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  #1  
Old 04-21-2013, 09:08 PM
Hottius Maximus Hottius Maximus is offline
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Ku Ku Kachoo: What does it mean?

I hear this lyric in "I Am The Walrus" and "Mrs. Robinson" but I have no idea what it means nor the significance of it in either song. What do the members of the SDMB have to say?
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  #2  
Old 04-21-2013, 09:19 PM
Askance Askance is offline
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My Coo Cachoo Alvin Stardust 1974
I don't think it has any more intrinsic meaning than 'la la laaaa' or 'hey nonny nonny no' - it's just a string of syllables that worked in that song for that songwriter. There's probably a name for it ...
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  #3  
Old 04-22-2013, 12:56 AM
woodstockbirdybird woodstockbirdybird is offline
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The lyric in "I Am The Walrus" is "goo goo ga joob". It's from Finnegans Wake.
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  #4  
Old 04-22-2013, 01:07 AM
Muffin Muffin is offline
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Or not: http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wo...o-goo-ga-joob/
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  #5  
Old 04-22-2013, 01:22 AM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is online now
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I've long thought that Lennon was experimenting with the sounds and rhythms of the words rather than their meanings when he wrote Walrus.

And yeah, he might have been doing some other kind of experimenting also.
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  #6  
Old 04-22-2013, 01:40 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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Originally Posted by Muffin View Post
That is an excellent article!
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  #7  
Old 04-22-2013, 01:58 AM
scabpicker scabpicker is offline
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For a large part of his career, John Lennon didn't seem to feel obligated to write a song with a particular meaning. This was in that period.

ETA, and I think the same is true of Simon and Garfunkel at that time.

Last edited by scabpicker; 04-22-2013 at 01:59 AM..
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  #8  
Old 04-22-2013, 02:04 AM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is online now
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Oh, in Mrs. Robinson, it was a reference to Walrus. And a left-handed drug reference.
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  #9  
Old 04-22-2013, 04:37 AM
njtt njtt is offline
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Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
Oh, in Mrs. Robinson, it was a reference to Walrus. And a left-handed drug reference.
That is a fact, is it?

Singers (and songwriters) have been using nonsense syllables in songs since time immemorial. Hey nonny nonny no, folderol da diddle.
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  #10  
Old 04-22-2013, 05:04 AM
Jragon Jragon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranger Jeff View Post
I've long thought that Lennon was experimenting with the sounds and rhythms of the words rather than their meanings when he wrote Walrus.

And yeah, he might have been doing some other kind of experimenting also.
According to Wikipedia:

Quote:
Lennon received a letter from a pupil at Quarry Bank High School, which he had attended. The writer mentioned that the English master was making his class analyse Beatles' lyrics (Lennon wrote an answer, dated 1 September 1967, which was auctioned by Christie's of London in 1992). Lennon, amused that a teacher was putting so much effort into understanding the Beatles' lyrics, wrote the most confusing lyrics he could.

[...]

Lennon borrowed a couple of words, added the three unfinished ideas and the result was "I Am the Walrus". The Beatles' official biographer Hunter Davies was present while the song was being written and wrote an account in his 1968 biography of the Beatles. Lennon remarked to Shotton, "Let the fuckers work that one out."
So I'd say he paid plenty of attention to the words -- enough attention to make sure they were nonsensical but vaguely symbolic sounding at least.

Last edited by Jragon; 04-22-2013 at 05:04 AM..
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  #11  
Old 04-22-2013, 11:05 AM
cjepson cjepson is offline
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It means "Did you ever wake up with them bullfrogs on your mind?".
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  #12  
Old 04-22-2013, 11:44 AM
TreacherousCretin TreacherousCretin is offline
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The Rutles changed the lyric to "Do a poo POO."
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  #13  
Old 04-23-2013, 08:40 PM
Sam A. Robrin Sam A. Robrin is offline
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Lennon later regretted making the walrus the focus of the song, as he was going for a somewhat sinister vibe, and the carpenter was the real badguy of the duo. Though after his infamous remarks about Jesus a year or so previously, if he'd written a song called "I Am the Carpenter," you can just imagine the controversy!
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  #14  
Old 04-23-2013, 08:54 PM
woodstockbirdybird woodstockbirdybird is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
That is an excellent article!
Indeed! Nice to know I'm not the only one who fell for the Finnegans Wake story. Then again, there's no way I was going to read it for conformation.
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  #15  
Old 04-23-2013, 09:58 PM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is online now
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Originally Posted by cjepson View Post
It means "Did you ever wake up with them bullfrogs on your mind?".
I know what that's a sure sign of.
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  #16  
Old 04-23-2013, 10:03 PM
Flywheel Flywheel is online now
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For all the latest medical poop
Call Surgeon General C. Everett Koop.
Poo poo pa-doop.
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  #17  
Old 04-25-2013, 06:04 PM
akrako1 akrako1 is offline
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"Smoke pot, smoke pot! Everybody smoke pot!"

as much as some folks say that's NOT what they're singing at the end, it's ALL i can hear!
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  #18  
Old 04-25-2013, 07:01 PM
Sam A. Robrin Sam A. Robrin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akrako1 View Post
"Smoke pot, smoke pot! Everybody smoke pot!"

as much as some folks say that's NOT what they're singing at the end, it's ALL i can hear!
Lennon said it was "Got one ... Got one ... Everybody's got one."
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  #19  
Old 04-25-2013, 08:09 PM
Backwater Under_Duck Backwater Under_Duck is offline
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Gesundheit, Catherwood.
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  #20  
Old 04-25-2013, 08:25 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam A. Robrin View Post
Lennon said it was "Got one ... Got one ... Everybody's got one."
That's what the women of the chorus are singing. The men are singing "Oom-pah, oom-pah, stick it up your jumper" (pronounced "joompah").
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  #21  
Old 04-25-2013, 08:42 PM
Bryan Ekers Bryan Ekers is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njtt View Post
That is a fact, is it?

