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  #51  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:01 PM
missred missred is online now
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Originally Posted by jsgoddess View Post
I'm from SE Ohio and lots of people look at me weird when I say I miss chicken/beef and noodles over mashed potatoes. Like so. What can I say? I'm German!
Yeah, I get funny looks too when I mention that (north central Indiana Amish country). I also didn't realize that the breaded tenderloin was regional until I moved off.

The one I popped in to mention is sugar cream pie. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_cream_pie It was never one of my favorites, but sold out on a daily basis in the restraunts where I worked growing up. Outside of that area, you don't hear much about it.
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  #52  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:18 PM
Yookeroo Yookeroo is offline
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a street cooked hotdog....usually wrapped in bacon with a ton of onions on it is often called an LA dog. I assume it rose to prominence in Los Angeles.
Yeah. After big events in L.A., bacon wrapped hot dogs are a tradition. Add some green peppers wit the onions.
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  #53  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:59 PM
Reno Nevada Reno Nevada is offline
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Another one that seems local to the Houston area is the kolache, a kind of roll, slightly sweet, wrapped around a sausage or filled with something sweet--like jelly donut filling. All the donut shops around town, and there are a lot of them, also sell kolaches.

Apparently they are an Eastern European thing. My sister-in-law, who's family had always cooked them, was surprised to learn they were common around here.
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  #54  
Old 08-08-2013, 10:05 PM
BuzzSaw101 BuzzSaw101 is offline
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In West Virginia, we have Pepperoni Rolls. All it is is pepperoni baked into a soft roll. Yummy, yummy.

Last edited by BuzzSaw101; 08-08-2013 at 10:06 PM..
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  #55  
Old 08-08-2013, 10:40 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Originally Posted by Tara57 View Post
Southeastern US -- black-eyed peas for luck on New Year's Day
My father used to make us eat that on New Year's Day. We were in West Texas, but he was from California and his people from New York, so that might be more widespread. I never did like black-eyed peas though. Had to choke them down. Not a good start to the year.


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Originally Posted by bump View Post
I think it's more of a derivation when we're talking about restaurants, but essentially the difference is that chicken-fried steak is battered and fried in the same manner as chicken- it's crispy and has a batter coating, and is invariably served with cream gravy. In Texas anyway, it derived from the various sorts of schnitzel that the German immigrants ate in the old country, and adapted to local ingredients.
Chicken-fried steak is something I have to give Texas credit for. It's just plain good eatin'. The wife loved it when I took her there and she tried it.
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  #56  
Old 08-09-2013, 01:58 PM
Tethered Kite Tethered Kite is offline
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Originally Posted by Reno Nevada View Post
Another one that seems local to the Houston area is the kolache, a kind of roll, slightly sweet, wrapped around a sausage or filled with something sweet--like jelly donut filling. All the donut shops around town, and there are a lot of them, also sell kolaches.

Apparently they are an Eastern European thing. My sister-in-law, who's family had always cooked them, was surprised to learn they were common around here.
South central MN has a pocket of eastern European immigrant communities and Montgomery, MN celebrates Kolachke Days annually. Here they are stuffed with dried apricots or poppy seeds. An acquired taste, I think. I find them rather dry.

My husband remembers that celebration well as it is the time he ended up wearing a Polish sausage necklace. He was still in college and driving a soda pop truck on weekends. Delivering to the town during the parade. Some drunk guy riding on a float was waving the string of sausages above his head and accidently let go.

Come to MN where drunk Czechs fling food! Whee.
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  #57  
Old 08-09-2013, 02:46 PM
MentalGuy MentalGuy is offline
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Owensboro, Kentucky is known for its mutton barbecue.
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  #58  
Old 08-09-2013, 02:50 PM
bump bump is offline
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Originally Posted by Reno Nevada View Post
Another one that seems local to the Houston area is the kolache,
Hardly local to Houston; they're a Czech pastry, and are common all over Texas where there are Czech communities, including places like Caldwell, Snook, College Station, West and Ennis, and really most of Central Texas.
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  #59  
Old 08-09-2013, 03:01 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by MentalGuy View Post
Owensboro, Kentucky is known for its mutton barbecue.
Also, the stew known as burgoo is another regional dish popular in that area, although it exists in other places in the US. I don't think I've seen mutton barbecue outside of Western Kentucky and the very southern tip of Indiana (Evansville).
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  #60  
Old 08-09-2013, 03:51 PM
california jobcase california jobcase is offline
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Eat the tenderloin sandwich for the entree, but you have to eat sugar cream pie for dessert in Hoosierland.
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  #61  
Old 08-09-2013, 04:15 PM
Spoke Spoke is offline
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Also, the stew known as burgoo is another regional dish popular in that area, although it exists in other places in the US.
That sounds a lot like Brunswick stew. I suspect both derived from Native American stews.
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  #62  
Old 08-09-2013, 04:26 PM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is online now
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I have friends from St. Louis who introduced me to Gooey Butter Cake. Check your family history of diabetes before attempting this.

