edited by Shakester; 03-22-2013 at 01:39 AM..
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