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Old 01-22-2009, 04:59 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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Quickest way to reduce soft drink carbonation?

As weird as it sounds, I prefer my soft drinks to be as flat as possible. I really dislike carbonation (it's the unpleasant throat-burning sensation that's at the top of my reasoning). My current method of ridding a bottle of carbonation involves shaking, then slowly releasing the cap until the carbonation bubbles near spillage, then closing, waiting, and starting all over again.

Are there any other methods or tricks of getting rid of a drink's carbonation as quickly as possible? Any food-safe chemicals I can add to make CO2 go bye-bye? I know leaving a drink out at room temperature will result in quicker carbonation loss, but it's not very practical when you want to drink it and it's warm...
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:11 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Open the bottle a few days ahead of time. Leave the cap on loosely. It'll go flat.
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:16 PM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Add some barium chloride to the drink. Unles you want to actually drink it. Then don't do that. Maybe iron sulfate would do the trick. Still, don't drink it.
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:27 PM
Osip Osip is offline
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what about warming the soda. I seem to recall CO2 content is greater in a cold soda.

Take a warm soda and pop the top and wait an hour or two.
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:31 PM
garygnu garygnu is online now
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Make like The Cars and shake it up.
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:34 PM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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Thanks for the suggestions but... so far they're either dangerous or slow, two conditions I specifically did not want as specified in my OP.
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:35 PM
longPath longPath is offline
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One word: Mentos

Practical and entertaining demonstration here
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Old 01-22-2009, 05:38 PM
drastic_quench drastic_quench is offline
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Some folks like to drink hot Dr. Pepper - heating it up on the stove. I suppose you could heat up your soda a 2 liter at a time, then re-bottle it and refrigerate.
  #9  
Old 01-22-2009, 05:48 PM
Quartz Quartz is online now
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Try pouring it out into a glass, then tip that glass into another glass.
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Old 01-22-2009, 06:00 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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Mechanical agitation is already the best way. Your problem is, your container leaves no room for the gas to escape without bringing some of the drink with it. Pour your 16 oz bottle into a 2 litre bottle and try shaking that.
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Old 01-22-2009, 06:00 PM
WarmNPrickly WarmNPrickly is offline
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Buy the syrup from a distributor and add water to your liking.
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Old 01-22-2009, 06:28 PM
Electronic Chaos Electronic Chaos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quartz View Post
Try pouring it out into a glass, then tip that glass into another glass.
This.

More specifically, pour into a glass (a glass with ice works best), and stir it around a couple times with a spoon.

I used to do this as a kid when I'd drink Vernor's ginger ale.

You could also maybe add a pinch or two of table salt and wait for the fizz to go down.

EDIT: Or go with WarmNPrickly's suggestion. It might actually be best to go through a restaurant, though. Ask the manager if they have any that are about to go out of date that they wouldn't mind "losing track of." If I recall correctly, the 5 gallon bag-in-boxes of syrup are somewhere around $20-$30. I'm sure if you ask around enough, you could find someone willing to part with them.

Last edited by Electronic Chaos; 01-22-2009 at 06:32 PM.
  #13  
Old 01-22-2009, 06:30 PM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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Can't you just stir it?
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Old 01-22-2009, 06:59 PM
Hockey Monkey Hockey Monkey is offline
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Yeah, if I ever want to de-fizz a drink, I just stir it vigorously for a couple minutes.
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Old 01-22-2009, 07:03 PM
Vox Imperatoris Vox Imperatoris is offline
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  #16  
Old 01-22-2009, 07:55 PM
Sue Duhnym Sue Duhnym is offline
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You can buy cola syrup at most pharmacies, though you may have to order directly from the pharmacy and wait a couple of days. People use it to soothe an upset stomach.

