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  #51  
Old 03-24-2017, 09:50 PM
purplehorseshoe purplehorseshoe is offline
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Everclear? Jeeeeebus wouldn't vodka be enough?

I made King Ranch Chicken casserole the other week having never so much as tasted or laid eyes on it before. Apparently I was successful since I was immediately requested to add it to the regular rotation.
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  #52  
Old 03-25-2017, 07:00 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Everclear? Jeeeeebus wouldn't vodka be enough?
OK, mom.

Yeah, some people make it with vodka. Using grain alcohol adds a layer of epic though, since you have to drive out of PA to buy it.

When you sip it you'd never guess it was everclear.
  #53  
Old 04-02-2017, 08:35 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Coconut Rockfish with Mango Salsa

There was a big piece of rockfish in the freezer, so I decided to look for recipes. I found the one linked above, and I remembered we had about half a bag of shredded coconut in the cupboard. We also had a jar of Trader Joe's Island Salsa. (I used that instead of making it from the recipe.) There was one little problem, though. The fish recipe calls for unsweetened shredded coconut, and the stuff in the cupboard was sweetened. But the salsa's sweet, so I'll just roll with it. Per the recipe, I pan-fried the fish in olive oil and butter. The coating was getting dark, but the fish was still not cooked. I put the fish on a rack over the frying pan, and put it in a 350ºF oven for a bit.

The result was tasty. The coconut was not too sweet. (Or the salsa was so sweet, it masked the coconut's sweetness.) I thought the rockfish was a bit on the 'fishy' side. Now, I like a little fishiness in my fish. But it was just a mite too strong to be 'perfect'. I think this recipe would be good with mahi mahi. Mrs. L.A. liked it, Tonka liked it, and I liked it. Creamsicle missed out. It might go into the rotation -- but with a different fish.

For the side, we had black beans with some shredded cheddar on top.
  #54  
Old 04-03-2017, 10:06 AM
ryan ryan is offline
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I just cooked for the quarterly event held be our medieval reenactment group. It was the first since I'd become a full member so I'd volunteered to cook the main portions of the meal. I was cooking for 30-50 people but without a firm count or set menu preference, so I had to allow for some wiggle room. It was a potluck for sides and deserts, so I was off the hook as far as that went but I was still likely to try to throw something together if I could...


I decided on a beef bourguignon served over mashed potatoes (choice of raw garlic and parm/asiago, sauteed garlic/parm, and plain) or Gołąbki a.k.a. cabbage rolls stuffed with beef, barley and rice normally baked in a tomato sauce but considering our time period focus I decided on a modified version baked in a beef broth (I did make a half tray with tomato sauce for the few vegetarians/vegans in our group. I could have done it in a veggie stock but I was running out of time and energy at this point, having only slept 2 hrs the night before)Lots of leftover cabbage

I'd also made a couple batches of russian garlic salad, to marinate in the fridge for a week and I wanted to do a cut veggie platter with the celery and carrots I Didn't use, but again, time

The enntire meal won rave reviews from everyone who
  #55  
Old 04-03-2017, 12:40 PM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
Ever use your lemons to make limoncello?

Zest all your lemons. Add zest to everclear.
To up the lemon bite, juice the lemons after and make your simple syrup with the juice. Pour into the zest/everclear mixture after a few weeks.

It'll have some pectin floating in it, but that adds a great mouth-feel.
  #56  
Old 04-03-2017, 04:29 PM
Chisquirrel Chisquirrel is online now
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
OK, mom.

Yeah, some people make it with vodka. Using grain alcohol adds a layer of epic though, since you have to drive out of PA to buy it.

When you sip it you'd never guess it was everclear.
This sounds like me versus my cousins. I make apple pie with vodka. Theirs is still flammable.
  #57  
Old 04-03-2017, 06:36 PM
ryan ryan is offline
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Sorry my PC ate my post, I honestly thought the whole thing was trashed and I was falling asleep at my keyboard...

Continuing

Rave reviews from everyone who was there. The stew was demolished, with less than 2 quarts of the roughly 6 gallons I made making it into the fridge.

People didn't quite get the idea of the potatoes as a base for the stew which I caught as I was in the last stages of cooking and that's why I decided on the three varieties in case people decided to eat them as a side dish. As they mostly did.

