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Old 09-27-2016, 05:22 AM
Jim B. Jim B. is online now
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Daily Requirement of Protein.

I guess you could say I am more conscious of my daily intake of certain nutrients, than the average person. I have ulcerative colitis (presently in remission merci Dieu). And I have been told it is very important to eat a diet high in fiber and protein.

The fiber I've got covered. I easily get the daily requirement. And it is easy to tabulate too. I take fiber supplements, and eat food high in fiber too. And each time I do, I look at the label, and know exactly how much of the requirement of fiber I am consuming. But not so with protein.

I just looked at the nutrition label of two food items in my kitchen. A can of clam chowder and a carton of deli sliced ham. The chowder had 6 grams of protein and the ham 10. Neither said what percentage of the daily value this was. Why not?

I know they sometimes leave out the daily percentage, if the amount is so trivial, there is no point in even telling you. But ham is high in protein, so that isn't likely.

What is the daily recommended value of protein, according the USDA? And why do they rarely ever tell you, on food labels?

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  #2  
Old 09-27-2016, 05:52 AM
engineer_comp_geek engineer_comp_geek is online now
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The amount of protein you should eat varies with your age, weight, recommended calorie intake, and other factors. There's no one simple number that they can print onto a can as it varies too much.

See this document (warning, pdf):
http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/sites/defau.../PolicyDoc.pdf
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Old 09-27-2016, 06:04 AM
coremelt coremelt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engineer_comp_geek View Post
There's no one simple number that they can print onto a can as it varies too much.
Yes but there is the dietary reference intake numbers, which are 0.6 grams per KG of body weight or 0.38 grams per pound. This amounts to: 56 grams per day for the average sedentary man. 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman.

That's a really low number and a fair amount of nutritionists argue that out of a 2000 calorie reference diet, more should be protein and less should be carbs, than the DRI numbers.
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Old 09-27-2016, 06:08 AM
armedmonkey armedmonkey is offline
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Here's a handy little calculator from the USDA to calculate your specific RDI for various nutrients, including protein. As to why percentages of protein RDI aren't listed on the packaging, I really don't know. If I were to guess though, I would guess that protein RDI is heavily dependent on weight and activity, so it will vary from person to person so much that a blanket number for everybody would be too inaccurate for many people.
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Old 09-27-2016, 07:38 AM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Those of us with chronic kidney disease need to limit our daily protein intake.
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Old 09-27-2016, 07:44 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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As I recall, protein is primarily essential for growth. Once you reach full-grown adulthood, the need for protein falls considerably, and it's not really essential at all, unless you are in a healing process from injury or illness. But substantial protein is essential for growing children, as much as they can get, so it can't really be quantified as a RDA.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-27-2016 at 07:46 AM.
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Old 09-27-2016, 07:47 AM
Nava Nava is offline
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Or working out a lot, or just for wear-and-tear replacement... proteins include several elements which are not present in fats and carbs, the other two macro-nutrient groups. Most people will get enough protein for daily adult needs without having to specifically seek it out, but it's still possible to manage to be protein-deficient.
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Old 09-27-2016, 09:03 AM
running coach running coach is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
As I recall, protein is primarily essential for growth. Once you reach full-grown adulthood, the need for protein falls considerably, and it's not really essential at all, unless you are in a healing process from injury or illness. But substantial protein is essential for growing children, as much as they can get, so it can't really be quantified as a RDA.
You break down tissue constantly, protein is very much essential for any age.
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Old 09-27-2016, 10:20 AM
Exapno Mapcase Exapno Mapcase is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
As I recall, protein is primarily essential for growth. Once you reach full-grown adulthood, the need for protein falls considerably, and it's not really essential at all, unless you are in a healing process from injury or illness. But substantial protein is essential for growing children, as much as they can get, so it can't really be quantified as a RDA.
Or any of a variety of conditions, really. People who have bariatric surgery need to get high amounts of protein in their diet because it is no longer as well digested by the shortened intestines.

On the subject of whether we get enough or too much protein in the average diet:
Quote:
For a relatively active adult, eating enough protein to meet the RDA would supply as little as 10% of his or her total daily calories. In comparison, the average American consumes around 16% of his or her daily calories in the form of protein, from both plant and animal sources.