Here: http://www.drugstore.com/search/sear...Ntt=cola+syrup

Last edited by Sue Duhnym; 01-22-2009 at 07:58 PM.
  #17  
Old 01-22-2009, 08:01 PM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
Are there any other methods or tricks of getting rid of a drink's carbonation as quickly as possible? Any food-safe chemicals I can add to make CO2 go bye-bye? I know leaving a drink out at room temperature will result in quicker carbonation loss, but it's not very practical when you want to drink it and it's warm...
Pour a glass and leave some room, like half full on a 32oz cup. Sprinkle a little sugar in it, just a generous pinch should do. It should fizz up as the the sugar forces the CO2 out of the solution.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:41 PM
HMS Irruncible HMS Irruncible is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
Are there any other methods or tricks of getting rid of a drink's carbonation as quickly as possible? Any food-safe chemicals I can add to make CO2 go bye-bye? I know leaving a drink out at room temperature will result in quicker carbonation loss, but it's not very practical when you want to drink it and it's warm...
Whenever I used to get the sort of stomach virus where you can't keep anything down, my mother's remedy would be to take a large plastic tumbler (like 32oz) and pour a cold coke into it from a height of 12-18 inches. This removed most of the carbonation. If it has to be absolutely flat, you can do that a few more times.

Last edited by HMS Irruncible; 01-22-2009 at 08:41 PM.
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Old 01-22-2009, 08:44 PM
HMS Irruncible HMS Irruncible is online now
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Originally Posted by drachillix View Post
Pour a glass and leave some room, like half full on a 32oz cup. Sprinkle a little sugar in it, just a generous pinch should do. It should fizz up as the the sugar forces the CO2 out of the solution.
I don't think this is right. IIRC the only substance that would force CO2 out of solution is more CO2. There is no reason a beverage that already contains massive amounts of sugar would react that strongly to another pinch of sugar.
  #20  
Old 01-22-2009, 08:57 PM
Qadgop the Mercotan Qadgop the Mercotan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonR View Post
Thanks for the suggestions but... so far they're either dangerous or slow, two conditions I specifically did not want as specified in my OP.
Pouring an open bottle of soda takes mere seconds. That and some pre-planning.
  #21  
Old 01-22-2009, 09:00 PM
eleanorigby eleanorigby is offline
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How is loosening the cap and letting it go flat taking too long? Once it's flat, it's flat for all time.
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Old 01-22-2009, 09:03 PM
Man With a Cat Man With a Cat is offline
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When I was in Europe (the first time, '73 or so), it was everyone's habit to sprinkle a little salt into it. The head came down, but I don't recall if it actually flattened the soda or not.
  #23  
Old 01-22-2009, 09:42 PM
Joey P Joey P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sue Duhnym View Post
You can buy cola syrup at most pharmacies, though you may have to order directly from the pharmacy and wait a couple of days. People use it to soothe an upset stomach.

Here: http://www.drugstore.com/search/sear...Ntt=cola+syrup
You can also buy it at Sam's Club.
  #24  
Old 01-22-2009, 09:48 PM
Electronic Chaos Electronic Chaos is offline
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Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
I don't think this is right. IIRC the only substance that would force CO2 out of solution is more CO2. There is no reason a beverage that already contains massive amounts of sugar would react that strongly to another pinch of sugar.
Eh, it's not really forcing it out as it is kind of providing an outlet for it to come out. It's the same idea as putting Mentos in Diet Coke. The sugar, being grainy, provides nucleation points for the CO2 to form bubbles in.
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:43 AM
crowmanyclouds crowmanyclouds is offline
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Pour the soda into a wide mouthed container to create a large surface area for the CO2 to escape and prevent the Mentos effect. Add clean sand, instead of sugar or salt, to provide nucleation sites for the CO2. Stir 'till flat and serve through a fine mesh strainer?

CMC fnord!
  #26  
Old 01-23-2009, 05:57 AM
Pushkin Pushkin is offline
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I've found that pouring any carbonated drink into a ceramic mug or cup provides a lot of foam and then a flat drink.
  #27  
Old 01-23-2009, 06:45 PM
J-P L J-P L is offline
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As Quartz sugested, pouring the drink from glas to glass is the recommended method by nurses to removed carbonation from sodas. I understand that flat Coke (or Pepsi) is sometime given to children to releive constipation (or some other stomach illness).
  #28  
Old 01-24-2009, 07:44 AM
BrandonR BrandonR is offline
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Originally Posted by eleanorigby View Post
How is loosening the cap and letting it go flat taking too long? Once it's flat, it's flat for all time.
I'm talking about length of time from purchasing the drink to being able to drink it with no carbonation. Just loosening the cap would be effective if I bought a large number of drinks and planned to drink them later, but if I wanted to drink them ASAP with no carbonation, it looks like I'll have to go with the pouring method. I do plan on trying it today...
  #29  
Old 01-24-2009, 12:27 PM
Santo Rugger Santo Rugger is offline
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Get a large glass, and fill it 1/2 way (or keep 1/2 of it empty, your choice).