The Cabbage rolls were popular but over shadowed, 1 1/4 of 3 tray of beef getting eaten, 3/4 taken home in "doggie" bags, and the last full tray being claimed by the hosts 17yr old son who fell in love with them!

The vegetarian ones were very good and appreciated. The only Vegan members were no-shows for the event so I didn't get their opinion but all the leftovers were taken home, so I'll take it as a compliment.

The Garlic Salad was good, if a little overpowering. The issue was the size of the garlic cloves, which were freaking huge! So even marinated for a week they still had more of a bite than I'd have liked. But now I know better and people did like the smaller bites/first couple bites. I did 2 kinds 1 in white wine vinaigrette and 1 in balsamic. I was a major pain in the ass to peel that much (more than a quart of raw garlic) but my "shopper" didn't have a chance to grab bulk jars of whole peeled garlic(when you can find them) but I will be making it again. Probably blanching it a minute or two longer if they're that large again.

I had a few bits and scraps left over so I did a quick saute of shredded cabbage, garlic and onions as a side. I did a half-assed risotto-like dish of rice, barley and beef in a creamy parm sauce using leftover dumpling filling. I wanted to chop my unused celery and carrots but someone had brought a veggie platter so they weren't needed. I completely forgot to dice chives to garnish the potatoes, so they're still up in the fridge.

I wanted to do some fresh bread but time and space limits as well as the official helper for the meal living 2 hrs away and not showing up until 2 hrs before the meal was to start.(Personal issues, not just poor timing) Thankfully a couple of the other citizens dove right in to help me, otherwise everything but the stew would've been late to the table.


I slept 5 hrs between Friday and Sunday but I pulled it off without a major hitch and everyone went home with a happy belly.

Which is all the thanks a cook needs.
  #58  
Old 05-20-2017, 10:12 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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OK, it's not actually cookery. But tonight I made my first daiquiris and a mojito. (I've had them before, but this is the first time I've made them.) After 9 ounces of rum, dinner was half a Tombstone pepperoni pizza.
  #59  
Old 05-21-2017, 01:53 PM
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Made an omlette this morning, never tried to do that before. Had parmesan cheese in it. Was quite edible.
  #60  
Old 05-21-2017, 06:56 PM
dwyr dwyr is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
I ordered the makings for madeleines this past week, included a madeleine pan, some caramel sugar and lemon sugar for rolling them. I'll let you know how they come out.

I love madeleines! After buying the expensive ones at the store for ages I finally made my own recently too. I found the classic shell pans and also one that looks like scallop shells. Used a great recipe from King Arthur Flour. They came out perfectly with the hump and all. I was going to dip one end in chocolate but they were so tasty I ate them all plain. Terrific with tea.

My next day off I'm going to try gnocchi for the first time.
  #61  
Old 05-21-2017, 07:20 PM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is online now
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We may have to move and significantly downsize our possessions (hardly a tragedy, we have way too much stuff) in a year or so, so I have already started looking critically at items in the house, assessing if they should be sold or given away when the time comes.

One such item was a spritz cookie press. I could see from the writing on the box that I must have bought it in Egypt, however I had never once used it. (We left Egypt in 2007).

So, I made spritz cookies for the first time ever, in order to determine whether the press would stay or go when we pack up again. Verdict? WE KEEP IT, NOM NOM NOM. The cookies were not only charming to look at, but exquisitely delicious. And so easy to make! (I used this recipe: http://www.wilton.com/classic-spritz...LRECIP-25.html)
  #62  
Old 05-21-2017, 08:15 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Everclear? Jeeeeebus wouldn't vodka be enough?
Well, the way we do it is take grain alcohol (192 proof, if we can get it; otherwise 151. 192 is not available in Chicago proper, but you can find it in some suburbs.), and then cut it with basically a simple syrup/water solution after steeping it for a few weeks to get it down to about 60 or so proof. We've done it with vodka and it's just not the same. Much better results with grain alcohol in terms of extracting the lemon flavor from the zest.

Pretty much all the infusions we and my parents (and they do a lot--it's a Polish custom to have all sorts of homemade shit around) start with grain alcohol (Spiritus, either 151 or 192--whatever you can get your hands on).

