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  #1  
Old 04-03-2013, 01:57 AM
JARojas4244 JARojas4244 is offline
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Urgent Homework Help!

I'm in desperate need for some clarification on this essay question. I do not really follow politics nor have I had government in over two years either.

Contrast the role of the president and the US Senate in terms of their ability to affect the national security agendas of the United States? Which institution has more power? Why?

Thanks in advance for any answers/replies.
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  #2  
Old 04-03-2013, 02:10 AM
Scholar Beardpig Scholar Beardpig is offline
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We don't give homework help here, my friend. You will find your time better served doing original research, rather than refreshing this page.
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  #3  
Old 04-03-2013, 06:02 AM
bot3 bot3 is offline
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The OP isn't asking for us to do the assignment but only some insight.
That said, I'm no expert nor Ron I follow politics much either.
FWIW...the Pesident by virtue his power and resources can yeild a bit more power. However, the Senate if working as a unit can counter or make policy and over-ride a President.
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  #4  
Old 04-03-2013, 06:59 AM
Shakes Shakes is online now
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Heh, I actually know this one.
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  #5  
Old 04-03-2013, 07:39 AM
PacifistPorcupine PacifistPorcupine is offline
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Posted at 3am... let me guess, due today?
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  #6  
Old 04-03-2013, 08:13 AM
Johnny Bravo Johnny Bravo is online now
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Can you clarify your request for clarification? What part of this question is giving you problems? This is a pretty straightforward question. You need to look at:

1) The President's national security role.
2) The Senate's national security role.

The question is only asking you to contrast, so that's pretty straightforward.

The second part asks for your opinion on who has more power. So long as you back up your argument with good data, I'm sure you'll do fine.
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Old 04-03-2013, 08:31 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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The first step would be to go to the original source, the Constitution, and see what powers are set out for the President and for Congress (and for the Senate specifically, but most of the powers are shared between the two houses). The next step would be to dig up the history of various national security actions to see how those designated powers have actually played out. Be on the especial lookout for cases where the President and the Senate wanted different things, and who got their way (or more of their way) in those cases.
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Old 04-03-2013, 08:31 AM
Enginerd Enginerd is offline
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Dude's not coming back - his last activity was 3 minutes after Scholar Beardpig's post.
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  #9  
Old 04-03-2013, 10:10 AM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Originally Posted by bot3 View Post
The OP isn't asking for us to do the assignment but only some insight.
Really? He's asking for "answers".

But it's a really interesting question. I'll do some research and get back to you (OP) in a few days.
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  #10  
Old 04-03-2013, 10:13 AM
silenus silenus is online now
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Mr. Rojas, I assigned the even questions on page 281, not the odd ones. Please re-read the syllabus before doing the assignment.
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  #11  
Old 04-03-2013, 10:30 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Since this is about agendas and not actions there's no answer. It's up to the particular president and senate and their efforts to set or affect an agenda. That's what Checks and Balances is about, denying ultimate power to any branch of government. It all plays out in the mix.

Last edited by TriPolar; 04-03-2013 at 10:30 AM..
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  #12  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:22 AM
AClockworkMelon AClockworkMelon is offline
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Originally Posted by JARojas4244 View Post
I'm in desperate need for some clarification on this essay question. I do not really follow politics nor have I had government in over two years either.

Contrast the role of the president and the US Senate in terms of their ability to affect the national security agendas of the United States? Which institution has more power? Why?

Thanks in advance for any answers/replies.
Beardpig is right in that we don't normally help people do their homework, but I've taken pity on you, and I'm making an exception in your case.

First of all you need to understand that the President needs a 3/4th majority vote in the senate in order to pass laws, but any laws he passes can be vetoed by the FFDCA. That being said, the Cabinet of Representatives doesn't need approval in order to issue commands to the military, even without a formal declaration of war made by the Supreme Court, which is why the United States hasn't officially been at war since the Hundred Years War. So in terms of contrasting their respective powers, the Senate is really more of a collection of figureheads, whereas the President and his War Cabinet are the real drivers of security policy. Overall I'd say the President has the more power, though the 1975 Access to Information Act did siphon some of that away from the position. Hope this helped.
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  #13  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:27 AM
elucidator elucidator is offline
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You are an awful, awful person. Come sit over here with the rest of us.
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  #14  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:30 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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Originally Posted by AClockworkMelon View Post
Beardpig is right in that we don't normally help people do their homework, but I've taken pity on you, and I'm making an exception in your case.