Use one of those protein drink mixers to stir the heck out of it.

That ought to do the trick.
  #30  
Old 01-24-2009, 01:57 PM
Ottoerotic Ottoerotic is offline
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I feel your pain, here's what I do with soda bottles.

I open it and take one horrible carbonated ship. This frees up room in the bottle, I then loosely place the cap on it and squeeze as much air out of the bottle as possible. I screw the cap on tightly and slightly shake it causing the released CO2 to expand inside the bottle and it's shape to return to normal. I then open the bottle again and squeeze out the air and CO2 a second time.

Close the cap and repeat, this time usually enough of the initial CO2 has left the bottle andI can shake it pretty vigorously without worrying about it overflowing. Repeat as necessary, but I think at most I've had to repeat it only 3 times to get a perfectly flattened soda.

Works great and it only takes about 15 seconds.

Works horribly with canned soda tho...
  #31  
Old 01-26-2009, 01:25 PM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
I don't think this is right. IIRC the only substance that would force CO2 out of solution is more CO2. There is no reason a beverage that already contains massive amounts of sugar would react that strongly to another pinch of sugar.
The CO2 in solution is not very stable thus creating the fizziness we see/experience. A solid like sugar dissolves into a more stable solution, its been a while since chemistry for me but soda is a solution supersaturated with a gas. The gas precipitates out as bubbles. By placing something else into the solution you are forcing the less stable solution to precipitate out. This is why the mentos bomb works.

I dont know the name of this "binding strength of a solution" property but I'm sure its well defined and documented in a way that some of our doper chemistry gurus can articulate.
  #32  
Old 01-26-2009, 02:18 PM
norinew norinew is offline
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Whenever I need flat Coke or ginger ale for a kid with a tummy ailment, I pour it in a larger-than-necessary cup and then stir it vigorously for a few seconds (30-60).

Since weight-loss surgery that reduced the size of my stomach, I use a form of this for my beer, too. I pour it into an over-sized glass and stir it until it's half flat.
  #33  
Old 01-26-2009, 02:47 PM
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I have the same problem. The way I solve it is that I microwave a glass of pop for a minute or so. That gets rid of a lot. Then I drink it. If I want it colder, I can add ice.
  #34  
Old 08-12-2010, 05:16 PM
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Whenever I get a can of diet soda in a restaurant that is at room temperature and pour it on ice, it loses a lot of carbonation, to the point I think it is too flat.

Does this happen with sugar soda?

If you have a container wide enough for a handheld eggbeater, that would be an enjoyable way to remove carbonation.

Or get one of those handheld drink mixers with a spinning wavy disk at the end of a shaft.