We've also done the version where you add the lemon juice, but we're more fans of just using lemon zest.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-21-2017 at 08:20 PM.
  #63  
Old 05-22-2017, 08:50 AM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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A neighbor gave us some beets from his garden. I'm going to try roasting them sometime this week.
  #64  
Old 05-22-2017, 09:52 AM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
A neighbor gave us some beets from his garden. I'm going to try roasting them sometime this week.
Mmmmmm, trim them, chop them, toss them in some balsamic vinegar and a bit of oil, then roast away!!!!

I especially like to roast beets along with other root vegies (potatoes, carrots, turnips, rutabagas, parsnips).
  #65  
Old 05-22-2017, 11:49 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I usually use a thick bottled teriyaki sauce or at most cobble up a little soy sauce and sugar glaze, but last night I used a Japanese grandma's teriyaki sauce I found on the internet and it was sublime.

1 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup each white sugar and brown sugar
1/2 cup each sake and mirin
Couple of chopped garlic cloves
A bit of fresh chopped ginger
Half a sliced onion
Tablespoonful of whole-grain mustard

Mix it all up and marinate, say, a tri-tip in it for a few hours. Fish it out, dry it off, and grill it, remembering that there's a lot of sugar in the sauce and it can scorch easily. Meanwhile, reserve the marinade and simmer it awhile to cook the onion and garlic. Fish out all the bits of onion, etc., and thicken it with a little cornstarch slurry until it's as thick as you prefer. Slice up your meat and drizzle it with the delectable thick teriyaki sauce and serve it with Japanese rice.

I'm sure chicken thighs, salmon, pork tenderloin, or just about anything would do just as well with this treatment.
  #66  
Old 05-22-2017, 01:18 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
Mmmmmm, trim them, chop them, toss them in some balsamic vinegar and a bit of oil, then roast away!!!!

I especially like to roast beets along with other root vegies (potatoes, carrots, turnips, rutabagas, parsnips).
How long do you think it'll take, like an hour?
  #67  
Old 05-22-2017, 02:11 PM
kayaker kayaker is offline
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How long do you think it'll take, like an hour?
We have a new oven that has a "convection roast" setting that uses a fan of some sort. With our old (normal) oven, I'd plan on 45 minutes and start poke-checking things in 30 minutes.
  #68  
Old 05-24-2017, 02:26 PM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Had a package of medium shrimp to use up last night. Threw some butter and olive oil in a pan and heated. Added some fennel seed and pepper flakes and let them cook for a minute. Put on some water and added a half pound of linguini to cook. Turned the heat up high, then tossed all the shrimp in and cooked for about 1-2 minutes on a side, just until they turn C-shaped. Removed them from the pan. Added another knob of butter. When it melted, I dumped in a few glugs of vermouth, and cooked it for a few minutes until the alcohol was boiled off and it reduced just a bit. Drained the pasta and tossed with the butter/vermouth sauce. Put in bowls and topped with the shrimp. Very good.
  #69  
Old 05-24-2017, 02:54 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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The beets turned out good, kayaker, thanks for the tips!
  #70  
Old 05-24-2017, 02:56 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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We made grilled eggplant with Thai chili sauce. I have no idea if anyone has tried it before, but it came out great. We added some oyster sauce to the mix to cut the sweetness, but the result was delicious, even though the sauce burned a bit (too much sugar).
  #71  
Old 05-24-2017, 03:38 PM
BobArrgh BobArrgh is offline
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Originally Posted by dwyr View Post
My next day off I'm going to try gnocchi for the first time.
Arrgh! I tried making gnocchi for the first time this past weekend. The #1 lesson learned was, "If you are making something new for dinner, always make sure you have a backup plan." In my case, the backup plan (which I did not have beforehand, BTW) was, "Run to the store for spaghetti to throw in the boiling water!"

A few months ago, my wife was diagnosed as being allergic to eggs, grasses (including wheat), and mold (including mushrooms). Also, we recently moved to an apartment closer to my work, and I get home at least 30 minutes before she does, so I have taken on the majority of the cooking. I told her that when after we moved, I would work on getting good, tasty recipes that would be OK for her to eat. For the most part, things have been good.

And then, an Italian woman at work held a mini-class on making gnocchi. I wasn't able to attend the class, but she told me about the process, and I saw her demonstrate (without actually having the potatoes or flour) using her ricer and a fork. It sounded like it would be a welcome change from our standard meals, so I thought I would try it.

So, here is what I ran into. (And, yes, I realize I had bitten off more than I could chew. Actually, there was no chewing involved, at least of gnocchi!)