Last edited by Southern Yankee; 08-09-2013 at 04:26 PM.. Reason: Spelling
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  #63  
Old 08-09-2013, 04:32 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Spoke View Post
That sounds a lot like Brunswick stew.
Yep, they are very similar and, in fact, I'm not entirely sure if there's any universally agreed-upon difference between them.
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  #64  
Old 08-09-2013, 04:46 PM
Accidental Martyr Accidental Martyr is offline
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
Hardly local to Houston; they're a Czech pastry, and are common all over Texas where there are Czech communities, including places like Caldwell, Snook, College Station, West and Ennis, and really most of Central Texas.
I had never heard of them until I dated a girl from Belton, Texas and visited her parents.
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  #65  
Old 08-09-2013, 05:12 PM
Mean Mr. Mustard Mean Mr. Mustard is offline
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Not much Michigan representation, so I offer:

The Coney Dog

The paczki (a pre-lenten treat, pronounced POONCH-key)

City chicken (I may be wrong about its regionality)

The Boston Cooler (Vernors & Ice Cream, invented near Boston St. in Detroit)

And, I have heard that a dish sold in Chinese restaurants, almond boneless chicken, is specific to (or originated in) Detroit. This is news to me. Can anyone confirm?


mmm
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  #66  
Old 08-09-2013, 05:14 PM
sylmar sylmar is offline
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As for beverages, Moxie in New England ( Lore has it one of the secret ingredients is burnt pumpkin) and Big Red in the South ...
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  #67  
Old 08-09-2013, 05:20 PM
Motorgirl Motorgirl is online now
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Originally Posted by sylmar View Post
As for beverages, Moxie in New England ( Lore has it one of the secret ingredients is burnt pumpkin)
Nonsense. The secret ingredient is carbonated evil. Ugh. My husband, who grew up on it, loves it. Not me.
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  #68  
Old 08-09-2013, 08:17 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Not much Michigan representation, so I offer:

The Coney Dog

The paczki (a pre-lenten treat, pronounced POONCH-key)

City chicken (I may be wrong about its regionality)

The Boston Cooler (Vernors & Ice Cream, invented near Boston St. in Detroit)

And, I have heard that a dish sold in Chinese restaurants, almond boneless chicken, is specific to (or originated in) Detroit. This is news to me. Can anyone confirm?


mmm
You guys also got Detroit-style pizza, which I love, oddly enough, as I tend not to like thicker styles.
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  #69  
Old 08-09-2013, 09:55 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Another New Mexico specialty is Hatch chiles. Specifically, Hatch green chiles. The entire state goes gaga over them, and rightly so.
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  #70  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:52 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is online now
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Representing San Francisco:

cioppino
sourdough bread
Joe's Special (a dish of ground beef, spinach and eggs that was invented by Original Joe's restaurant)

There's a type of dry salami that's made by several different companies in the Bay Area (notably Molinari). I don't know whether this should count, though, since it's really just a take on a type of Italian salami.

Dungeness crab is very popular in the S.F. Bay Area. For some families it's become part of their Thanksgiving tradition. I don't know whether I would call it a San Francisco food, though - it's very popular along most of the Pacific coast.

The Mission burrito originated in San Francisco, but it's not restricted to there. You could say the same about Irish coffee.
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  #71  
Old 08-10-2013, 06:18 AM
Smapti Smapti is online now
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San Diego has carne asada fries, which are just now starting to catch on outside southern California.

Up here in the northwest the most unique local food tradition I can think of is the special sauce that most mom-n-pop restaurants or small local burger chains put on their hamburgers - it's basically a mix of mustard and tartar sauce, sort of like if you made Thousand Island with mustard instead of ketchup. I don't think there's a standard name for it - Egan's/Big Tom here in Olympia calls it 'goop', for instance.
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  #72  
Old 08-10-2013, 11:47 AM
MN_Maenad MN_Maenad is offline
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Originally Posted by Tethered Kite View Post
South central MN has a pocket of eastern European immigrant communities and Montgomery, MN celebrates Kolachke Days annually. Here they are stuffed with dried apricots or poppy seeds.
My gramma was Czech (Bohemian, specifically), and my dad still loves the poppy seed version. Also head cheese.