First of all you need to understand that the President needs a 3/4th majority vote in the senate in order to pass laws, but any laws he passes can be vetoed by the FFDCA. That being said, the Cabinet of Representatives doesn't need approval in order to issue commands to the military, even without a formal declaration of war made by the Supreme Court, which is why the United States hasn't officially been at war since the Hundred Years War. So in terms of contrasting their respective powers, the Senate is really more of a collection of figureheads, whereas the President and his War Cabinet are the real drivers of security policy. Overall I'd say the President has the more power, though the 1975 Access to Information Act did siphon some of that away from the position. Hope this helped.
But what about the influence of the 1959 Senate Enchiridion of Memes and Kennedy's subsequent citation of it in support of the pre-emptive Bay of Pigs counterstrategy? Surely this must be considered.
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  #15  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:35 AM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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And what's the role of the Electrical College?
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  #16  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:37 AM
YogSosoth YogSosoth is offline
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You forgot to mention that in case of a tie, Joe Biden, as president pro temp of the Senate, has to bareknuckle box any representatives from the other side in order to cast his tie-breaking vote.
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  #17  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:39 AM
AClockworkMelon AClockworkMelon is offline
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And what's the role of the Electrical College?
Even I have trouble remembering what it's for, but I do know that it's made up of Electric Counts.
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  #18  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:44 AM
Celidin Celidin is online now
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Originally Posted by AClockworkMelon View Post
Even I have trouble remembering what it's for, but I do know that it's made up of Electric Counts.
No, no, remember - the electoral college is where Senators go during their first 2 years of their 12 year term to learn how to be a senator and earn their BS degree.*






This is where the term for the degree a lot of college grads get started back in 1776 with the signing of the Declaration of Independence - it was enshrined into law in that document. It was only after this point that other colleges and universities stole the idea of granting their graduates a "BS" degree, to make them seem equal to the senators.

Last edited by Celidin; 04-03-2013 at 11:48 AM..
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  #19  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:50 AM
AClockworkMelon AClockworkMelon is offline
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No, no, remember - the electoral college is where Senators go during their first 2 years of their 12 year term to learn how to be a center and earn their BS degree.
We weren't talking about the Electoral College. Looks like those years of remedial civil engineering were wasted!
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  #20  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:53 AM
lieu lieu is offline
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*raises hand*

May I please be excused?
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  #21  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:54 AM
Celidin Celidin is online now
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Oh looks like I've gone and failed reading comprehension 101. Probably qualifies me to advance to the 2nd trimester of the electoral college
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  #22  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:54 AM
Johnny Bravo Johnny Bravo is online now
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Sorry, I'm lost. Does anyone know how to get from this thread to the Mornington Crescent tube station?
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  #23  
Old 04-03-2013, 11:59 AM
Celidin Celidin is online now
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Oh that's easy. Take a right out of the parking lot, go one block. Turn right, go one block. Turn right, go one block. Go right again for one more block, then turn right and the driveway should be on your right.
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  #24  
Old 04-03-2013, 12:22 PM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Originally Posted by YogSosoth View Post
You forgot to mention that in case of a tie, Joe Biden, as president pro temp of the Senate, has to bareknuckle box any representatives from the other side in order to cast his tie-breaking vote.