1. I don't have a potato ricer, and tried to find one at various stores (Wal-mart, Target, Bed-Bath-and-Beyond, Container Store, and Function Junction). All the ricers they had are really big. In fact, I don't think they would fit in the tiny drawers in our apartment's kitchen, so I kept looking. I know they make smaller ricers, because I saw my coworker's ricer, and it was at least 25-30% smaller than the ricers I found in stores. (Turns out, she got hers in Italy.)

2. Decided to rice the gnocchi using a cheese grater. Was not the best experience. I sincerely hope I was able to remove the tiny piece of my knuckle that went through the cheese grater.

3. The recipe I was following said to let the potatoes cool for 20 minutes before trying to peel them. My wife said that it would be OK to peel them before boiling, so I did. My Italian friend told me that you have to boil the potatoes with the skin on, and then peel them immediately after the boil. She said, "If you don't burn your fingers, you aren't doing it right!" Hmmmmm.

4. Finally got the potatoes riced/grated/mashed, and went to look at the flour requirements. That was when I noticed that the online recipe I was modifying did not specify an amount for the flour. It just said, "Add flour little by little ...". So, I had a big ball of potatoes and I used a little bit of flour. I used about 3-4 tablespoons of flour (more on this later), which, according to my friend, was way too little.

5. I was using rice flour instead of wheat flour. I really have no idea how well rice flour can be substituted for wheat.

6. I had absolutely no idea what type of consistency of potato/flour I was looking for. It turns out, my mixture was way too dry.

7. I finally get the potato/flour morass to something I might be able to work with and cut and form a bunch of gnocchi. They don't look anything like what I have seen in pictures.

8. I drop one into the boiling water and wait for it to pop up to the top. I wait about a minute, but can't see it. I gently reach in with my slotted spoon and try to pick it up, but can't find it. Eventually, the steam clears and my glasses unfog enough for me to see that the dough has completely disintegrated.

So, I reached into the cupboard for spaghetti, only to find that we don't have any.

Arrgh, indeed!

On the other hand, my bolognese sauce came out very, very good. That was a highlight, and, over spaghetti, was very tasty.

I talked with my friend today and she explained where I went wrong. (And she is really gracious, too, and didn't start out with, "First, be born in Italy!") I'm going to try again soon, but this time, I'm only going to do one potato and do it as practice, and not for a meal.
  #72  
Old 05-24-2017, 05:51 PM
dwyr dwyr is offline
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I used this gnocchi recipe and it turned out fairly well. It calls for ricotta instead of potato so easier to work with. They turned out a little on the heavy side but nice.
  #73  
Old 05-26-2017, 09:49 AM
aruvqan aruvqan is offline
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First thing I ever learned to cook was a classic egg custard [well it was my favorite dessert!] My mom was a stay at home mom, so she made pretty much everything from scratch, she grew up a farm girl from South central Iowa, during the depression so fancy store bought foods tended not to be had. Great cook though. I learned by helping in the kitchen from the time I was 8 - I could make bread, chocolate or yellow cake from scratch, cooked fudge frosting, buttercream frosting, a favorite gift to make was little buttercream mints [dead easy, confectioners sugar with enough softened room temperature unsalted butter to make a thick paste and a dribble of mint extract and plain or a drop or two of food coloring. Roll into a half inch thick rope, and cut into little cylinders of about half an inch long, set on waxed paper in the fridge to 'set up' and pack in a tin full of powdered sugar. You do have to keep them coolish, and eat them in a week or so but they made a great thing for around the winter holidays]

I did my first Thanksgiving classic meal solo when I was 12, Mom was ill with pneumonia so I had to step up. I did a souffle [chocolate] the first time when I was 8 or so, with Mom coaching me all the way, and I soloed my first cheese souffle a few months later.

