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Old 03-28-2015, 07:51 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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The 'It's The First Time I Made This' cookery thread

A couple of weeks ago I made something I don't know what it is, but kind of a chicken dumpling casserole. Obviously that was the first time, since I made it up as I went along. Last week I made stuffed bell peppers for the first time. I mean, how hard could it be? Harder than getting them already made, or having someone's mother make them; but really not hard at all.

And that, the stuffed bell peppers, is the gist of this thread. What have you made that you've never made before? Maybe you've eaten it a hundred times before. You just never made it. Until now.

Everyone likes fish cakes, right? How many times have I had them? 'How hard can it be?' Pretty easy. Why haven't I made it before? Tonka the Cat (and later, Creamsicle) was very pleased with the dish of fish juice I drained from a 14(?) oz. can of wild-caught salmon. I mashed the salmon up in a medium-sized Pyrex bowl and added finely-minced yellow onion, bread crumbs, dried parsley, minced garlic, an egg, mayonnaise, and some Old Bay seasoning. I mixed it all up and formed it into eight patties, and put them in the fridge while I made the lemon-dill Béchamel sauce the SO likes to much. The sauce finished, I cooked the patties four at a time in a cast-iron frying pan with corn oil in it. Buttered Brussels sprouts were the veg. We each had two fish cakes. I'd have more, but I filled up on the sprouts. The SO said the fish cakes are delicious. ('Don't put them away! I might have some more!')

So, campers... I mean 'cookers'... what have you made for the first time, and how did it turn out?
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2015, 08:22 PM
Miss Woodhouse Miss Woodhouse is offline
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I tried cheese souffle a few weeks ago for the first time. It went fantastically. I am an awesome souffle maker apparently.

It helps that I was using an ATK recipe with a good base and I'm a very experienced cook.

I've made it a second time since and also had it turn out great. I think it's going into the regular rotation. With meat prices going up a little bit of egg and cheese and milk is a much cheaper dinner alternative. Who knew we would ever live in a world where souffle was cheaper and easier than hamburgers?

Last edited by Miss Woodhouse; 03-28-2015 at 08:22 PM.
  #3  
Old 03-28-2015, 09:07 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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I don't think I've ever even had a soufflé!
  #4  
Old 03-29-2015, 12:38 AM
Snooooopy Snooooopy is offline
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I got a slow cooker as a Christmas present and have been making a number of things for the first time. My first attempt was a vegetable curry. It was a little bland, and I learned to be more aware of how many servings the recipe indicates, because I made a LOT of goddamn food. My second attempt was chana masala, and other than it being somewhat watery, I was pleased. I would have felt reasonably confident feeding it to other people. My third dish was a red lentil dal. It was a bit of a risky pick given that I didn't know if I had ever had lentils before, but I felt that it turned out well. I am improving, however slowly!
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:03 AM
Eddie F. Eddie F. is offline
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About 6 - 8 years ago, I decided that I wanted to make fettuccine Alfredo in the comfort of my own home. I tried a recipe that was the same as this one, for all intents and purposes. And I was surprised at how easy a dish and tasty a dish it was.

Also, about two years ago, I stumbled upon this recipe, and I can say without hesitation, that it is the best damned appetizer/dip recipe that I've ever made, or will ever make (very likely).
  #6  
Old 03-29-2015, 01:23 AM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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EVERYBODY likes fish cakes?