Hell yes to both smelt fries and bullheads - love them both. Every winter my mom's family gets together to make lefse, a potato-based flatbread that's cooked on round griddles ~18 inches across. AKA the delivery vehicle for butter and brown sugar.

Is liverwurst a thing outside of the upper midwest? Love the stuff, even though I generally don't like organ meats.

Hotdish! DH and I joke that any casserole is hotdish. And they're always cooked at 350 for 30 minutes.
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  #73  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:49 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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When I lived in Colorado I encountered Rocky Mountain Oysters, breaded and deep fried calf testicles. They actually were somewhat reminiscent of fried oysters. They're found in many of the Great Plains and Mountain States.

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Upstate New York has speedies.
I used to enjoy these when I lived in Ithaca in the early 1970s, but thought they were specific to a particular restaurant rather than being regional.
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  #74  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:26 PM
bump bump is offline
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Originally Posted by Accidental Martyr View Post
I had never heard of them until I dated a girl from Belton, Texas and visited her parents.
THE place to get them that I'm aware of is in West (the place where the fertilizer blew up) on I-35. The Czech Stop has very good kolaches and klobasniks (klobasniki?) and a bunch of other stuff including some pickled jalapenos from some Doper's family who lives nearby in McGregor (that's what the jar says anyway).
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  #75  
Old 08-10-2013, 04:36 PM
eenerms eenerms is offline
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Friday night fish frys in Wisconsin. They also have Cornish pasties and brats.
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  #76  
Old 08-10-2013, 05:17 PM
silenus silenus is online now
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Utah and neighboring areas are the only place I've encountered fry sauce, a mix of mayo and ketchup that they serve with everything.
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  #77  
Old 08-10-2013, 06:21 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Originally Posted by August West View Post
In my area of the state there is Booyah, which is a chicken (usually) stew cooked in large kettles. It's derived from recipes from immigrants from the BeNeLux region. Unsurprisingly, some of the town names in this area are Belgium, Luxemburg, Brussels, Denmark, Walhain (See also Walloon), etc.
I grew up in Green Bay, which was primarily settled by Belgian immigrants (the biggest section of the phone book when I was a kid there, in the 1970s, was "V" -- Van den Xxxx, Van der Xxxx, Van de Xxxx. )

Booyah was omnipresent in Green Bay; if you went to a church picnic (GB was, and probably still is, heavily Catholic), there would undoubtedly be booyah served. All of the local bar-and-grills offer it, too. I only had it once, and didn't like it -- it's really an acquired taste, I suppose, and it's often made with some of the less-than-desirable bits of the chicken.

Given how predominantly Catholic the city historically was, it's not surprising that Friday Night fish fries are still extremely popular (especially during Lent).

Two other items which come to mind when I think about food from Green Bay / northeastern Wisconsin:

- Cheese curds, either fresh (at which point, they may be called "squeak cheese", due to how they squeak against your teeth when you bite into them), or breaded and deep-fried

- A "brat burger" -- a hamburger in which the patty is made with meat from a bratwurst (removed from the casing and patted out into a burger shape). Commonly offered in a double-decker sandwich, with one brat patty and one beef patty

Last edited by kenobi 65; 08-10-2013 at 06:22 PM..
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  #78  
Old 08-10-2013, 10:33 PM
bmoak bmoak is offline
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From Central NY

Spiedies: Just finished the 30th Annual Spiediefest here in Binghamton.
City Chicken: I've seen this in Scranton & Pittsburgh as well. A holdover of a time when pork and veal were cheater than chicken in city markets. Supermarkets here sell city chicken kits, with the little wooden skewers.
Salt Potatoes:
Cornell Chicken: Created by a Cornell professor in Ithaca.
Chicken Riggies: Rigatoni cooked with chicken and hot peppers in a spicy tomato cream sauce. Rarely seen outside the Utica/Rome area.
Utica Greens
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  #79  
Old 08-10-2013, 10:45 PM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is offline
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When I lived in Philly as a small child, I remember whenever my parents took me downtown, there was someone selling soft pretzels. And when we moved to Ohio when I was 16, I was disappointed there were no Tastykakes that far West.
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  #80  
Old 08-10-2013, 11:30 PM
catnoe catnoe is offline
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For a while, we in NC were the only place to get the traditional Krispy Kreme doughnut.