Last few years I have been using FoodGawker to get recipes and ideas to change up our menu planning - the one thing I disliked about the past in the US was the rut people fell into of always having the same stuff week after week [you know, Wednesday being Prince Spaghetti day, or a roast chicken or roast beef for Sunday dinner, and the like.] I think we have a couple hundred recipes that we now rotate through, and whenever we find one that looks interesting we always give it a try before we do it if there are guests coming over. This past Thanksgiving we did the Jas Townsend youtube 1700s Thanksgiving, with a couple added dishes in case people wanted some more modern classics. We did most of the recipes before just to make sure they would come out and I have to say while the cranberry pie was excellent, I think the consensus was we all preferred the goop as cranberry sauce instead of in pie [though the butternut squash pie rivaled the regular pumpkin pie, and the ragout of green beans absolutely kicked ass over the homemade bechamel and home fried crispy onion green bean casserole.]
  #74  
Old 05-26-2017, 10:04 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
I did my first Thanksgiving classic meal solo when I was 12, Mom was ill with pneumonia so I had to step up.
My first was when I was 10, when my mom was horribly sick with flu or something.
  #75  
Old 05-29-2017, 08:43 AM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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I mentioned in the "What's For Dinner" thread that I made my first tiramisu yesterday.

It was a lot easier than I anticipated. There's no cooking involved, and it all came together rather quickly.

A quick sum-up: separate eggs, beat the yolks with sugar until they're white and creamy, add mascarpone cheese and vanilla. Beat whites separately, then combine the two egg mixtures. Roll some of those Italian lady finger cookies around in espresso and rum, and make two layers each of the cookies and the cheese mixture, starting with the cookies and ending with the cheese. Sift bitter cocoa powder over the top.

Goldern, that was good. It was better than good: it was the best one I ever ate, as it was light and ethereal, yet still full-flavored. 2/3 of it is still the fridge and will be eaten over the next couple of days.
  #76  
Old 05-29-2017, 10:07 AM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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The first (and currently, the only) time I made tiramisu, I liked it a lot. Much better than the ones at the supermarket bakery where they use cake. Honestly, I used too much espresso. But I like coffee, so it was good.

Last night I made the seared ahi tacos with wasabi cream and mango-avocado salsa I wrote about in this thread.

I also made jalapeño poppers from scratch for the first time. Mrs. L.A. was watching me, and I lost my attention for a split second, long enough for me to pass my hand through the blowtorch. The peppers turned out well; spicier than what you get at a convenience store's hot case, or the frozen-food section of the supermarket.

And I made a s'more for the first time. That was the second s'more I'd had in my life. My first s'more was the one my wife made just before the one I made.
  #77  
Old 05-29-2017, 10:40 AM
stillownedbysetters stillownedbysetters is offline
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I did pulled pork BBQ from scratch for the first time yesterday. It was so easy and came out so tasty that I am kicking myself that I didn't try it sooner.
  #78  
Old 05-29-2017, 03:25 PM
turner turner is offline
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RE Gnocci:

I love good Gnocci (ironically the best I've had was in Germany). So I tried to make them. I learned several things:

1) Bake your potatoes. I know every recipe says boil, but baking them prevents too much moisture which in turn requires more flour which makes them gluey.

2) Work them while they are hot. DO NOT COOL

3) For two pounds of potato, you need one egg (holds them together) and no more than 1 cup of flour. Dough should be moist, but not wet.

4) Do not have your water at a hard boil, but not a simmer either. when the water just starts to boil, throw the whole batch into the pot and turn off the heat. LEave tehm in the pot for about 2-3 minutes after they float

This produces clouds of potatoey goodness that melt in your mouth, not in your pot.
  #79  
Old 05-29-2017, 03:34 PM
turner turner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teela brown View Post
I mentioned in the "What's For Dinner" thread that I made my first tiramisu yesterday.

It was a lot easier than I anticipated. There's no cooking involved, and it all came together rather quickly.

A quick sum-up: separate eggs, beat the yolks with sugar until they're white and creamy, add mascarpone cheese and vanilla. Beat whites separately, then combine the two egg mixtures. Roll some of those Italian lady finger cookies around in espresso and rum, and make two layers each of the cookies and the cheese mixture, starting with the cookies and ending with the cheese. Sift bitter cocoa powder over the top.

Goldern, that was good. It was better than good: it was the best one I ever ate, as it was light and ethereal, yet still full-flavored. 2/3 of it is still the fridge and will be eaten over the next couple of days.
I make essentially the same recipe but I add rum to the coffee. I always get raves on this and people ask me for the recipe and I refuse to give it--not because its an old family recipe, but these days, people FREAK when they know you used raw egg in something.
  #80  
Old 05-29-2017, 03:44 PM
turner turner is offline
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NM

Last edited by turner; 05-29-2017 at 03:45 PM. Reason: repost
  #81  
Old 05-29-2017, 03:56 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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Originally Posted by turner View Post
I make essentially the same recipe but I add rum to the coffee. I always get raves on this and people ask me for the recipe and I refuse to give it--not because its an old family recipe, but these days, people FREAK when they know you used raw egg in something.
I saw that some recipes recommended you beat the yolks and sugar in a double boiler, cooking the yolks, but most recipes didn't have this step. Well, neither of us are showing symptoms of salmonella, so I'm not worried.