Well, maybe, I guess. But speaking for myself, I haven't YET found a frosting to put on one that doesn't make me gag.
  #7  
Old 03-29-2015, 04:18 PM
Sandra Battye Sandra Battye is offline
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When I lived in Southern California there was a restaurant chain that served pies. The pie that I was addicted to was called French Silk. It was so decedent and rich. I assumed that it was very difficult and time consuming to make. Cut to last Christmas season when I was looking for a pie recipe that was different from the same old stuff and decided to see if Food Network had this one. They did and it was so easy, used very few ingredients and it tasted better than I remembered. (I go with a chocolate cookie crumb crust.)
  #8  
Old 03-29-2015, 05:08 PM
MissTake MissTake is offline
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I'll let you know in an hour or so, after my first attempt at sausage and spinach stuffed shells is cleaned up.
Last weekend, TheKid went a little nuts and made a couple of coffee cakes for a meeting I had at work. Now, this child is a trained pastry chef. She can make fancy schmancy French petit fours, make pulled sugar flowers-but never made old fashioned coffee cakes. They were fabulous.
  #9  
Old 03-29-2015, 05:22 PM
seal_cleaner seal_cleaner is offline
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Chicken croquettes! I had them years ago at Willie's Diner (I think) in Bloomfield NJ. You don't see them on menus any where. I made some, based on Joy of Cooking. Fudged the details and some of the ingredients, but I enjoyed them. Kinda labor-intensive.

Last edited by seal_cleaner; 03-29-2015 at 05:23 PM. Reason: Speling
  #10  
Old 03-29-2015, 05:59 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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Here's something I haven't tried yet. Any advice would be appreciated.

Sausage rolls.

I have some bangers in the freezer, and a box of pastry dough. I thought I'd 'skin my sausage', if you know what I mean, and roll the meat into a log that is the length of the dough, then roll it up, slice it up into 2" to 3" chunks, and bake it until the dough is pretty. (Note: The sausages are uncooked.)

Good plan? Bad plan?
  #11  
Old 03-29-2015, 06:46 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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I made egg drop soup for the first time 2 weeks ago. Or rather, I made it correctly for the first time.

What the hell is egg drop soup other than soup with some egg drizzled into it? BZZZZZT!!!!

Who knew? I followed the recipe in the NYT magazine to a T, and then added just a few things: A little bit of Sesame Seed Oil, some Low Sodium Soy Sauce and some Udon noodles. Holy shit was it good. And it was hearty enough to have for dinner (thanks to the Udon). It's all (well, mostly) in the corn starch-- mouth feel, baby, mouth feel. You have to thicken the soup to give it that mouth feel.

I made a big bowl:

2 cups chicken stock plus 1/2 cup water brought to a boil. Lower to simmer and add:

1 diced garlic clove
5 peper corns
1 length of ginger, diced (length of ~ 1 1/2 - 2")
5 sprigs of cilantro

Simmer for 20 minutes. (This adds important, subtle flavors)

Add 1 1/2 teaspoons of corns starch dissolved in white wine (and some soy sauce and sesame seed oil).

Add Udon (cooked separately)

Stir, and slowly add 1 egg beaten with 1/2 teaspoon corn starch. Let set of 10 minutes, and pour in to a large bowl with 2 chopped scallions (chopped very thinly)

Absolutely delicious. It seems like a lot of work for "just" egg drop soup, but it's just the 20 minutes of simmering that takes time. The rest is pretty quick.

I may even try Hot and Sour soup one of these days, but that requires a LOT of special ingredients.

Last edited by John Mace; 03-29-2015 at 06:49 PM.
  #12  
Old 03-29-2015, 07:20 PM
MissTake MissTake is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTake View Post
I'll let you know in an hour or so, after my first attempt at sausage and spinach stuffed shells is cleaned up.
Verdict? Pretty darned good. I actually aced the bechamel! Only drawback was the sausage. Bought it at Whole Foods, had a slightly fishy taste. And, I could've tossed in more spinach - there's no such thing as too much spinach.
  #13  
Old 03-29-2015, 07:21 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Not my story, but worth sharing:
I was subbing in a math class on March 12, the day before Pi Day (observed), and the teacher was giving extra credit for any students who brought in pie (more points for homemade). A couple of students, despite never having made a pie before, were bound and determined that they were going to make lemon meringue. I tried to warn them that meringue is extremely touchy, and that lemon meringue was therefore about the hardest possible pie they could start with, but in the end, I just decided that, one way or another, they were going to get a learning experience out of it.

I'm still not sure how it turned out.
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Old 03-29-2015, 09:22 PM
stui magpie stui magpie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
Here's something I haven't tried yet. Any advice would be appreciated.

