Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-23-2013, 12:49 PM
NineToTheSky NineToTheSky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 2,773
Why isn't Amazon in Australia?

Amazon is pretty global now, but one potentially huge market that it has so far ignored is Australia. I wonder why.
  #2  
Old 10-23-2013, 01:06 PM
araminty araminty is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Santa Clara, CA
Posts: 2,452
Lots of reasons, but mostly, it's NOT a huge market. The population of Australia is 22 million, not much more than New York City, spread out over an area almost the same size as the continental US. In short, it's just not worth it.
  #3  
Old 10-23-2013, 01:12 PM
NineToTheSky NineToTheSky is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 2,773
I have got an Australian friend who is pretty upset by the lack of Amazon, because, as far as I know, there isn't really an alternative.

Last edited by NineToTheSky; 10-23-2013 at 01:13 PM.
  #4  
Old 10-23-2013, 01:16 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 71,777
You would think Amazon might choose to serve only, say, the three biggest Australian cities, or within six hours' drive of whatever distribution hub(s) they choose to set up. Just writing off the entire country seems odd.
  #5  
Old 10-23-2013, 01:25 PM
friedo friedo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 23,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by araminty View Post
Lots of reasons, but mostly, it's NOT a huge market. The population of Australia is 22 million, not much more than New York City, spread out over an area almost the same size as the continental US. In short, it's just not worth it.
The population of New York City is 8.3 million. But there's about 20 million in the NYC metro region.
  #6  
Old 10-23-2013, 01:28 PM
Great Antibob Great Antibob is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 4,793
Quick Google search turned this up.

No idea if it'll actually happen, but it seems like Amazon already sells plenty to Australians. It just doesn't have a local distribution warehouse yet. And even if it's working on it, it'll take some time. It took a few years before the Texas distribution center opened and legal challenges and such just extended the timeframe.
  #7  
Old 10-23-2013, 01:32 PM
leandroc76 leandroc76 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Yes
Posts: 181
Amazon is not a logistical carrier. The only part of the logistic chain Amazon deals with is warehousing and customer interfacing. As we all know sales is interfaced using the Amazon.com domain.

Logistics carriers, primarily UPS and Fedex probably don't have enough saturation in the Australian market to do daily business. This is probably most likely due the fact that Australia is only, what, 6000 miles from CONUS? The logistical routes most likely cannot cover the demand that Amazon traffic would create.

Furthermore, there are 5 international airports. The logistical costs of shipping a small package of widgets to anywhere in Australia would be exhorbitant.
  #8  
Old 10-23-2013, 02:20 PM
Ximenean Ximenean is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 7,083
I'm not sure that distance from the US, per se, is an issue. The issue is that it's a relatively small market, far away from everywhere. That means they would need warehouses in Australia itself, like they have in the US, Europe, and elsewhere, and I guess the size of the market doesn't justify that fixed cost. Maybe their business model requires x million people per major distrubution centre, and x is greater than 23.
  #9  
Old 10-23-2013, 07:07 PM
GreedySmurf GreedySmurf is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: London, England
Posts: 1,514
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
You would think Amazon might choose to serve only, say, the three biggest Australian cities, or within six hours' drive of whatever distribution hub(s) they choose to set up. Just writing off the entire country seems odd.
Trouble is our three largest cities are >6 hours drive apart. The state capitals (and largest cities) of our Eastern seaboard, Brisbane, Sydney, and Melbourne are ~900kms apart. There's not any sizable population centers located anything like equidistant between the cities either.