I think you meant: "pro temprarium".
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  #25  
Old 04-03-2013, 12:36 PM
elucidator elucidator is offline
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When the conversation gets around to where the Defenestration at Prague is relevant, wake me up. I remember that one. Cost my folks about ten grand, but I remember.
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  #26  
Old 04-03-2013, 12:47 PM
Ludovic Ludovic is online now
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I think you meant: "pro temprarium".
Doesn't that mean "people who don't like tipping"?
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  #27  
Old 04-03-2013, 01:27 PM
YogSosoth YogSosoth is offline
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I think you meant: "pro temprarium".
Its actually short for "Professional Templeton", because the first Senator pro temp was a guy named Templeton and he did fight any Senators from the other side who wanted to prevent him from casting his vote. Its how the Whig party died out, because he was a professional boxer, and beat many of those in the Whig party to death during his term
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  #28  
Old 04-03-2013, 01:42 PM
Enginerd Enginerd is offline
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Also, because he was in favor of keeping baby turtles in glass tanks for short periods of time.

Last edited by Enginerd; 04-03-2013 at 01:42 PM..
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  #29  
Old 04-03-2013, 02:21 PM
Darth Panda Darth Panda is offline
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Originally Posted by AClockworkMelon View Post
We weren't talking about the Electoral College. Looks like those years of remedial civil engineering were wasted!
The Electrical College has no bearing on National Security unless Order 66 is enacted.

At that point in time, all of the Elector Counts nominate 1 representative and a second, who recess into the Quid Pro Quorum.

The Quorum is a modern expression of democracy by combat, which is why seconds negotiate with one another without the direct involvement of the Elector's representative.

The back and forth lasts for a few days, and ultimately two drafted amendments to the NSA's Combined Cyber Crime, False Flag, and Amber Alert Protocols are presented to the Electors' represetative for a majority vote on one or the other.

According to the Treaty of Westphalia, a faithless Elector may be summarily defenestrated, but they can be offered protection by another Elector Count, under Lutheran tradition.

Last edited by Darth Panda; 04-03-2013 at 02:25 PM..
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  #30  
Old 04-03-2013, 03:51 PM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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Shouldn't that be the Treaty of Wasilla?
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  #31  
Old 04-03-2013, 04:23 PM
Heart of Dorkness Heart of Dorkness is online now
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No, though the two are often confused. The Treaty of Wasilla (aka the Palin-Putin Accord) pertains to international relations, and implies (rather controversially, I might add) that mere proximity necessarily imparts hetero-political erudition.
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  #32  
Old 04-03-2013, 05:00 PM
Andy L Andy L is offline
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Originally Posted by AClockworkMelon View Post
Beardpig is right in that we don't normally help people do their homework, but I've taken pity on you, and I'm making an exception in your case.

First of all you need to understand that the President needs a 3/4th majority vote in the senate in order to pass laws, but any laws he passes can be vetoed by the FFDCA. That being said, the Cabinet of Representatives doesn't need approval in order to issue commands to the military, even without a formal declaration of war made by the Supreme Court, which is why the United States hasn't officially been at war since the Hundred Years War. So in terms of contrasting their respective powers, the Senate is really more of a collection of figureheads, whereas the President and his War Cabinet are the real drivers of security policy. Overall I'd say the President has the more power, though the 1975 Access to Information Act did siphon some of that away from the position. Hope this helped.
Are you familiar with Laura K "Krishna"? (http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2.../31/plagiarize)
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  #33  
Old 04-03-2013, 06:23 PM
Darth Panda Darth Panda is offline
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Originally Posted by Heart of Dorkness View Post
The Treaty of Wasilla (aka the Palin-Putin Accord) pertains to international relations, and implies (rather controversially, I might add) that mere proximity necessarily imparts hetero-political erudition.
Not to be confused with the Treaty of Walla Walla, which is a mutual defense pact against drop bears.
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  #34  
Old 04-04-2013, 08:29 AM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Originally Posted by Heart of Dorkness View Post
No, though the two are often confused. The Treaty of Wasilla (aka the Palin-Putin Accord) pertains to international relations, and implies (rather controversially, I might add) that mere proximity necessarily imparts hetero-political erudition.
And it's important to remember that it's "hetero", not that other thing.
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  #35  
Old 04-04-2013, 09:44 AM
drewtwo99 drewtwo99 is offline
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Can anyone help me compare and contrast the roles of NAMBLA and the FDIC in modern society please?
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  #36  
Old 04-04-2013, 10:06 AM
Folly Folly is offline
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Can anyone help me compare and contrast the roles of NAMBLA and the FDIC in modern society please?
Sure one protects your bondles and bucks while the other likes to fondle and ...