Sausage rolls.

I have some bangers in the freezer, and a box of pastry dough. I thought I'd 'skin my sausage', if you know what I mean, and roll the meat into a log that is the length of the dough, then roll it up, slice it up into 2" to 3" chunks, and bake it until the dough is pretty. (Note: The sausages are uncooked.)

Good plan? Bad plan?
Depends on what kind of bangers. If they're just plain ones, I'd personally tart them up a bit. Skin them and add in a bit of diced onion, maybe a bit of garlic, some lemon zest, salt and pepper, parsley, that kind of stuff. Oh, and an Egg.

Puff pastry is best.
  #15  
Old 03-29-2015, 10:13 PM
Hershele Ostropoler Hershele Ostropoler is offline
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Popovers with sourdough starter runoff. Not the first time I'd made popovers, but the first time I'd used Ringo's runoff to do so.
  #16  
Old 03-29-2015, 10:20 PM
Miss Woodhouse Miss Woodhouse is offline
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My high school students love pie day because they get an excuse for a party. My boy brought Nutella cream pie two years in a row because he liked the attention and accolades. He makes it himself. He's very ambitious and fearless in the kitchen.
  #17  
Old 03-30-2015, 02:26 PM
August West August West is offline
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I've only very recently become successful at making bread, after over a decade of making doorstops and paperweights out of flour, water, and yeast.

Armed with my new knowledge I set out to make a dark rye bread with caraway on Saturday and...it worked!

Now I'm kicking myself for cutting the recipe in half, because that first loaf is already gone.
  #18  
Old 03-30-2015, 07:10 PM
rjk rjk is offline
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Years ago, our department had their annual meeting, and one of the managers decided we should have a chocolate-chip cookie contest. I of course mailed back "Do they have to be chocolate chip? Do they even have to be cookies?" I ended up making oatmeal cookies, more or less according to what I found in a book of Doukhobor and Quaker recipes. I didn't have shortening so I used butter (softer texture, but I knew that), and figured that brown sugar has more flavor. Then I had no walnuts or raisins, so I used slivered almonds with some crystallized ginger and enough candied peel to make up the amount. Damn, they were good! I still make them, and sometimes get asked for the recipe. (Last time I also made half a batch, and they're gone. Oh, well.)

More recently (just last week) Zyada and I made some slow-cooker pulled pork that turned out pretty well. The rub recipe was too sweet, but ended up mostly in the drippings, and the meat was great.
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  #19  
Old 03-31-2015, 12:27 AM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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I made a braided loaf of bread - one part honey wheat, one part white, one part dark rye - from scratch. It was glazed and looked very professional, tasted great. Made the no-knead crusty bread, also came out great. Yesterday we attempted General Tsos chicken, very labor intensive and a little soggy. It was good and fun to make, but there's a reason for all those Chinese restaurants out there.
  #20  
Old 03-31-2015, 09:10 AM
August West August West is offline
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Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
I made a braided loaf of bread - one part honey wheat, one part white, one part dark rye - from scratch. It was glazed and looked very professional, tasted great.
Wow, I'm sure there are plenty of tutorials out there but do you have a favorite? Or any guidance?
Quote:
Yesterday we attempted General Tsos chicken, very labor intensive and a little soggy. It was good and fun to make, but there's a reason for all those Chinese restaurants out there.
I've learned that cornstarch is the key to a lot of Chinese cooking. You need enough to get things crispy, but not so much that they get gluey. It's a tightrope.
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Old 04-06-2015, 09:45 PM
salinqmind salinqmind is offline
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We had a soft cover how-to-make-bread book from Borders years ago, and it just gave instructions on making three scaled down bread recipes, then making ropes, braiding them, turning the ends under, an egg wash after letting the loaf rise, and bake. Took a while, lots of ingredients, but not hard to do at all. .

