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  #1  
Old 07-28-2013, 01:00 PM
DMark DMark is offline
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Question About British TV Series: Scott & Bailey

My SO and I really like this show, Scott & Bailey - currently airing after Doc Martin on our local PBS station.

It has some pretty gritty plots - and some nice back stories that keep you tuning in week after week.

My question:

In the most recent episode, DC Baily was suspected of a crime and, because of this, they sent her for fingerprinting and DNA samples.

Aren't ALL members of any police force automatically fingerprinted at least, BEFORE they are hired to work on a police force?
Don't the Brits do fingerprinting and DNA tests to ensure the people working on the police force don't have a police record themselves?

Granted, a somewhat minor nitpick on an otherwise great show - but it just struck me as odd to see her being fingerprinted and submitting to a DNA test after she has already been on the force for several years.
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  #2  
Old 07-28-2013, 02:06 PM
Asympotically fat Asympotically fat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark View Post
My SO and I really like this show, Scott & Bailey - currently airing after Doc Martin on our local PBS station.

It has some pretty gritty plots - and some nice back stories that keep you tuning in week after week.

My question:

In the most recent episode, DC Baily was suspected of a crime and, because of this, they sent her for fingerprinting and DNA samples.

Aren't ALL members of any police force automatically fingerprinted at least, BEFORE they are hired to work on a police force?
Don't the Brits do fingerprinting and DNA tests to ensure the people working on the police force don't have a police record themselves?

Granted, a somewhat minor nitpick on an otherwise great show - but it just struck me as odd to see her being fingerprinted and submitting to a DNA test after she has already been on the force for several years.
In terms of verifying whether someone has a criminal record in the UK, no there is no need to take fingerprints or DNA as there is essentially a single database (the PNC) in the UK that records people's police records making the process much simpler than in the US.
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Old 07-28-2013, 02:45 PM
DMark DMark is offline
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Originally Posted by Asympotically fat View Post
In terms of verifying whether someone has a criminal record in the UK, no there is no need to take fingerprints or DNA as there is essentially a single database (the PNC) in the UK that records people's police records making the process much simpler than in the US.
Hmm...but wouldn't it be wise to have those fingerprints and DNA on file, just in case a crime scene was contaminated, or perhaps an officer really was involved in some crime?

Just sayin' - seems like a little "after the fact" to be just taking fingerprints and DNA long after a person is working for the police force.
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Old 07-28-2013, 02:57 PM
Asympotically fat Asympotically fat is offline
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Originally Posted by DMark View Post
Hmm...but wouldn't it be wise to have those fingerprints and DNA on file, just in case a crime scene was contaminated, or perhaps an officer really was involved in some crime?

Just sayin' - seems like a little "after the fact" to be just taking fingerprints and DNA long after a person is working for the police force.
I'm fairly certain they don't keep officers' DNA and fingerprints, for example I don't believe they're allowed to keep such data any more unless someone is convicted of an offence. I'm guessing most likely if they feared contamination or that an officer was involved they would conduct tests ad hoc and dispose of the data unless a conviction resulted.
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  #5  
Old 07-28-2013, 04:11 PM
BrokenBriton BrokenBriton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark View Post
Hmm...but wouldn't it be wise to have those fingerprints and DNA on file, just in case a crime scene was contaminated, or perhaps an officer really was involved in some crime?

Just sayin' - seems like a little "after the fact" to be just taking fingerprints and DNA long after a person is working for the police force.
Holy hell: You can't just require people to give you their fingerprints and DNA !
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  #6  
Old 07-28-2013, 05:11 PM
Myglaren Myglaren is offline
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I have been fingerprinted on a couple of occasions where crimes have been committed in properties I was responsible for and my prints were required for elimination purposes.

I was told that the prints would be destroyed after a month, once all the forensics were complete.
Prints are as far as I am aware only permanently retained where someone is convicted of a crime.

IIRC all prison populations are fingerprinted as a matter of course.
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Old 07-28-2013, 05:38 PM
DMark DMark is offline
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OK then - different laws.

I do know that just to be a teacher in Nevada, you have to be fingerprinted and have those prints run through the national database...and your fingerprints are kept on file forever.
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Old 07-28-2013, 07:26 PM
glee glee is offline
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Originally Posted by DMark View Post
OK then - different laws.

I do know that just to be a teacher in Nevada, you have to be fingerprinted and have those prints run through the national database...and your fingerprints are kept on file forever.
I teach in an English private school.
They checked me on the CRB (Criminal Records Database) national database to make sure I didn't have any unsuitable convictions and also checked my references - but nothing else (i.e. no fingerprints / DNA etc.)
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  #9  
Old 07-28-2013, 08:05 PM
AuntiePam AuntiePam is offline
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I'm just glad Scott & Bailey is getting a little bit of attention. I do think it's best to watch from the beginning. The subplot with Nick the nefarious barrister will be confusing otherwise.

I love these women.
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  #10  
Old 07-29-2013, 02:02 AM
BrokenBriton BrokenBriton is offline
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It confuses me somewhat. At times the gender reversal is subtle and wry, at other times they slap you around the face with it. Probably best contrasted with late 70s/early 80s macho procedurals.

I suppose the same goes for the mumsy-type and brassy northerner-type; sometimes you think 'okay, I get it' and other times it works well.

I find the interview room theme very well done - drama!
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