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Old 08-29-2014, 05:15 PM
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Khadaji's Whatcha Readin' thread - September 2014


Well here we are, summer reading is about over and time to gear up for fall! So what are you reading this autumn?

I am currently reading the second John Rain book Hard Rain by Barry Eisler. It's quirky and a bit violent but I can't really cry over yakuza getting hurt. *I know, I'm a bad, bad, bad person!*






Khadaji was one of the earlier members of the SDMB, and he was well known as a kindly person who always had something encouraging to say, particularly in the self-improvement threads. He was also a voracious, omnivorous reader; and he started these monthly book threads. Sadly, he passed away in January 2013, and it was decided that we should rename these monthly threads in his honour.
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Old 08-29-2014, 06:24 PM
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Finished Lock In and Legend; still working on Kludge and the book on pentecostalism.
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Old 08-29-2014, 07:28 PM
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Just finished The Pelican Brief, John Grisham's third novel. Very good. More of an action thriller than a legal procedural. Two US Supreme Court justices -- the oldest and the youngest -- are brutally murdered hours apart by what appears to be the same assassin or group of assassins. The two justices were not similar ideologically, and the authorities are stumped for a motive. Then a second-year law student stumbles across the motive, and now she's being hunted.

Next up is a more recent Grisham: The Broker.
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Old 08-29-2014, 09:06 PM
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Just finished The Pelican Brief, John Grisham's third novel. Very good. More of an action thriller than a legal procedural. Two US Supreme Court justices -- the oldest and the youngest -- are brutally murdered hours apart by what appears to be the same assassin or group of assassins. The two justices were not similar ideologically, and the authorities are stumped for a motive. Then a second-year law student stumbles across the motive, and now she's being hunted.

Next up is a more recent Grisham: The Broker.
Almost forgot. A fun part of The Pelican Brief for me was when the protagonist hod out for a while in the Tabard Inn in Washington. That's a wonderfully quirky little place. The wife and I stayed there two years ago. Recommended.
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:03 AM
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I just got Carthage from the library and am going to dive in tonight. It looks really big and I only have till 9/17.
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Old 08-30-2014, 09:35 AM
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I reread The Adventures of Roderick Random; time to load up some new books on the ol' e-reader!
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Old 08-31-2014, 02:03 PM
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I just read Kate Atkinsons' Life After Life and Jo Walton's My Real Children more or less back to back. It was a fascinating juxtaposition, because they're both about alternate lifelines for the main character, although there are dozens of lifelines in Atkinson's book and only two in Walton's. I enjoyed both of them. I found it intriguing how the Atkinson's Ursula differed so much across the different life courses, but Walton's Patricia ended up in essentially the same place, despite making very different choices along the way.
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Old 08-31-2014, 02:34 PM
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Read Post Office by Charles Bukowski. I had liked the two previous Henry Chinaski novels very much, but that one was BRILLIANT. Chapters 13 and 14 made me cry; then it got better. I'm normally a Victorian, Booker Prizewinner kind of reader, but Bukowski... he is good.

Read Promises to Keep by Katharine Tree. Entertaining stuff, and she sure has set the stage for the next book to go kersplooey. Here's a land mine, and here's a land mine, and here's a land mine... which one will get stepped on first?

And I am still about 35% through Written In My Own Heart's Blood by Diana Gabaldon. I love Outlanders books 1 and 4-6 with a passion, but the Revolutionary War stuff just turns me off, and I cannot make myself care about either William or Lord John. Alas.
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Old 08-31-2014, 03:32 PM
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I wish My Real Children were available on Audible.
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Old 08-31-2014, 06:05 PM
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I bought a copy of Jo Nesbo's new book The Son and mentioned it at work. A colleague suggested I should read his books in order, so The Son is back on the shelf while I'm reading The Bat with others to follow, should I enjoy the first one enough to want to continue.
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Old 08-31-2014, 07:06 PM
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I've finally gotten into Ryu Mitsuse's 10 Billion Days and 100 Billion Nights after buying it in May. Good stuff so far, especially the chapter "Maitreya", which is filled with great descriptions of fascinatingly dream-like imagery.
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Old 08-31-2014, 08:23 PM
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I bought a copy of Jo Nesbo's new book The Son and mentioned it at work. A colleague suggested I should read his books in order, so The Son is back on the shelf while I'm reading The Bat with others to follow, should I enjoy the first one enough to want to continue.
I just picked up a copy of The Bat as well. I need to finish the book I am currently reading, then I will dive into it.
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Old 08-31-2014, 08:32 PM
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I just read Kate Atkinsons' Life After Life....
I read that and liked it very much, although the
SPOILER:
Hitler subplot seemed a little contrived/done before.