Last edited by salinqmind; 04-06-2015 at 09:46 PM.
  #22  
Old 04-06-2015, 11:17 PM
rowrrbazzle rowrrbazzle is offline
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This weekend I made myself an egg salad sandwich for the first time. Very easy, of course. Over the years, I'd had a few from vending machines at work when I was there late. But the last home-made egg salad sandwich I had must've been when I was in high school, made by my mother.
  #23  
Old 04-06-2015, 11:49 PM
MsKaren MsKaren is offline
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When my kids were young we made a lot of stuff once for the experience. We researched at the library then tried it out. Coconut creme pie from a coconut that involved my husband and a machete. It was wonderful. Pumpkin pie from a pumpkin was good but not wonderful. We made graham crackers, ritz and soda crackers, glazed donuts, Easter leg of lamb, Christmas goose, cream puffs, kugel, dumplings, breads of various kinds, ravioli,...Anything you can think of. Most dessert was too labor intensive to repeat, but all experiments were pretty successful except for the Chinese food. Dang, the egg rolls looked fine but meh. We didn't buy wrappers. We made them ourselves and nope. The other food was OK, but salinqmind is right. There is a reason for all those Chinese restaurants.
  #24  
Old 04-06-2015, 11:53 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
Yesterday we attempted General Tsos chicken, very labor intensive and a little soggy. It was good and fun to make, but there's a reason for all those Chinese restaurants out there.
I make General Tso's Chicken once a year for our traditional homemade Jewish Christmas. The sauce is easy--vinegar, sugar, soy, garlic, ginger, black pepper and chiles. The fried nuggets are a pain if you don't have much experience deep frying. Use boneless thighs because breast meat chunks are overcooked by the time the batter is done.

Speaking of frying, I made crispy salt and pepper shrimp for the first time ever. Start with shrimp still with the shell. Dry them out on a towel, like really dry, as dry as you can. Toss with cornstarch, salt, and pepper. Then fry whole with the shell still on. If you get a hot enough pan the shell turns crispy and crunchy and delicious and you eat the whole thing shell and all. If the pan/oil is not hot enough, the shell turns soggy and rubbery and disgusting. So hotness is key.
  #25  
Old 04-07-2015, 10:46 AM
longhair75 longhair75 is offline
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A couple of weeks ago I made Chicken Fajitas for the first time. It had just never occurred to me to try this before.
  #26  
Old 04-07-2015, 12:16 PM
Nonsuch Nonsuch is offline
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I made duck breast for the first time Sunday. Came out a little less pink than I intended, but it was still juicy, the skin was reasonably crispy and overall I was pleased.
  #27  
Old 04-07-2015, 12:55 PM
prettydorky prettydorky is offline
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I have about 5 things that I can make successfully on rotation, anything else I am usually making it for the first time. Most recent was Paprika Chicken. Tried to find the recipe to link, but with no luck. It was just baked chicken with tons of paprika, thyme, rosemary, butter and lemon.

But the drippings smelled so good that I couldn't bear to throw them out, so I made my first ever pan gravy. Just simmered with a little more butter, didn't even need to add starch because it thickened during the simmer. MAN it was good, and I think being an accident made it even better! We poured it over the chicken and the accompanying pierogies as well.
  #28  
Old 04-07-2015, 01:08 PM
DCnDC DCnDC is online now
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Last week I made jerky for the first time. Marinated in teriyaki and soy sauce overnight, then into the oven at 170 with the door cracked for 4 hours. Came out just okay; I should have sliced the beef thinner and taken it out earlier, but it was a good lesson for next time. I still ate it all.
  #29  
Old 04-07-2015, 01:11 PM
stillownedbysetters stillownedbysetters is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
I made egg drop soup for the first time 2 weeks ago. Or rather, I made it correctly for the first time.

What the hell is egg drop soup other than soup with some egg drizzled into it? BZZZZZT!!!!

Who knew? I followed the recipe in the NYT magazine to a T, and then added just a few things: A little bit of Sesame Seed Oil, some Low Sodium Soy Sauce and some Udon noodles. Holy shit was it good. And it was hearty enough to have for dinner (thanks to the Udon). It's all (well, mostly) in the corn starch-- mouth feel, baby, mouth feel. You have to thicken the soup to give it that mouth feel.