Singers (and songwriters) have been using nonsense syllables in songs since time immemorial. Hey nonny nonny no, folderol da diddle.
"Give peace a chance...."
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  #22  
Old 04-25-2013, 09:02 PM
Lukeinva Lukeinva is offline
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Provocative question Hottius Maximus btw I love your name, btw2 way I hope you're a girl

Last edited by Lukeinva; 04-25-2013 at 09:02 PM..
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  #23  
Old 04-25-2013, 09:30 PM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is online now
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Ku Ku Kachoo means the walrus has an allergy, you know?
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  #24  
Old 04-25-2013, 11:09 PM
Hazle Weatherfield Hazle Weatherfield is offline
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Su sussudio!
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  #25  
Old 04-25-2013, 11:36 PM
Flywheel Flywheel is online now
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Gabba gabba hey!
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  #26  
Old 04-26-2013, 06:56 AM
OtisCampbellWasRight OtisCampbellWasRight is offline
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As several have stated, it seems to be a form of psychedelic skat.

Bands like Steely Dan and even Yes would use words (lyrics) for their sonic merit, and the lines didn't have to make sense. Just one more example of the Beatles trying innovative ideas.

Last edited by OtisCampbellWasRight; 04-26-2013 at 06:57 AM.. Reason: tpyo
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  #27  
Old 04-26-2013, 10:02 PM
Sternvogel Sternvogel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam A. Robrin View Post
Lennon later regretted making the walrus the focus of the song, as he was going for a somewhat sinister vibe, and the carpenter was the real badguy of the duo. Though after his infamous remarks about Jesus a year or so previously, if he'd written a song called "I Am the Carpenter," you can just imagine the controversy!
You must be misremembering. According to this Playboy interview excerpt:

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Lennon
It's from "The Walrus and the Carpenter." "Alice in Wonderland." To me, it was a beautiful poem. It never dawned on me that Lewis Carroll was commenting on the capitalist and social system. I never went into that bit about what he really meant, like people are doing with the Beatles' work. Later, I went back and looked at it and realized that the walrus was the bad guy in the story and the carpenter was the good guy. I thought, Oh, shit, I picked the wrong guy. I should have said, "I am the carpenter." But that wouldn't have been the same, would it? [Singing] "I am the carpenter....""
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  #28  
Old 04-29-2013, 07:25 PM
Hottius Maximus Hottius Maximus is offline
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Originally Posted by Lukeinva View Post
Provocative question Hottius Maximus btw I love your name, btw2 way I hope you're a girl
I am a man.
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  #29  
Old 04-29-2013, 08:44 PM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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It's Lithuanian for Boop Boop Be Doop
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  #30  
Old 04-30-2013, 04:01 PM
Greg Charles Greg Charles is online now
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Originally Posted by Lukeinva View Post
Provocative question Hottius Maximus btw I love your name, btw2 way I hope you're a girl
Wouldn't that be Hottia Maxima?

(That's actually a genuine question. I have no idea.)
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  #31  
Old 05-01-2013, 06:09 PM
Hottius Maximus Hottius Maximus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Charles View Post
Wouldn't that be Hottia Maxima?

(That's actually a genuine question. I have no idea.)
LOL! Perhaps my female counterpart would be either what you said or Hottia Maximette!
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  #32  
Old 05-01-2013, 06:22 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
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Ku Ku Kachoo: What does it mean?

It means they stutter when they sneeze.
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  #33  
Old 05-02-2013, 03:45 PM
TBG TBG is offline
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Ku ku kachoo rhymes with 23 skidoo, which I also have no idea what it means.
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  #34  
Old 05-02-2013, 05:03 PM
$3Bill $3Bill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njtt View Post
That is a fact, is it?

Singers (and songwriters) have been using nonsense syllables in songs since time immemorial. Hey nonny nonny no, folderol da diddle.
It is a fact that koo koo kachoo is an allusion to Walrus. As far as drugs go, "It's a little secret, just the Robinson's affair, Most of all you've got to hide it from the kids." A lot of free-floating paranoia bait in that song. You had to be there.
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  #35  
Old 05-02-2013, 11:56 PM
Sam A. Robrin Sam A. Robrin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by $3Bill View Post
It is a fact that koo koo kachoo is an allusion to Walrus. As far as drugs go, "It's a little secret, just the Robinson's affair, Most of all you've got to hide it from the kids." A lot of free-floating paranoia bait in that song. You had to be there.
I don't know if it helps, but "Mrs. Robinson" was originally "Mrs. Roosevelt." When Paul Simon got the commission for The Graduate, he used the song as is, changing only the name.
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