It's interesting though, I recently saw some stats that Australian's spent $7.6Billion AUD on overseas online shopping in the last 12 months. So there's certainly demand there. The question is would having a local distribution center increase Amazon's share of that pie? If not, the existing structure does the trick for the Australian market.
  #10  
Old 10-23-2013, 07:36 PM
Keeve Keeve is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: NY/NJ, USA
Posts: 5,071
I don't understand this whole thread. Amazon is a merchant, not a shipper. Is the problem that amazon.com doesn't even work from Australia, or that none of their shippers will ship to Australia, or that they don't accept Australian dollars?
  #11  
Old 10-23-2013, 07:45 PM
Charley Charley is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Singapore
Posts: 751
Well, not all Amazon shippers will ship to Australia. Not all goods can be imported that way either. In addition, buying something in a foreign currency and shipping it internationally seems self-evidently not the cheapest, quickest or most efficient way to get it, if there were any alternative.
__________________
I choose solid ground to make my stands and stay off the streets at closing time.
  #12  
Old 10-23-2013, 08:09 PM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 4,586
Australians do buy from Amazon a fair bit. I mostly only buy the traditional for Amazon stuff, books, CDs, DVDs. Amazon UK actually has better prices and shipping costs than the US for a lot of stuff. As for all the allied stuff, it all gets a lot harder.

Australia has different power than the US, so pretty much all electronics goods are out, unless they have a universal power supply, or are prepared to cope with power converters. European goods are OK, and there was a spate of people buying home theatre amplifiers from Amazon Germany, who had really good prices and good shipping costs.

The big problem for many companies shipping to Oz is that any shipping method with a tracking number comes at a serious premium, and so far as I know, all involve air freight. There is no cheap and slow way to ship to Oz with tracking. And most companies won't ship without tracking. When you look at shipping from the US, you get quoted for next day deliver, or 3 day delivery, sometimes at a cost that exceeds the purchase price of what you want shipped. If you are happy to wait a month for it, and pay for sea freight, there is no way to buy it.

Inside Oz, a big problem is indeed still shipping. We have no local equivalent of UPS, and couriers like FedEx are extortionate. It can cost as much to ship a parcel from a receiving depot in Oz to you as shipping from the US to the shipping depot. On the other hand, our local postal service (Australia Post) is trying to reinvent itself as an internet purchase shipping company, so things may improve.

Amazon are here, but not as a retailer. Amazon Web Services have a facility in Sydney.
  #13  
Old 10-23-2013, 08:44 PM
tellyworth tellyworth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,142
It's possible that parallel import laws have something to do with it too. Amazon already charges higher retail prices for e-books delivered to Australian buyers, because (as I understand it) those laws essentially give "local" publishers considerable power to control prices.

If they were delivering books from Australian warehouses I suspect they'd be stuck buying from local distributors and hence paying higher wholesale prices.
  #14  
Old 10-23-2013, 10:15 PM
John Mace John Mace is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: South Bay
Posts: 81,072
The Amazon is in South America, not Australia. Duh!!!
  #15  
Old 10-23-2013, 10:38 PM
Superhal Superhal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: The Internet. Since '84.
Posts: 6,460
Quote:
Originally Posted by NineToTheSky View Post
I have got an Australian friend who is pretty upset by the lack of Amazon, because, as far as I know, there isn't really an alternative.
Wow, there's no books in Australia?
  #16  
Old 10-23-2013, 10:44 PM
tellyworth tellyworth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superhal View Post
Wow, there's no books in Australia?
There are no big Australian online retailers of books. Or anything else, really, certainly nothing you could call the local equivalent of Amazon.
  #17  
Old 10-23-2013, 10:54 PM
UDS UDS is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,779
Quote:
Originally Posted by tellyworth View Post
There are no big Australian online retailers of books. Or anything else, really, certainly nothing you could call the local equivalent of Amazon.
Fishpond.com.au - which I believe is actually based in New Zealand - tries to fill that particular gap, I think, at least as far as books go. But I, and most people I know, use bookdepository.co.uk for preference.
  #18  
Old 10-23-2013, 11:06 PM
tellyworth tellyworth is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 2,142
Fishpond is a dropshipper. They don't actually stock anything, and their shipping times are often several weeks. So I don't think they really count as an Amazon equivalent.
  #19  
Old 10-23-2013, 11:43 PM
Ranger Jeff Ranger Jeff is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 6,607
I think they're afraid of all the dropbears and box jellyfish. The venomous snakes aren't such an issue anymore as a lot of them have been bitten by the spiders there and have died.
  #20  
Old 10-24-2013, 12:25 AM
Shakester Shakester is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 2,909
I've bought plenty of stuff from Amazon over the years, including a Kindle a few years ago. I am in Australia.