I made a big bowl:

2 cups chicken stock plus 1/2 cup water brought to a boil. Lower to simmer and add:

1 diced garlic clove
5 peper corns
1 length of ginger, diced (length of ~ 1 1/2 - 2")
5 sprigs of cilantro

Simmer for 20 minutes. (This adds important, subtle flavors)

Add 1 1/2 teaspoons of corns starch dissolved in white wine (and some soy sauce and sesame seed oil).

Add Udon (cooked separately)

Stir, and slowly add 1 egg beaten with 1/2 teaspoon corn starch. Let set of 10 minutes, and pour in to a large bowl with 2 chopped scallions (chopped very thinly)

Absolutely delicious. It seems like a lot of work for "just" egg drop soup, but it's just the 20 minutes of simmering that takes time. The rest is pretty quick.

I may even try Hot and Sour soup one of these days, but that requires a LOT of special ingredients.

That is just what I came here to post about!! I always thought it would be some difficult, esoteric, foreign specialty item that I could never master, but lo and behold, it was so easy I make it all the time now. I always keep chicken stock in the freezer, so all I do is thaw that out and add the additional ingredients. I agree about the 20 min simmer, because you want the flavors there, but subtly. I don't add noodles to mine, I like it pristine. I invested in a set of those little bowls and porcelain spoons that Oriental restaurants use and serve it in those. People think I'm a very deft cook indeed! lol
  #30  
Old 04-07-2015, 01:15 PM
NAF1138 NAF1138 is offline
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I recently made creamy polenta with sausage mushroom ragu and garlic fried spinach. Everything in the dish was new to me.

It was simultaneously the easiest and fanciest dish of food I have ever made.

Who knew that polenta was so easy to make? Easier than rice.
  #31  
Old 04-07-2015, 01:44 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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I may have mentioned before the first time I cooked for my gf. I made her osso bucco and it was fantastic. We were sitting around finishing the second bottle of wine and she asked how hard it was to make the meal.

Although it was time consuming, it was technically fairly simple. The only difficult part was finding the veal shanks. I had to drive an hour to get them.

Turns out she hadn't recognized the veal. She didn't eat veal. She had problems with the very idea of veal.
  #32  
Old 04-07-2015, 10:44 PM
Hershele Ostropoler Hershele Ostropoler is offline
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Not exactly first time, but it made an enormous difference in my cooking life when, not long ago, I realized I should treat orzo like rice, not like pasta. Next time I might treat it like risotto.
  #33  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:00 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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An aunt shared one of those quick videos, showing how to make Dutch babies. (Curiously, the recipe does not call for any actual Dutch babies. ) It reminded me of the German apple pancakes I had as a kid in the early-'70s. I think the restaurant was Ricky's in Clairemont (San Diego), but it may have been another place.

So I found this recipe, and made German apple pancakes for the first time today. They turned out great!
  #34  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:20 PM
John Mace John Mace is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
An aunt shared one of those quick videos, showing how to make Dutch babies. (Curiously, the recipe does not call for any actual Dutch babies. ) It reminded me of the German apple pancakes I had as a kid in the early-'70s. I think the restaurant was Ricky's in Clairemont (San Diego), but it may have been another place.

So I found this recipe, and made German apple pancakes for the first time today. They turned out great!
The cookbook I have says that German Babies can be substituted if Dutch Babies are not available. The German ones are a little plumper, not quite as stringy, but still very good. If you can get a German baby from the lower-lying regions of the country, there is hardly any difference at all!

Last edited by John Mace; 12-25-2016 at 02:21 PM.
  #35  
Old 12-25-2016, 02:33 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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I made a couple of new Christmas cookies this year. One was called a 'pizzette', which is a chocolate Italian concoction. Chocolate, almonds, coffee, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, etc. and dipped in a chocolate glaze, then sprinkled with coarse sugar.