Just zipped through Serenity: The Shepherd's Tale by Joss Whedon et al., a 2010 graphic novel giving much of the backstory of the enigmatic Firefly clergyman. The plot was more or less in reverse chronological order and had some interesting points; the artwork, however, was crude.

Picked up Archie: 1000-page Comics Bonanza, a new reissue, on sale. I was a big Archie fan as a kid, and it's fun to see these stories again. Veronica and Betty are beautiful in any era, but seeing their and the guys' clothes change over time is funny - from bow ties and plaid pants to surfer gear and T-shirts.

On the home stretch in George R.R. Martin's Dreamsongs, Vol. I, a collection of his reminiscences and early short stories including "Sandkings," the first story of his I ever read and long a favorite, and (new to me) "The Meathouse Man," a deeply weird story about, er, hightech necrophilia.

Finally gave up on Tom Vanderbilt's Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do almost halfway through. Just didn't hold my interest, and there are other things I wanted to read more.

Last edited by Elendil's Heir; 08-31-2014 at 08:32 PM.
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Old 08-31-2014, 09:23 PM
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Just finished re-reading an old favourite: Jerome K. Jerome's Three Men in a Boat (to say nothing of the Dog!).

It's about three young clerks in the Victorian period who go on a fortnight long boating trip on the Thames. Not a lot happens, but it's the way it doesn't happen that is funny. It's got some wry smiles, some chuckles, and some laugh-out-loud bits.

It's also a lovely little snap-shot of a moment in mid-Victorian time and society.
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:21 PM
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Just finished re-reading an old favourite: Jerome K. Jerome's Three Men in a Boat (to say nothing of the Dog!).

It's about three young clerks in the Victorian period who go on a fortnight long boating trip on the Thames. Not a lot happens, but it's the way it doesn't happen that is funny. It's got some wry smiles, some chuckles, and some laugh-out-loud bits.

It's also a lovely little snap-shot of a moment in mid-Victorian time and society.
I love that book! You might like Three in Norway by Two of Them, by Walter J. Clutterbuck, published in 1882, which supposedly was the inspiration for Three Men in a Boat. It's about three British men spending a summer hunting and fishing in Norway. It's available from Project Gutenberg.


I just finished an interesting read: The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, by Deborah Blum. It's about the efforts of the NYC chief medical examiner and a dedicated toxicologist to investigate poisonings, both accidental and deliberate, in the 1920's. The book focuses on several specific poisons: chloroform (still used in surgeries, used to subdue robbery victims); wood alcohol (killed thousands during Prohibition, as did industrial alcohol which was deliberately poisoned by the government); cyanide (widely used in fumigation, popular for suicides); arsenic, mercury, radium (those poor factory girls painting radium on watch faces), carbon monoxide, and thallium (sold in depilatory creams, used for pest control).
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:33 PM
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The White War by Mark Thompson, a thorough enough history of the Italian Front of WWI with plenty of stuff I didn't know (or consider: such as that Gabriel D'Annunzio really was the Ayn Rand of his age).

Unfortunately, it omits equal treatment and equally interesting coverage of the Austro-Hungarians' perspective (as these books always seem to do), and entirely omits the minimal yet interesting involvement of the US Army in the last days (hours, actually) of Italy's war.
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:36 AM
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I believe I spotted Time Warped: Unlocking the Mysteries of Time Perception by Claudia Hammond on the New Books shelf of the library; I picked it up & found it to be a somewhat repetitive, but interesting contemplation of how we perceive time.
Hammond weaves together research in neuroscience and psychology with real-life narratives of hostages and other isolated individuals, sprinkling in literary items as well (Proust, Constantine, etc). Synesthesia was touched on, as well as several amnesia cases. She wraps up the book with some general techniques for dealing with time passing too slowly or too quickly, based on the findings discussed previously.