There is some stuff that Amazon won't ship to Aus, due to big companies having monopolies and insisting on price gouging Australians, but a large amount of Amazon stuff is available to Australians. In fact they keep sending me spam inviting me to browse their list of stuff they will ship to Australia.
  #21  
Old 10-24-2013, 03:22 AM
jabiru jabiru is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,001
I seldom buy from Amazon these days because their international shipping prices are massive. I have a Kindle but, thanks to corporate bullying by the larger publishing companies, eBooks are frequently not available here or are considerably more expensive than in the US.

I usually check out the cheapest price on Booko and buy from the supplier with the best deal - usually book depository, who have free shipping.
  #22  
Old 10-24-2013, 03:48 AM
don't ask don't ask is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 17,678
What ebooks can't you get? I have a Kobo reader loaded with books but I buy Kindle books on Amazon and use the Kindle reader apps on my PC, phone and tablet.
  #23  
Old 10-24-2013, 05:11 AM
Princhester Princhester is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 14,257
Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
What ebooks can't you get? I have a Kobo reader loaded with books but I buy Kindle books on Amazon and use the Kindle reader apps on my PC, phone and tablet.
I, um, heard that you can get software that will usually allow you to hack Kindle books so you can load and read them on a Kobo, despite the protections Amazon attempt.
  #24  
Old 10-24-2013, 05:25 AM
jabiru jabiru is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
What ebooks can't you get? I have a Kobo reader loaded with books but I buy Kindle books on Amazon and use the Kindle reader apps on my PC, phone and tablet.
I can't remember now but there aren't many. I've simply got a message saying that the publisher doesn't allow this particular eBook to be sold in Australia. No idea why not.

I also used to get emails alerting me to eBooks which were, for a short time, really reduced in price. Most didn't interest me but there was one book I wanted to buy which was 99 cents, according to the email. When I went to Amazon to buy it, the price to me was $9.99. I emailed the sender of the alert asking why and they said the publisher set the price. No bargains for Aussies. :-(

Last edited by jabiru; 10-24-2013 at 05:29 AM. Reason: Remembered something else.
  #25  
Old 10-24-2013, 07:48 AM
don't ask don't ask is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 17,678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Princhester View Post
I, um, heard that you can get software that will usually allow you to hack Kindle books so you can load and read them on a Kobo, despite the protections Amazon attempt.
I have tried that with unsatisfactory results. Presumably I am doing something terribly wrong because one can find thousands of ebooks to download in both epub and mobi formats with no DRM. The Kindle books I have bought aren't terribly popular, so not otherwise available, and are cheap. The reading option is excellent really because the books are synced across all my devices. And I've always been one of those people reading several books at a time, so it is nice opening up one on my phone and zipping through to where I last was on my tablet or PC.
  #26  
Old 10-24-2013, 07:54 AM
Eliahna Eliahna is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 7,635
It's no Amazon substitute, but booko.com.au searches for the cheapest price inc postage on books and gives you a list to compare. I find it very useful.
  #27  
Old 10-24-2013, 08:09 AM
Grumman Grumman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 8,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
Fishpond.com.au - which I believe is actually based in New Zealand - tries to fill that particular gap, I think, at least as far as books go. But I, and most people I know, use bookdepository.co.uk for preference.
I've also used The Book Depository and was very happy with their service. For an Australian, "free international shipping" are the three sweetest words in the English language.
  #28  
Old 10-24-2013, 08:09 AM
don't ask don't ask is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 17,678
And booko.com.au links to The National Library so you can find every library in Australia that has copies of the book.