Ok. that's the best rhyme I could come up with, sue me.
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Old 04-04-2013, 10:08 AM
Gyrate Gyrate is offline
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Not to be confused with the Treaty of Walla Walla, which is a mutual defense pact against drop bears.
That's the Treaty of Wagga Wagga. The Treaty of Walla Walla was never ratified as half the delegates died of dysentery on the way to Walla Walla, a common fate back then for travellers on the Oregon Trail.
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  #38  
Old 04-04-2013, 10:55 AM
elucidator elucidator is offline
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Not enough ammo.
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Old 04-04-2013, 11:39 AM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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That's the Treaty of Wagga Wagga. The Treaty of Walla Walla was never ratified as half the delegates died of dysentery on the way to Walla Walla, a common fate back then for travellers on the Oregon Trail.
Wait. I thought the treaty of Wagga Wagga was what set up Oregon as a DMZ between CA and WA to staunch the flow of Starbucks franchises in The Golden State in order to preserve our very own Peet's Coffee and Tea.
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  #40  
Old 04-04-2013, 04:24 PM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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So I wonder if the OP got an A with all this excellent help.

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  #41  
Old 04-04-2013, 05:33 PM
bot3 bot3 is offline
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I wonder if the OP even survived after all this help.
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  #42  
Old 04-04-2013, 06:39 PM
elucidator elucidator is offline
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Taking this kind of class, probably pre-law. Call it a good deed done. Nip it in the bud, Andy.
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  #43  
Old 04-04-2013, 08:15 PM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JARojas4244 View Post
I'm in desperate need for some clarification on this essay question. I do not really follow politics nor have I had government in over two years either.

Contrast the role of the president and the US Senate in terms of their ability to affect the national security agendas of the United States? Which institution has more power? Why?

Thanks in advance for any answers/replies.
Okay, serious answers.

The President and the Senate both have powers that affect national security issues. The Constitution splits up government powers so the different branches need to reach an agreement in order to do something and so each branch has leverage to influence the actions of the others. For example, the Senate has the power to declare war but the President has the power to give orders to the military. The President has the power to negotiate treaties but he has to get those treaties ratified by the Senate. The Senate has the power to enact laws but the President has the power to enforce those laws.

As for the balance of power between them, there's no definitive answer. It depends on who's in office. A strong President is more powerful than a weak Senate and a strong Senate is more powerful than a weak President. The President has the advantage that he's a single individual (along with an administration that works for him) while the power of the Senate is split up among its hundred individual members (and the Senate usually has to work with the House of Representatives). But the Senate has the power to impeach the President and remove him from office while the President cannot dismiss the Senate or remove Senators from office.
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  #44  
Old 04-04-2013, 10:02 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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All I know is the President dare not enter the Senate for fear of getting stabbed by Brutus.
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  #45  
Old 04-04-2013, 10:04 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Originally Posted by Heart of Dorkness View Post
No, though the two are often confused. The Treaty of Wasilla (aka the Palin-Putin Accord) pertains to international relations, and implies (rather controversially, I might add) that mere proximity necessarily imparts hetero-political erudition.
Except during the Clinton administration, in which it was a case of hetero-political erections.
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  #46  
Old 04-05-2013, 04:16 AM
KarlGauss KarlGauss is offline
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Well, during the Clinton administration, the president was hard at work.
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  #47  
Old 04-05-2013, 06:50 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Oh crap, why am I posting in my underwear?
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Nitpick: Corduroy is a fabric.
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  #48  
Old 04-05-2013, 07:17 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is offline
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Oh crap, why am I posting in my underwear?
How I got the internet in my underwear, I'll never know.
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  #49  
Old 04-05-2013, 09:22 AM
Nars Glinley Nars Glinley is offline
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The Senate, being the upper chamber, is responsible for countries with North in their name because these countries are farther up.
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  #50  
Old 04-05-2013, 09:31 AM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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The Senate, being the upper chamber, is responsible for countries with North in their name because these countries are farther up.
This is also related to why the Senate was the body that questioned Oliver North.
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