One scenario to determine how you view yourself relative to the passing of time I found quite interesting. A meeting you have scheduled for Wednesday was moved up two days. What day of the week is meeting now on?
My answer was "Friday" ... which she linked to the perspective of the self moving forward to the future. An answer of "Monday" relates more to the feeling that the future is moving towards you. Either way - there's a potential of mis-communication with the other meeting attendees!

I did have one minor quibble - she states that while we often speak of time in distance terms (a "long" time) - we don't do the reverse. Maybe that's her UK bias showing, but here in the MidWest US, it's common to speak of destinations being X hours away... (where approx 60 miles = 1 hour).

Recommended to those with an interest in pop psychology and case studies - worth at least a library read.
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:40 AM
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The White War by Mark Thompson... entirely omits the minimal yet interesting involvement of the US Army in the last days (hours, actually) of Italy's war.
Never heard of that. Tell me more, please, either here or in a PM. Thanks!
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:43 AM
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Interesting, Politzania. I'm also Midwestern and it hadn't occurred to me that there could be confusion about a meeting being "moved up". Because if it had been moved to Friday, it would have been "moved back". It's so weird to come across these pitfalls.

That makes me think of a line from Hamlet. Somebody says "the future is yet behind" or something similar; I just tried to Google the line and couldn't find it... but anyway, the assumption is that one moves through time while facing the past, because that's the part of it you can see. The future is unseen, so your back must be to it.
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:45 AM
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I had to give up on The Hundred-Year House. I started it last Thursday, read more on Friday, and still wasnít hooked. I knew I wouldnít pick it up again after the three-day weekend, so back to the library it went.

Now on to a haunted house novel from the 70s, Burnt Offerings by Robert Marasco. The writing feels weird and dated, but Iím liking the story so far.
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Old 09-02-2014, 10:07 AM
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Just finished Nick Harkaway's Tigerman. Amazing, heartbreaking and magnificent.

Just in time, too. The Bone Clocks by Mitchell and Acceptance, the third novel in VanderMeer's Southern Reach trilogy dropped into my kindle last night.
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Old 09-02-2014, 10:15 AM
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I bought a copy of Jo Nesbo's new book The Son and mentioned it at work. A colleague suggested I should read his books in order, so The Son is back on the shelf while I'm reading The Bat with others to follow, should I enjoy the first one enough to want to continue.
It isn't necessary: The Son is a stand-alone, not part of his long-running detective series.
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Old 09-02-2014, 11:19 AM
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I did have one minor quibble - she states that while we often speak of time in distance terms (a "long" time) - we don't do the reverse. Maybe that's her UK bias showing, but here in the MidWest US, it's common to speak of destinations being X hours away... (where approx 60 miles = 1 hour).

Recommended to those with an interest in pop psychology and case studies - worth at least a library read.
Yeah we do that out here in the Wild West as well. I canNOT tell you how many miles it is to my sister's house but I know it's roughly an 11 to 12 hour drive at *ahem* 80 to 85 miles per hour.

Also if I wer told a meeting had been moved up two days I would assume it was two days earlier. I don't know if that's because I'm in Utah or if that's because I'm me.

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Old 09-02-2014, 11:54 AM
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One scenario to determine how you view yourself relative to the passing of time I found quite interesting. A meeting you have scheduled for Wednesday was moved up two days. What day of the week is meeting now on?
My answer was "Friday" ... which she linked to the perspective of the self moving forward to the future. An answer of "Monday" relates more to the feeling that the future is moving towards you. Either way - there's a potential of mis-communication with the other meeting attendees!
This book sounds interesting, thanks for the info!

The way I learned it at secretarial class (a million years ago) was that if a meeting set for the second Wednesday of the month needs to be changed to the first Wednesday of the month, it is literally moving UP on a written calendar and that is why we say "the meeting has been moved up." But this instruction also came with a caution that it was potentially confusing for people and that you should always write out the new date in the memo.

My most recent read was The Glass Sentence, by S.E. Grove, which is a fantasy/adventure novel, aimed at middle grade readers. It was really awesome. It presents a world that had some sort of "time disruption" event, so that Boston is stuck in the mid 19th century, and England is in the Middle Ages, for example. It doesn't get too into how exactly that works, it's the kind of thing where you have just roll with it. I think it's one of the best children's lit fantasy stories to come out in recent years.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:19 PM
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I need to preface this with a short rant: People who write in library books need to be drug out into the street and shot. I had to read John Scalzi's The Android's Dream with an eraser in my hand to remove some wag's editing and opinions of the novel. Fortunately this flaming jackass wrote in pencil, as opposed to the one who wrote in a copy of Damia with a pen. I had to take a white-out wand to that one.