Last edited by don't ask; 10-24-2013 at 08:10 AM.
  #29  
Old 10-24-2013, 08:36 AM
jabiru jabiru is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumman View Post
For an Australian, "free international shipping" are the three sweetest words in the English language.
Indeed. Not Kindle, Amazon or even book related but I read today that M & S in the UK have free international shipping. Can't wait to let my fingers do the walking.
  #30  
Old 10-24-2013, 03:53 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 71,777
If you're not in a big city in Australia, is interlibrary loan a realistic or useful option, or do you have to wait a really long time to get what you want?
  #31  
Old 10-24-2013, 05:24 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 30,612
I've sold to Aussies from my amazon Marketplace Account, & it's easy to lose your shirt that way.
Large books cost a ton to mail down Under.
__________________
The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.
~~~~Hunter S. Thompson
  #32  
Old 10-24-2013, 08:09 PM
jabiru jabiru is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor View Post
I've sold to Aussies from my amazon Marketplace Account, & it's easy to lose your shirt that way.
Large books cost a ton to mail down Under.
I get that mailing an actual book costs a lot. Ebooks, however, should not.

High postal charges aren't just one-way. I recently returned some books to a friend in Scotland. >$50 to send three paperbacks.
  #33  
Old 10-24-2013, 08:54 PM
Zakalwe Zakalwe is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 4,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabiru View Post
Ebooks, however, should not.
You guys do know that book rights are generally sold by country, right? It might be that the publisher of the eBook doesn't have the Australian rights and thus can't sell there without violating their contract with the author.
  #34  
Old 10-24-2013, 09:04 PM
UDS UDS is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumman View Post
I've also used The Book Depository and was very happy with their service. For an Australian, "free international shipping" are the three sweetest words in the English language.
It's not actually free, of course, since bookdepository simply roll up the postage charge in the price they quote you. (They know where you live! And if you lived somewhere else they would quote you a different price.) Still, the postage-inclusive prices they quote are usually pretty attractive.
  #35  
Old 10-24-2013, 09:15 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: rhode island
Posts: 37,376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
You would think Amazon might choose to serve only, say, the three biggest Australian cities, or within six hours' drive of whatever distribution hub(s) they choose to set up. Just writing off the entire country seems odd.
Looks to me like almost everybody living in Australia would qualify with those criteria. It is odd that they're being ignored.
  #36  
Old 10-24-2013, 09:25 PM
jabiru jabiru is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zakalwe View Post
You guys do know that book rights are generally sold by country, right? It might be that the publisher of the eBook doesn't have the Australian rights and thus can't sell there without violating their contract with the author.
I can buy a paperback or a hard cover book for the same price (in US dollars) as anyone in the US, excluding shipping costs. So it's clear the author and/or publisher are quite happy for me to actually buy and read the book, just not in electronic format.
  #37  
Old 10-24-2013, 09:26 PM
jabiru jabiru is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
It's not actually free, of course, since bookdepository simply roll up the postage charge in the price they quote you. (They know where you live! And if you lived somewhere else they would quote you a different price.) Still, the postage-inclusive prices they quote are usually pretty attractive.
Except that book depository is generally the cheapest option even if they do roll their shipping costs into the over all price.
  #38  
Old 10-25-2013, 04:36 AM
Eliahna Eliahna is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 7,635
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
It's not actually free, of course, since bookdepository simply roll up the postage charge in the price they quote you. (They know where you live! And if you lived somewhere else they would quote you a different price.) Still, the postage-inclusive prices they quote are usually pretty attractive.
We linked to booko upthread. Run pretty much any book you care to name through it and it will rank retailers by cheapest price including postage. Bookdepository is almost always near the top of the list, way above Australian retailers who only pay domestic shipping (it's that parallel imports thing - our books are so expensive, I've been ordering autographed special editions of Terry Pratchett's new releases from the UK for close to the RRP of an ordinary, unsigned, not special version of the same book from any Australian book store).
  #39  
Old 10-25-2013, 04:59 AM
UDS UDS is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 7,779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eliahna View Post