Moravian sugar cake

Grits

Lexington style Barbecue

Banana pudding


We also do the tenderloin biscuit.
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  #81  
Old 08-11-2013, 12:00 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
Western NY has Beef on Weck and Salt Potatoes. Not sure if you would agree, but Buffalo Wings were also invented in Buffalo NY.
Well, you covered beef on weck and wings. One more regional dish to Buffalo is Chiavetta's chicken, which is basically a grilled chicken that has been marinated in Chiavetta's marinade, basically a vinegar, garlic, & Italian herbs/spiced marinade. It's almost like an oil-less Italian dressing.
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  #82  
Old 08-11-2013, 07:54 AM
bmoak bmoak is offline
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Chiavetta's chicken is the same as Cornell chicken, which is all over central NY.

Last edited by bmoak; 08-11-2013 at 07:55 AM..
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  #83  
Old 08-11-2013, 09:29 AM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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The area around Sheboygan, WI gives us delights like:

1) The Oostburger: A bratwurst (or two) and and a hamburger patty served on a Sheboygan hard roll (aka Semmel roll.)

2) The hot tamale, which is basically a sloppy joe (also usually served on a sheboygan hard roll)

3) And of course, the last which should be first, the Sheboygan Brat itself, elaborated on here in a New York Times article.
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  #84  
Old 08-11-2013, 09:33 AM
NGC2024 NGC2024 is offline
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In Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, we have red beet eggs, hog maw (pig's stomach) and chicken pot pie (the right way, with noodles, not a crust).
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  #85  
Old 08-11-2013, 02:47 PM
Brynda Brynda is offline
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Along with the stuffed ham FairyChatMom mentioned, St. Mary's County, Maryland also has steamed blue crab. They dump them on the table in a pile, give you a cracker, and you go at it.
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  #86  
Old 08-11-2013, 05:53 PM
snuffleupagus snuffleupagus is offline
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In addition to the hot brown, burgoo, and mutton BBQ already mentioned, Kentucky also has benedictine spread- a cucumber-cream cheese spread, beer cheese, and derby pie- a chocolate-bourbon-pecan or walnut pie. Those are the foods I come here to post, but now more come to mind- Ale-8-One, (a local ginger ale, often a mixer with bourbon), pulled cream candy, bourbon balls, and mint juleps (funny how many of these involve bourbon!).
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  #87  
Old 08-11-2013, 05:59 PM
Colibri Colibri is online now
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Most foods associated with New York City are just varieties of various ethnic foods, but the egg cream soda (which contain neither egg nor cream) is a NYC invention.
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  #88  
Old 08-11-2013, 07:04 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
Chiavetta's chicken is the same as Cornell chicken, which is all over central NY.
It's similar, but not the same. I've had both and, in fact, have Chiavetta's in the cupboard and made Cornell chicken using the standard recipe two weeks ago. The marinades look different to begin with, with Chiavetta's being a brownish color and Cornell being a milky white color to yellowish white color. Chiavetta's also has a good bit of garlic, while Cornell does not. Cornell chicken has oil in the marinade, as well as egg. You're basically kinda sorta making a really vinegary, watery mayonnaise. If you drop the oil from the Cornell chicken and add some garlic, you have something close to Chiavetta's. Chiavetta's is also thickened with xanthan gum. (Ingredients: Vinegar, Salt, Spices, Fresh Garlic, Xanthan gum.)

You can find the Cornell chicken recipe and a Chiavetta's knock-off here and compare.

Last edited by pulykamell; 08-11-2013 at 07:09 PM..
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  #89  
Old 08-11-2013, 09:14 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
1) The Oostburger: A bratwurst (or two) and and a hamburger patty served on a Sheboygan hard roll (aka Semmel roll.)
Ahh, Semmel rolls...popular in Green Bay, too.