Although I can understand the editorial corrections. Someone at Tor Books needs to learn how to proofread. Also, am I the only person in this fading republic who knows how to spell Ocracoke correctly? Okracoke is not a city on the Outer Banks, it's a nasty soda flavor.

Rant over.

Other than that, Android's Dream was a fun read with lots of unexpected twists and turns. I really enjoy Scalzi's take on interplanetary law. He did a good job with that in both this book and Fuzzy Nation. I felt bad about Archie, though. He didn't deserve his fate.

And with that I end my trek through all the John Scalzi at my local library. Next up is Poul Anderson. Hopefully Scribbles McGee hasn't read any of those novels.

Last edited by Catamount; 09-02-2014 at 07:19 PM.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:28 PM
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I just finished Charles Stross' The Rhesus Chart, fifth book in the adventures of Bob Howard, one-time IT admin at a secretive British agency dedicated to covering up the existence of Cthulhu-style abominations from beyond time and space. Stross evidently is developing a plot running through the books as we approach the time when the starts are aligned. In this one, vampires cause problems for Mr. Howard. I am enjoying this series; I like the mix of eldrich abominations and project management.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:47 PM
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It isn't necessary: The Son is a stand-alone, not part of his long-running detective series.
Yes, I didn't realise this at first but, having started at the beginning (with The Bat), I've decided to proceed in an orderly fashion.

I was disappointed in The Bat and I'm not sure why. I was left feeling cheated at the end but I will read the next book, since I already have it from the library. He's a popular author, so perhaps his books got better later on.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:51 PM
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I just finished reading book 3 of Lev Grossman's trilogy, The Magician's Land, for the second time. Previous to that, I re-read Diana Wynne Jones' last (sob) book, The Islands of Chaldea, which was completed by her sister Ursula. I really loved them both.

I am back to book 3 of the Craft Sequence by Max Gladstone, Full Fathom Five, which I started a while ago and put aside for the above. It's LONG, I keep looking at my kindle's progress bar which seems to do nothing. It's not as good as the first, which I really enjoyed and gobbled up on a camping trip, but, I think, better than the second, which hasn't left much of an impression. I like the world, the interesting way religion influences the characters' lives, and good characterization. I'll keep reading them, I guess.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:52 PM
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Oh, forgot to mention my current read.

When I was in the library, collecting my reserved copy of Cockroaches, the second book written by Jo Nesbo, I spotted a book called Kinsey and Me, which I thought was about how Sue Grafton came to write her Alphabet series books, how she sees Kinsey and other insights. It's not; it's a book of short stories, a format which I don't like for mystery/crime etc books.

I'll persevere unto the end, though, because I'm that kind of person. Except when I'm not.
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Old 09-02-2014, 07:53 PM
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I bought Kinsey and Me almost six months ago, jabiru, and so far have read two stories. I agree with you about the format and I hope you get further than I did!
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Old 09-02-2014, 08:24 PM
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I bought Kinsey and Me almost six months ago, jabiru, and so far have read two stories. I agree with you about the format and I hope you get further than I did!
I've read the first two. I will press on for the time being but I've become a reader who's time is running out and there are way too many good books out there for me to waste time on something I'm not enjoying. I will give it a bit longer but I can definitely see me returning it unfinished.
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Old 09-02-2014, 09:09 PM
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Yes, I didn't realise this at first but, having started at the beginning (with The Bat), I've decided to proceed in an orderly fashion.

I was disappointed in The Bat and I'm not sure why. I was left feeling cheated at the end but I will read the next book, since I already have it from the library. He's a popular author, so perhaps his books got better later on.
I didn't like The Bat, but did enjoy The Redbreast, so I agree that you should give him another try.
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Old 09-02-2014, 10:24 PM
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Other than that, Android's Dream was a fun read with lots of unexpected twists and turns. I really enjoy Scalzi's take on interplanetary law. He did a good job with that in both this book and Fuzzy Nation. I felt bad about Archie, though. He didn't deserve his fate.