ETA: I used decaf espresso, so that we won't be up all night just because we had some tiramisu for dessert.

Last edited by teela brown; 05-29-2017 at 03:59 PM.
  #82  
Old 05-29-2017, 09:07 PM
Johnny L.A. Johnny L.A. is offline
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Galumpkis.
  #83  
Old 05-30-2017, 07:33 AM
amijoe amijoe is offline
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I cured my own bacon. Everything I had read online said home-cure bacon's so much better/juicier/tastier than store-bought. Mine wasn't.

The process was simple, lengthy but little effort involved. Rub the cure onto your belly pork, seal in a container (I used a ziplock bag), chill 24hrs then rinse, repeat over 5 days. A final rinse then hang for a week. My cure had classic pancetta flavors including garlic and rosemary, black pepper, and I used molasses sugar and celery leaf as extra aromatics.

It's turned out extremely salty and the garlic overwhelms everything else. Extra rinsing does nothing to help, I need to poach it in plain water before it's edible, and I don't feel that the texture is a great deal different than if I had bought it. I love experimenting with kitchen diy and pretending like I'm a homesteader, but this was an exercise in disappointment. I could learn from my mistakes and do better next time but . . . nope. Store-bought from now on.

I do have a freezer drawer full of garlicky lardons, though. They're pretty good on pizza.
  #84  
Old 05-30-2017, 08:29 AM
TruCelt TruCelt is offline
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Originally Posted by BobArrgh View Post
Arrgh! I tried making gnocchi for the first time this past weekend.
. . .

A few months ago, my wife was diagnosed as being allergic to eggs, grasses (including wheat), and mold (including mushrooms).

. . .
I've been wracking my brain trying to work through the substitutions on this, and I can't think of a way it can be done. The two things that hold pasta and dumplings together when they hit the water are eggs and gluten. If you can't use eggs, you can need the dough a bit to get the gluten really stringy, and that will do it (but your pasta won't be as tender.)

Without either of those ingredients? Maybe a high gluten rice flour? And then let it sit for a bit to incorporate the liquid really well, and knead.

If you pull the dough apart it should stretch a little. If it doesn't, then maybe just settle for pan fried gnocchi?
  #85  
Old 05-31-2017, 04:53 AM
jerez jerez is offline
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I like mussels and this recipe just kind of came to me the other day. It was very good, although I’m sure it can be tweaked/improved.


Clean mussels of all filaments and incrustation. Discard any open mussels that won’t close when you tap on the shell. Put an inch or less of water in a big pot for steaming, add washed bay leaf, not too much salt, the steaming basket and the mussels. Steam for a few minutes. Separate mussel meat from shells, discarding any mussels that haven’t opened and removing any remaining filaments. Filter liquid and set aside. Sauté chopped leek, add flour and let cook for a minute or two, add liquid from steaming mussels and a bit of milk and stir until the sauce thickens. Serve over spinach noodles.
  #86  
Old 06-07-2017, 06:20 PM
gkster gkster is offline
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Homemade baba ganoush, delicious and fairly easy but labor intensive what with roasting, deseeding and pulping. I used Sicilian eggplants, which have loads of seeds and at first it took me forever to remove them--I didn't mind some seeds but there was almost 1/3 cup of seeds from 3 eggplants. It wasn't until halfway through that I figured out that the seeds were almost all attached to pods inside and I could just pull out the entire pods.
  #87  
Old 06-07-2017, 06:55 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Almost Silicon Valley
Posts: 8,826
I posted elsewhere that I made Thai shrimp salad this weekend. I found a recipe on a real Thai cooking channel on youtube, and used that. I couldn't get kaffir lime leaves or Thai chilis (I used habanero instead), but otherwise I had all the ingredients.

Boy, was that good. It was tart and fiery and sweet and floral all at once. Good thing I made some jasmine rice to go with it, because all that intense flavor needed something bland as an offset.
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