We linked to booko upthread. Run pretty much any book you care to name through it and it will rank retailers by cheapest price including postage. Bookdepository is almost always near the top of the list, way above Australian retailers who only pay domestic shipping (it's that parallel imports thing - our books are so expensive, I've been ordering autographed special editions of Terry Pratchett's new releases from the UK for close to the RRP of an ordinary, unsigned, not special version of the same book from any Australian book store).
Sure. And as a consumer I don't actually care about the breakdown between postage costs and the retailer's take; I'm just interested in the total cost to me, and Bookdepository's total cost is generally very competitive.

It's not just the parallel import thing, though. That might explain why Bookdepository is cheaper than Dymocks, but it wouldn't explain why Bookdepository is cheaper than Amazon US, as it very often is. Maybe shipping costs from the US to Australia are greater than shipping costs from the UK to Australia, although there's no obvious reason why that should be so. Maybe Bookdepository is finding other efficiencies. I don't know.
  #40  
Old 10-25-2013, 05:19 AM
Martini Enfield Martini Enfield is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,292
I've often wondered why Amazon don't have a presence here either - I mean, there's an Amazon.ca and that seems a bit odd since you'd think the US operation could handle Canada as well.

Besides the extortionate shipping Amazon charges to Australia (frequently as much or even more than the item itself), there's a baffling array of stuff which they won't ship here - often mundane stuff like pens, watches, clothes and so forth. And that's not including their digital music services and the like which are unavailable here.

Some of the challenges they'd need to overcome have been mentioned (vast distances, no competitively priced large-scale courier services) but I think a lot of people would be happy to have their stuff come by Australia Post as long as they didn't have to pay $100 for a pair of Levis anymore.
  #41  
Old 10-25-2013, 05:48 AM
Francis Vaughan Francis Vaughan is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Posts: 4,586
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martini Enfield View Post
but I think a lot of people would be happy to have their stuff come by Australia Post as long as they didn't have to pay $100 for a pair of Levis anymore.
I think Australia Post should be talking very very earnestly with Amazon. As I mentioned above, Oz Post are trying to drag themselves out from a long term decline in relevance and profitability by concentrating on internet sales delivery. A large company like Amazon that is capable of doing large scale drop-offs to the regional distribution centres Oz Post operates would find a very useful and willing partner.

Oz Post are looking at providing pickup centres as well, where you can go after hours and pick up parcels left during the day. These can be secure, and parcels can be signed for. Thus providing a cheap trackable delivery mechanism. Tracking being what appears to be the missing link in affordable parcel delivery for Oz customers. If they were to link this to cheap sea born cargo shipping, everyone would win. Expensive goods still run the gauntlet of taxes and clearing charges, but there should be a way to avoid the insane prices we are slugged with at the moment.
  #42  
Old 10-25-2013, 08:48 AM
bibliophage bibliophage is offline
Charter Member
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Maine
Posts: 10,192
For those who didn't know, Amazon bought The Book Depository a couple years back. I'm not sure why Amazon maintains both The Book Depository and Amazon.co.uk. In my experience, The Book Depository has better prices when shipping to the US is included. I wonder if it has something to do with TBD being based on Guernsey, which is a crown dependency and not legally part of the UK.
  #43  
Old 10-26-2013, 12:02 AM
Martini Enfield Martini Enfield is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis Vaughan View Post
I think Australia Post should be talking very very earnestly with Amazon. As I mentioned above, Oz Post are trying to drag themselves out from a long term decline in relevance and profitability by concentrating on internet sales delivery. A large company like Amazon that is capable of doing large scale drop-offs to the regional distribution centres Oz Post operates would find a very useful and willing partner.

Oz Post are looking at providing pickup centres as well, where you can go after hours and pick up parcels left during the day. These can be secure, and parcels can be signed for. Thus providing a cheap trackable delivery mechanism. Tracking being what appears to be the missing link in affordable parcel delivery for Oz customers. If they were to link this to cheap sea born cargo shipping, everyone would win. Expensive goods still run the gauntlet of taxes and clearing charges, but there should be a way to avoid the insane prices we are slugged with at the moment.
I agree with this, and I agree there's definitely a hole in the International Delivery To Australia market between "Item flown here in its own private aeroplane at vast expense" and "It gets here when it gets here".