And with that I end my trek through all the John Scalzi at my local library. Next up is Poul Anderson. Hopefully Scribbles McGee hasn't read any of those novels.
Scalzi just published a prequel novella and its novel (Lock Out). The novel has a tone similar to The Android's Dream.
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Old 09-02-2014, 10:35 PM
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...I did have one minor quibble - she states that while we often speak of time in distance terms (a "long" time) - we don't do the reverse. Maybe that's her UK bias showing, but here in the MidWest US, it's common to speak of destinations being X hours away... (where approx 60 miles = 1 hour)....
Mark Twain once said, "In Europe a hundred miles is a long way, and in America a hundred years is a long time."

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...Now on to a haunted house novel from the 70s, Burnt Offerings by Robert Marasco. The writing feels weird and dated, but Iím liking the story so far.
You knew there was a 1976 movie?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burnt_Offerings_(film)
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Old 09-03-2014, 01:10 AM
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I didn't like The Bat, but did enjoy The Redbreast, so I agree that you should give him another try.
Thank you. I shall persevere.
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Old 09-03-2014, 08:31 AM
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I just finished Charles Stross' The Rhesus Chart, fifth book in the adventures of Bob Howard, one-time IT admin at a secretive British agency dedicated to covering up the existence of Cthulhu-style abominations from beyond time and space. Stross evidently is developing a plot running through the books as we approach the time when the starts are aligned. In this one, vampires cause problems for Mr. Howard. I am enjoying this series; I like the mix of eldrich abominations and project management.
Then I highly recommend Resume With Monsters.

http://www.amazon.com/Resume-Monster...+with+monsters
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Old 09-03-2014, 08:39 AM
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No, but Iíd like to see it sometime. I finished the book this morning and thought it was great. It performed just as that kind of tale ought to do and was a fun ride (though predictable).

Next up will very likely be I Shall Wear Midnight, which Iíve been pushing away because itís the last Nac Mac Feegle Tiffany Aching book.
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Old 09-03-2014, 10:06 AM
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Next up will very likely be I Shall Wear Midnight, which Iíve been pushing away because itís the last Nac Mac Feegle Tiffany Aching book.
Personally, I feel its one of PTerry's best books. Tiffany is growing up very well and she'll be a fine successor to Granny. And I think it's the only Discworld book that made me cry not from laughter but from emotion.
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Old 09-03-2014, 10:15 AM
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Well goodness from famine to well some rainfall, I have won another book from a Goodreads Giveaway.

The Birth of the Pill: How Four Crusaders Reinvented Sex and Launched a Revolution

This should be an interesting read
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Old 09-03-2014, 11:42 AM
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...

Read Promises to Keep by Katharine Tree. Entertaining stuff, and she sure has set the stage for the next book to go kersplooey. Here's a land mine, and here's a land mine, and here's a land mine... which one will get stepped on first?

...
Yeah, just finished* that myself and book three in the series should definitely be interesting. This author seems to be coming into her own. Hope I don't have to reread the first two to refresh my memory (like I had to with the Outlander series 'cause it took so damn long)

Also just finished* "Magic Casement" the the first of a four book "A Man of his Word" series by Dave Duncan. Pretty damn good. I've read Dave Duncan over the years (he's hard to find in most bookshops and virtually impossible to find in a library so yay amazon kindle!) and always enjoyed him. Really epic adventure fantasy at it's finest.

And a shout out to Connie Willis. Just finished* "Impossible Things", a collection of her short stories. I'm not really fond of short stories but it was the last thing of hers I could find that I hadn't read. It was excellent too, of course. I hate when I find a fabulous author and there's nothing left of theirs to read.

*realized I've 'just finished' a few too many books. Need to stop reading so much and go do something...
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Old 09-03-2014, 12:42 PM
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Interesting, Politzania. I'm also Midwestern and it hadn't occurred to me that there could be confusion about a meeting being "moved up". Because if it had been moved to Friday, it would have been "moved back". It's so weird to come across these pitfalls.
I was referring to the "distance never expressed by time" statement of the author in terms of living in the MidWest or other more wide-open spaces, I can say that Chicago is about 2 hours away from me, and Indianapolis a little over an hour and most people who live in the area know exactly what I mean (1 hr = approx 60 miles) - but I'm not sure those living in more urban areas would get it right away.