(My mother is from Port Washington; I have relatives on her side who used to live in Oostburg, as well as nearby Waldo. )
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  #90  
Old 08-12-2013, 02:08 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is offline
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Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
(My mother is from Port Washington; I have relatives on her side who used to live in Oostburg, as well as nearby Waldo. )
Mention Adell, Hingham, and Gibbsville too and I'll soon become absolutely overwhelmed by nostalgia....
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  #91  
Old 08-12-2013, 02:16 PM
August West August West is offline
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Not much Michigan representation, so I offe

The paczki (a pre-lenten treat, pronounced POONCH-key)
Paczki are quite popular in Milwaukee, as well. Growing up in the Fox Valley I had never heard of them, but Fat Tuesday is called Paczki Day in Milwaukee.
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  #92  
Old 08-12-2013, 03:26 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Pączki are popular here in Chicago, and Fat Tuesday is also Pączki Day. Pretty much what you'd expect, given the large population of Poles here. I believe they are also represented in Buffalo, NY.
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  #93  
Old 08-12-2013, 03:34 PM
Labrador Deceiver Labrador Deceiver is offline
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Another New Mexico specialty is Hatch chiles. Specifically, Hatch green chiles. The entire state goes gaga over them, and rightly so.
Don't forget Chimayo chiles.
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  #94  
Old 08-12-2013, 03:41 PM
Labrador Deceiver Labrador Deceiver is offline
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Originally Posted by catnoe View Post
For a while, we in NC were the only place to get the traditional Krispy Kreme doughnut.

Moravian sugar cake

Grits

Lexington style Barbecue

Banana pudding


We also do the tenderloin biscuit.
God, it almost isn;t christmas without the Moravian Sugar Cake. You forgot about the cookies, though, which are getting to be quite popular outside of NC.
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  #95  
Old 08-12-2013, 06:39 PM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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I am getting the munchies ...
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  #96  
Old 08-13-2013, 07:28 AM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is online now
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Pączki are popular here in Chicago, and Fat Tuesday is also Pączki Day. Pretty much what you'd expect, given the large population of Poles here. I believe they are also represented in Buffalo, NY.
Yep, we have those in Detroit, too. Hamtramck (a city surrounded by Detroit) was historically very Polish; it was the setting for Polish Wedding.
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  #97  
Old 08-13-2013, 08:06 AM
lost4life lost4life is offline
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Not much Michigan representation, so I offer:

The Coney Dog

The paczki (a pre-lenten treat, pronounced POONCH-key)

City chicken (I may be wrong about its regionality)

The Boston Cooler (Vernors & Ice Cream, invented near Boston St. in Detroit)

And, I have heard that a dish sold in Chinese restaurants, almond boneless chicken, is specific to (or originated in) Detroit. This is news to me. Can anyone confirm?


mmm
Paczkis are found most places that have Polish populations. Although I lived in Michigan and had plenty in Hamtramck, I've also had them in Chicago, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and in any of my aunt's kitchens. Same with city chicken. I definitely had that before moving to Michigan.

However, there is nothing like a Detroit coney dog. It sounds simple, but kinda like a Philly cheesesteak, most places just can't get it right!
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  #98  
Old 08-13-2013, 10:17 AM
fiddlesticks fiddlesticks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan View Post
The area around Sheboygan, WI gives us delights like:

1) The Oostburger: A bratwurst (or two) and and a hamburger patty served on a Sheboygan hard roll (aka Semmel roll.)

2) The hot tamale, which is basically a sloppy joe (also usually served on a sheboygan hard roll)

3) And of course, the last which should be first, the Sheboygan Brat itself, elaborated on here in a New York Times article.
We had a whole thread about "sloppy joes"/"hot tamales" a few years back. Oops, didn't check that your link was the same as mine.

Last edited by fiddlesticks; 08-13-2013 at 10:21 AM..
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  #99  
Old 08-13-2013, 10:29 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by fiddlesticks View Post
We had a whole thread about "sloppy joes"/"hot tamales" a few years back. Oops, didn't check that your link was the same as mine.
Ah, which reminds me, "loose meat" or "tavern sandwiches," which are basically sloppy joes without the sloppy sauce, are popular in Iowa (see: Maid-Rite) as well as Minnesota (or at least parts of Minnesota). And, along with Indiana, as mentioned before, Iowa is pretty well known for its pork tenderloin sandwiches, as well.
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  #100  
Old 08-13-2013, 10:55 AM
Red Stilettos Red Stilettos is offline
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Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
We (Maryland) also have Smith Island Cake.
Those can also be found in South Georgia. My grandmother's generation was very competitive about how many layers they could get in their cakes. They didn't have a special name just "chocolate cake". My grandmother also made a wonderful version with caramel icing made by boiling a can of PET milk. I may have to make one of those this weekend....
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