The dough was extremely wet and messy. The recipe glibly called for rolling up the dough, then flattening it some and bias-cutting into cookies. HAH! It kept collapsing in a blob and trying to crawl off the counter. I was finally able to get some sort-of cookie shapes out of it, but after baking and glazing, they looked a bit like something you would pick up off your lawn. Good, though.

The other was the orange version of this recipe. They're very nice, with a bright flavor.

After Thanksgiving, I made turkey tikka masala for the first time. It was excellent.
  #36  
Old 12-27-2016, 02:47 PM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
An aunt shared one of those quick videos, showing how to make Dutch babies.
When a Dutch man and a Dutch woman love each other very much . . .
  #37  
Old 12-27-2016, 03:37 PM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
An aunt shared one of those quick videos, showing how to make Dutch babies.
I learned of, and found the recipe for Dutch babies here on the dope. It's a several times of year, special breakfast staple at the Butler household.

I'm a good bread baker, but was terrified of making pita bread for years. Turns out it's super easy. It's become a regular event now, if we've a couple of hours before we want to eat.

This year for Christmas eve, I made a new recipe. Kringle from the King Arthur site. It was a huge success, and I could see a fair number of minor changes to make it in several different ways.
  #38  
Old 12-27-2016, 04:25 PM
Max Torque Max Torque is offline
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Tried making some coconut macaroons for Christmas. Turned out okay, but I need to refine a few things. The outsides got too dry, and I tried to drizzle some chocolate over them for effect, but it was too thick; I need to bake them less, and put my chocolate in a squeeze bottle or something for proper drizzling.
  #39  
Old 03-19-2017, 10:16 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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So I needed some chicken thighs for the jambalaya last month. I was in Costo, and I ended up with a metric buttload of bone-in, skin-on Foster Farms chicken thighs. I thawed a packet out, and it contained two good-sized, and two smaller pieces. So...

Balsamic Chicken Thighs

Brown the chicken on both/all sides in a little olive oil. Reduce the heat, cover, and cook for about 25 minutes (until done). Add some minced onions and minced garlic, and cook for two or three minutes. Deglaze the pan with some white wine (I have some dry sherry in the fridge), add some balsamic vinegar and cook, uncovered, until reduced. Put some sauce on top, too.

We had it with rice cooked in chicken stock with mixed veg, and asparagus

As a bonus 'It's The First Time I Made This' entry, I have scratch-made brownies in the oven. (Normally, I just use a boxed mix.)
  #40  
Old 03-20-2017, 11:42 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I had bought a cute little oval baking dish on sale at Marshall's, and wanted to bake something in it. I chose blueberry crumble, which I had never made before. I wanted crispy, pastrylike crumbs rather than soft crumbly crumbs, so I found an appropriate recipe online.

It was extremely good, but next time I'll add a lot less sugar to the crumble on top. The crumble was as sweet as very sweet cookies, and I wanted them more pie crust-like.

So next time it will be:

1 cup flour
1/3 cup mixed white and brown sugar (not 1 full cup like the recipe called for)
1/2 cup butter
pinch salt
couple of drips of vanilla

Rub it all together, then mix in a splash of buttermilk to make the crumbs stick together slightly. Drop them in little wads and bunches all over the top of sweetened fruit in a baking dish and bake.
  #41  
Old 03-20-2017, 12:16 PM
koeeoaddi koeeoaddi is offline
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It was more of a PITA than I anticipated, but I think I rocked my first attempt at apple babka.
  #42  
Old 03-20-2017, 01:20 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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I made "The Best Lemon Bars" last week. We have a lemon tree and I didn't want the lemons to go to waste. Unfortunately, they were actually the worst lemon bars. I probably needed to bake the shortbread longer in the first step so it would be more cookie-like. It was actually mush, and it absorbed all the lemon mixture so I had a big pan of lemon mush.

No one in the household would eat more than a bite, except for one of the goats, and I think he was just trying to be nice. I threw it away.
  #43  
Old 03-20-2017, 01:56 PM
Robot Arm Robot Arm is offline
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I don't cook often, so I usually follow a cookbook. Just after the section on cooking roasts, there's a recipe for Yorkshire pudding that uses the pan drippings from the roast. I decided to try it one time.