I also think there's a bit of a chicken-and-egg thing happening in that courier services cost a fortune because there isn't the demand for millions of packages to be sent all over the country daily, but the lack of a service which can deliver millions of packages daily and at a competitive price is hampering the ability of someone like Amazon to set up here.

It will be interesting to see how Australia Post's repositioning goes. Personally, I think they're doing the right thing, especially considering New Zealand Post is looking at cutting its mail service back to three days a week(!) due to lack of profitability (and a reported decrease in the number of letters being sent).

Last edited by Martini Enfield; 10-26-2013 at 12:02 AM.
  #44  
Old 10-26-2013, 05:31 AM
Meurglys Meurglys is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 2,233
Quote:
Why isn't Amazon in Australia?
Because they have the Murray, darling!
  #45  
Old 10-26-2013, 06:41 AM
Richard Pearse Richard Pearse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: On the outside looking in
Posts: 9,976
Quote:
Originally Posted by UDS View Post
It's not actually free, of course, since bookdepository simply roll up the postage charge in the price they quote you. (They know where you live! And if you lived somewhere else they would quote you a different price.) Still, the postage-inclusive prices they quote are usually pretty attractive.
Actually a lot of things available online from the UK have free shipping. It's likely because they don't have to charge us VAT, a type of sales tax, so they can advertise the same price they advertise to UK customers and the shipping is absorbed by the VAT. I get lots of bicycle stuff from the UK.
  #46  
Old 10-26-2013, 06:47 AM
don't ask don't ask is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 17,678
No overseas business will set up in Australia if they have any sense. Australia Post are signatories to an international postage agreement that means they have had to raise charges for local deliveries by 30% or more to subsidize their loss making delivery of overseas packages. They cannot raise charges for overseas shipments so overseas internet sellers have huge advantages over any business trying to ship within Australia.

Postage costs soar by 30% as online retail booms
  #47  
Old 10-26-2013, 06:51 AM
Martini Enfield Martini Enfield is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
No overseas business will set up in Australia if they have any sense. Australia Post are signatories to an international postage agreement that means they have had to raise charges for local deliveries by 30% or more to subsidize their loss making delivery of overseas packages. They cannot raise charges for overseas shipments so overseas internet sellers have huge advantages over any business trying to ship within Australia.

Postage costs soar by 30% as online retail booms
To be fair, we're talking about the cost of sending a letter rising from 45c to 60c. Not exactly vast sums of money for the average punter.
  #48  
Old 10-26-2013, 06:53 AM
don't ask don't ask is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 17,678
No we are talking about overnight increases of several dollars per package for internet sales within Australia.

Quote:
The rises, which come into effect on Monday, also mean the cost of getting a signature on delivery, a requirement for most online sellers, almost triples from $1 to $2.95.

Online retailers say the changes are a ''direct hit'' on their businesses and they have no option but to charge customers more.

Australia Post defends the increases, saying it is ''operating in a challenging business environment with increasing external costs''.

Jackie Harper of Dubbo, who sells cloth nappies online, said she would now have to pay more than $11 every time she sent a package. Last week it was about $7.

''These prices are passed on to the customers and need to be paid each time an order is sent,'' Ms Harper said.

Last edited by don't ask; 10-26-2013 at 06:56 AM.
  #49  
Old 10-26-2013, 06:59 AM
Martini Enfield Martini Enfield is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 10,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
No we are talking about overnight increases of several dollars per package for internet sales within Australia.
I can't say I've some across "signature on delivery" being a requirement for most online businesses here, but to be fair I don't do a lot of domestic online shopping since I'd (usually) rather pay a bit extra (buying from an actual shop) and have the item now and not sometime next week.
  #50  
Old 10-26-2013, 07:07 AM
don't ask don't ask is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 17,678
Check out booko.com.au and you'll see why it is pointless for overseas operators to start shipping from within Australia. All the free shipping comes from overseas. I can buy books from England for less than the $7 or so that an Australian based business will charge me to mail it from the next suburb. They have to charge that because Australia Post charge them that. If they were in Hong Kong however they would only have to pay what Hong Kong post charge them.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:51 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017