Last edited by swkenney; 08-12-2010 at 05:17 PM. Reason: spelling
  #35  
Old 08-12-2010, 05:35 PM
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The easiest and most portable way to do it (in my opinion) is to use a straw. Just blow into the straw slowly and gently to make bubbles in the drink. It goes flat in no time and will work with bottles and cans without the need to carry around another recepticle in case you buy a drink while you are out.
  #36  
Old 08-13-2010, 01:35 AM
Quartz Quartz is online now
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Unholy fizzy zombie brains, Batman!
  #37  
Old 08-13-2010, 01:50 AM
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  #38  
Old 08-13-2010, 03:35 AM
constanze constanze is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cosmic Relief View Post
Whenever I used to get the sort of stomach virus where you can't keep anything down, my mother's remedy would be to take a large plastic tumbler (like 32oz) and pour a cold coke into it from a height of 12-18 inches. This removed most of the carbonation. If it has to be absolutely flat, you can do that a few more times.
Hijack: You know that Cola is contra-indicted for stomach flus and Diarhea, even though it was popular in the 50s onward with mothers? The coffeine forces even more fluid out of the body. I would recommend either flat mineral water (can you not buy non-sparkling mineral water in your country?) or even better, WHOs Oral Rehydrating Mix. / Hijack
  #39  
Old 08-13-2010, 07:06 AM
Machine Elf Machine Elf is offline
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Eh, it's not really forcing it out as it is kind of providing an outlet for it to come out. It's the same idea as putting Mentos in Diet Coke. The sugar, being grainy, provides nucleation points for the CO2 to form bubbles in.
This. Creating/providing nucleation sites is the key to getting the CO2 to come out of solution. When you first open a bottle or can, the beverage is super-saturated with CO2. The CO2 wants to come out of solution, but it happens slowly because the dissolved CO2 needs nucleation sites where this can happen. A nucleation site can be a free surface (e.g. the top surface of the beverage, or the surface of a submerged CO2 bubble), or a rough solid surface (e.g. grains of sugar or salt). In chemistry classes we were always advised to add boiling chips (basically small chunks of cracked porcelain) to test tubes of water that were being heated; the chips provided nucleation sites, facilitating a nice smooth boiling action rather than intermittent explosive steam generation that could shatter the test tube and spew hot water all over. This could work for the OP: add a teaspoon of boiling chips to the bottom of the glass before pouring in the soda. This would avoid altering the taste of the uncarbonated beverage like salt or sugar would.

Since the surfaces of submerged bubbles act as nucleation sites, another answer is to create more bubbles. The act of pouring the soda from a significant height, or transferring from one glass to another, or stirring it vigorously, or blowing air through a straw to the bottom of the glass, creates more bubbles by entraining air into the soda. This is why shaking a can/bottle of soda prior to opening it causes rapid escape of CO2 upon opening of the container: lots of pre-existing bubbles (from the shaking) provide a great many nucleation sites for CO2 to come out of solution as soon as the pressure is released by opening the cap.

So there are any number of ways to get the CO2 out of solution fairly quickly, but the challenge seems to be controlling the production of foam. That's going to come down to how fast you pour it, or how much extra space you leave in your glass to accomodate the highest level of foam. Unlike beer, soda foam seems to settle down within seconds, so it's probably not worth the trouble to explore solutions here.
  #40  
Old 03-11-2017, 11:24 AM
smuir smuir is offline
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Quick Way to Remove Carbonation

When I'm in a hurry, I pour a half can into a glass then, using a glass of similar size, pour it back and forth from one glass to the other until all bubbles go away...takes 6-8 "pours."
  #41  
Old 03-11-2017, 11:44 AM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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I'm guessing the urgency has waned in the last 8 years.
  #42  
Old 03-11-2017, 12:00 PM
CC CC is offline
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I imagine it's flat by now.
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Old 03-11-2017, 12:07 PM
running coach running coach is online now
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I imagine it's flat by now.
Probably evaporated.
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Old 03-11-2017, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by smuir View Post
When I'm in a hurry, I pour a half can into a glass then, using a glass of similar size, pour it back and forth from one glass to the other until all bubbles go away...takes 6-8 "pours."

Apparently it has taken you 7 years to get rid of those bubbles?
  #45  
Old 03-11-2017, 03:40 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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Originally Posted by Ottoerotic View Post
I feel your pain, here's what I do with soda bottles.

I open it and take one horrible carbonated ship. This frees up room in the bottle, I then loosely place the cap on it and squeeze as much air out of the bottle as possible. I screw the cap on tightly and slightly shake it causing the released CO2 to expand inside the bottle and it's shape to return to normal. I then open the bottle again and squeeze out the air and CO2 a second time.

Close the cap and repeat, this time usually enough of the initial CO2 has left the bottle andI can shake it pretty vigorously without worrying about it overflowing. Repeat as necessary, but I think at most I've had to repeat it only 3 times to get a perfectly flattened soda.
I do this exact same thing
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