The Protein Summit reports in AJCN argue that 16% is anything but excessive. In fact, the reports suggest that Americans may eat too little protein, not too much. The potential benefits of higher protein intake, these researchers argue, include preserving muscle strength despite aging and maintaining a lean, fat-burning physique. Some studies described in the summit reports suggest that protein is more effective if you space it out over the day’s meals and snacks, rather than loading up at dinner like many Americans do.

Based on the totality of the research presented at the summit, Rodriguez estimates that taking in up to twice the RDA of protein “is a safe and good range to aim for.” This equates roughly to 15% to 25% of total daily calories, although it could be above or below this range depending on your age, sex, and activity level. That range fits nicely into the recommendation from the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans that we get 10% to 35% of daily calories from protein.

The OP should definitely talk to his doctor or a nutritionist.
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Old 09-27-2016, 10:44 AM
Cartoonacy Cartoonacy is offline
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I can't recall ever seeing a label with the protein amount that didn't include the RDA. I have a bag of edamame right here on my desk, and it says "Serving size: 1/3 cup (30g)... Protein 13g... % Daily Value 26%... based on a 2,000 calorie diet."
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Old 09-27-2016, 03:03 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
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One item I recall reading about evolution - thanks to our carnivorous ways, we developed big brains. The consumption of meat, which was concentrated protein, gave us the nutrition to feed larger brains. The brain consumes a significant amount of our daily energy requirements.

Last edited by md2000; 09-27-2016 at 03:04 PM.
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Old 09-30-2016, 07:16 AM
Broomstick Broomstick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coremelt View Post
Yes but there is the dietary reference intake numbers, which are 0.6 grams per KG of body weight or 0.38 grams per pound. This amounts to: 56 grams per day for the average sedentary man. 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman.

That's a really low number and a fair amount of nutritionists argue that out of a 2000 calorie reference diet, more should be protein and less should be carbs, than the DRI numbers.
There's a difference between "amount needed to avoid overt problems" and "amount needed to optimize health".

Protein needs between two adult humans of the same height, weight, gender, and age can vary considerably depending on activity level, type of activity, recent injury or illness, and chronic conditions that can impact nutritional needs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
As I recall, protein is primarily essential for growth. Once you reach full-grown adulthood, the need for protein falls considerably, and it's not really essential at all, unless you are in a healing process from injury or illness.
Untrue. While adults are not growing they still require protein for maintenance as well as repair of body tissues.
  #13  
Old 09-30-2016, 12:49 PM
guitario guitario is offline
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In today's world, it's very difficult to become deficient in any nutrient if you're healthy and eat a couple of normal meals a day.. but obviously certain people have different needs.

For example, if you're a natural bodybuilder, you're going to want around 1 gram of protein per lb of bodyweight. That's going to help you grow, and much more won't make any real difference. So for the average guy, maybe around 150-180g per day.

For a bodybuilder taking testosterone, you're going to want around 250g a day at least to maximise the protein synthesis potential of the drug.

For those with health issues in the sense of it could be dangerous having too little protein, then find the RDA as issued by your government and add some more protein on top.. it doesn't have to be exact - but as an example, eating 'normally', then addings say, a can of tuna on top, or something like that - you're probably covered.

This is a very vague answer I know, but it's still quite difficult to be deficient in protein if you're eating 2000 calories per day.

Also, protein contains essential and non essential amino acids. The most complete protein sources include white meats, eggs, beef and tuna. Sources that have an incomplete amino acid profile may include the likes of pork and soya. Basically, if your protein sources include the former, then you don't have to eat as much protein compared to a diet comprising of the latter.

It sounds complicated, but a couple of days worth of Googling around the subject will give you all the info you could ever need. Google Protein bio-availability list or biological value for a run down on the best protein sources.

Last edited by guitario; 09-30-2016 at 12:50 PM.
  #14  
Old 10-01-2016, 02:54 PM
x-ray vision x-ray vision is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guitario View Post
For example, if you're a natural bodybuilder, you're going to want around 1 gram of protein per lb of bodyweight. That's going to help you grow, and much more won't make any real difference. So for the average guy, maybe around 150-180g per day.
More can make a real difference.

https://www.researchgate.net/publica...Higher_Intakes

Quote:
For a bodybuilder taking testosterone, you're going to want around 250g a day at least to maximise the protein synthesis potential of the drug.
At what body weight? Cite?

Quote:
Sources that have an incomplete amino acid profile may include the likes of pork and soya.
Both are complete proteins.
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