I'd never had Yorkshire pudding. I didn't have the faintest idea what it was supposed to taste, or even look like. And I still don't know. I'm pretty sure mine was wrong, somehow.
  #44  
Old 03-20-2017, 02:38 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
We have a lemon tree
Is it very pretty?
  #45  
Old 03-20-2017, 03:01 PM
romansperson romansperson is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
Here's something I haven't tried yet. Any advice would be appreciated.

Sausage rolls.

I have some bangers in the freezer, and a box of pastry dough. I thought I'd 'skin my sausage', if you know what I mean, and roll the meat into a log that is the length of the dough, then roll it up, slice it up into 2" to 3" chunks, and bake it until the dough is pretty. (Note: The sausages are uncooked.)

Good plan? Bad plan?
Quote:
Originally Posted by stui magpie View Post
Depends on what kind of bangers. If they're just plain ones, I'd personally tart them up a bit. Skin them and add in a bit of diced onion, maybe a bit of garlic, some lemon zest, salt and pepper, parsley, that kind of stuff. Oh, and an Egg.

Puff pastry is best.
I second adding some extra seasoning if the sausage you are using is kind of bland on its own.

When I make sausage rolls I just buy a 1-lb brick of breakfast sausage (I like the kind with extra sage), cut it into 2 pieces and then roll each piece out into a rope that's about 12 inches long.

Roll out one sheet of puff pastry so it's just a titch more than 12 inches long and 10 inches wide. Cut in half lengthwise, and then roll one piece around each sausage rope. Cut each roll into 6 pieces, place on lined baking sheet seam side down, bake at 375 F for 30-35 minutes. Easy and really good.
  #46  
Old 03-20-2017, 03:49 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
Is it very pretty?
But the fruit is impossible to eat!
  #47  
Old 03-21-2017, 02:59 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is online now
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The scratch-made brownies turned out very well. I used more baking powder than called for, and they were still nice and gooey. I'll have to get more cocoa powder in case the urge to make brownies again suddenly happens.
  #48  
Old 03-23-2017, 04:09 PM
quiltguy quiltguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
I made "The Best Lemon Bars" last week. We have a lemon tree and I didn't want the lemons to go to waste. Unfortunately, they were actually the worst lemon bars. I probably needed to bake the shortbread longer in the first step so it would be more cookie-like. It was actually mush, and it absorbed all the lemon mixture so I had a big pan of lemon mush.

No one in the household would eat more than a bite, except for one of the goats, and I think he was just trying to be nice. I threw it away.
Far too little flour to make the filling thick enough. The recipe I use now was similar, wound up adding 3 Tbsp. cornstarch(which has the thickening power of 6 Tbsp. of flour)
The bars now slice very cleanly, not mushy or ooze-y. btw, there's no lemon zest in that recipe, grate the rind of 2 lemons and add to the liquid ingredients(it's the zest rather than the liquid that'll give you that nice tart flavor these bars are supposed to have)
Bake the crust to a light golden color at the edges, and pour on the filling while the crust is still hot( I don't even take the pan out of the oven) Also, try baking the bars a bit longer.
  #49  
Old 03-23-2017, 04:22 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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I ordered the makings for madeleines this past week, included a madeleine pan, some caramel sugar and lemon sugar for rolling them. I'll let you know how they come out.
  #50  
Old 03-24-2017, 06:46 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
I made "The Best Lemon Bars" last week. We have a lemon tree and I didn't want the lemons to go to waste. Unfortunately, they were actually the worst lemon bars. I probably needed to bake the shortbread longer in the first step so it would be more cookie-like. It was actually mush, and it absorbed all the lemon mixture so I had a big pan of lemon mush.

No one in the household would eat more than a bite, except for one of the goats, and I think he was just trying to be nice. I threw it away.
Ever use your lemons to make limoncello?

Zest all your lemons. Add zest to everclear.
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