I think the "moved up" = Monday vs Fri is more an individual thing - my husband (Indiana born & bred) gave the opposite answer from me. It also hadn't occurred to me that there were two potential answers to the question until I stopped & thought about it.
  #42  
Old 09-04-2014, 11:19 AM
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Based on my enjoyment of Bad Science , I'm in the middle of Bad Pharma.

A bit more technical in terms of understanding research reporting protocols, but still quite interesting (if not depressing).
  #43  
Old 09-04-2014, 01:36 PM
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I finished Hard Rain by Barry Eisler, I liked it and will continue with the series. Our hero is a little brutal, but that's to be expected in an assasin. The book did suffer from a few pacing issues but overall was enjoyable. It will go on my shelve intstead of into the pile to sell or donate.

My Review of Hard Rain

Up next The Bat by Jo Nesbo, which I see several people were disappointed with...
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Old 09-05-2014, 01:31 AM
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Up next The Bat by Jo Nesbo, which I see several people were disappointed with...
I hope you return to this thread with your opinion on the book. I'm going to start reading Cockroaches when I'm finished with my current read.
  #45  
Old 09-05-2014, 05:59 AM
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I hope you return to this thread with your opinion on the book. I'm going to start reading Cockroaches when I'm finished with my current read.
I will

I'm only 30 pages in but it's.... different. I keep think my other favorite police dee Harry would have torn Australia apart by now in frustration at being sidelined.. I mean the circus, reallY?
  #46  
Old 09-05-2014, 12:13 PM
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Thanks to Grrlbrarian, I picked up Corvus: A Life with Birds by Esther Woolfson from the library & am almost done.

It's a quick read - being a memoir about living in a Scotland city with various feathered friends over the years - primarily Chicken, a rook, but also a talking magpie named Spike, and a crow named Ziki, as well as some odd psittacines and of course, the residents of the dovecote.
It's all a bit cozy - Woolfson throws in some scientific background here & there and a few literary references as well. The artwork is a nice addition to the material.

Worth a read if you're into stories of people and their animal companions.
  #47  
Old 09-05-2014, 01:56 PM
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I'm currently about halfway through The Pain Scale by Tyler Dilts: it's the second in his Long Beach Homicide series, and I started it within hours of finishing the first book in the series (A King of Infinite Space). I must admit I'm enjoying these stories and the main character, though Dilts's writing is at times distracting: like when a character in the first book was born 7 years after me yet finished college 2 years before I did, and not because she was a prodigy (just an editor who's bad at math, I suppose). There is also a recurring character he uses the same odd simile to describe in both books, and it was almost annoying. It might not have stood out to someone who hadn't just read the first book, though. Anyway, like I said, I'm enjoying the series so far and am looking forward to finishing this and moving on to #3 (A Cold and Broken Hallelujah).

Before I started A King of Infinite Space, I attempted to read actor Dan Bucatinsky's autobiography Does This Baby Make Me Look Straight?: Confessions of a Gay Dad. I really wanted to like both it and him, but about halfway through I gave up. I rarely give up on books. He sets a bad tone early on by describing an extraordinarily self-centered young Dan, of whom he's either unapologetic or unaware (it's hard to tell). The writing is ok, and the "character" gets better after he meets his partner and starts talking about the adoption process, but the stories he told were...kind of boring. And there remained just a whiff of the same old immaturity. It wasn't enough to make me dislike him, but it was enough to make me stop reading the book.
  #48  
Old 09-05-2014, 04:21 PM
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Last week, I finished a Lord Peter WImsey mystery plus the last two books in Lois Lowry's Giver quartet (Messenger and Son)

I'm now about 20% of the way io Edith Wharton's House of Mirth.
  #49  
Old 09-05-2014, 04:55 PM
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I am 100 pages into The Bat by Jo Nesbo, and can someone tell me: is there a plot in there? And why if you were going to write a travel book about colorful Australian characters did you feel the need to tack on a rape/murder, sir?
  #50  
Old 09-05-2014, 08:11 PM
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Just finished Skin Game, the latest Harry Dresden book by Jim Butcher. It's intense.

Now reading Richard Hooker's MASH, the novel that the movie and the TV series were based on.
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