Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:06 AM
bomberswarm2 bomberswarm2 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 153
How come serial killers in USA kill so many people

In Australia, the worst serial killers are John Bunting and Ivan Milat. Bunting killed 12 people and Milat at least 7, but both of them have exceptional circumstances as to why they were able to kill so many (Milat killed backpackers before mobile phones, Bunting killed unemployed people that in general nobody really cares about, = no reporting). But in the US, there's hundreds of serial killers (not mass murderers) with body counts of 20+. How come the U.S authorities are so much worse at stopping and finding these serial killers than Australian police?
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:12 AM
Enola Gay Enola Gay is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: California
Posts: 1,858
The most prolific US serial killer was Gary Ridgeway and he killed prostitutes, which society tends not to care about. Ted Bundy targeted college coeds but his good looks & charisma fooled a lot of people for a long time.
  #3  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:18 AM
Me_Billy Me_Billy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,420
It could be the other way around... Maybe the U.S. is better at discovering ALL of the murders serial killers commit? And maybe other countries only discover some of those murders?

Or... Also in the U.S., police are said to "clean their desktops" when a nasty crook comes along. Blame everything on that one crook. They like to close all those open cases. Maybe that is happening?
  #4  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:29 AM
pool pool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Inside
Posts: 3,650
I think a lot of South American serial killers would give North America a run for its money. Specifically three Columbian serial killers: Pedro Lopex killed between an estimated 110-300+

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_...serial_killer)

And Luis Garavito killed a confirmed 138 and possibly 300 or more.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_Garavito#Murders

Daniel Camargo Barbosa also raped and killed up to 150 girls:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Camargo_Barbosa

Last edited by pool; 05-19-2016 at 10:30 AM.
  #5  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:33 AM
Folly Folly is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago! (no more burbs)
Posts: 1,877
Where are you getting hundreds of serial killers in the US with 20+ body counts? On this Wikipedia list, I count 10.
Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/list_o...ber_of_victims
  #6  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:45 AM
Omar Little Omar Little is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Within
Posts: 11,673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Where are you getting hundreds of serial killers in the US with 20+ body counts? On this Wikipedia list, I count 10.
Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/list_o...ber_of_victims
It just sounds better to use hyperbole like, "hundreds".
  #7  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:54 AM
running coach running coach is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 31,374
How come serial killers in USA kill so many people

They wouldn't be much of a serial killer if they only knocked off one or two, now would they?

  #8  
Old 05-19-2016, 10:58 AM
Chihuahua Chihuahua is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,389
Yeah.... I'm going to need a cite for those numbers. I count only ten serial killers with (known) body counts over 20.

Gary Ridgway
Ted Bundy
John Wayne Gacy
Dean Coril
Juan Vallejo Corona
Wayne Williams
Ronald Dominique
Earle Nelson
Patrick Kearney
William Bonin

Further, selection bias also plays a huge role here. How many Australian killers escaped notice and are still at large? How many potential serial killers were caught on their first attempt? How many people did they actually kill, compared to the ones that were proven? What are the populations of the areas the various killings took places? Any attempt to measure the effectiveness of law enforcement has to take all of these things into account.
  #9  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:01 AM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 36,859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Where are you getting hundreds of serial killers in the US with 20+ body counts? On this Wikipedia list, I count 10.
Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/list_o...ber_of_victims
First of all, the premise of the OP is wildly wrong. There are far fewer known serial killers with high body counts in the US than he alleges.

However, some of the known killers have higher counts than those in Australia. This might be expected just because the US has 13 times the population of Australia, and so would have a greater absolute number of killers with access to a greater number of victims.

The killers with really large numbers of victims have been in Third World countries where the police are often corrupt or incompetent, and likely to devote little attention to the disappearance of poor children or women.
  #10  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:06 AM
yojimbo yojimbo is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 9,397
Harold Shipman is arguably the most prolific ever and not American.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Shipman
Quote:
On 31 January 2000, a jury found Shipman guilty of 15 murders, but an inquiry after his conviction confirmed he was responsible for at least 218. He was sentenced to life imprisonment and the judge recommended that he never be released.
  #11  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:11 AM
Folly Folly is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago! (no more burbs)
Posts: 1,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omar Little View Post
It just sounds better to use hyperbole like, "hundreds".
Yeah, but when the difference is only 10, it's easier to dismiss for reasons like the US has more than 10 times the population of Australia.
  #12  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:15 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 26,591
How come serial killers in USA kill so many people

Serial killer pride?
  #13  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:30 AM
Enola Gay Enola Gay is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: California
Posts: 1,858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Where are you getting hundreds of serial killers in the US with 20+ body counts? On this Wikipedia list, I count 10.
Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/list_o...ber_of_victims
I'm a little ashamed that our US Serial killers are such underachievers. South America, China and India are all outperforming us
  #14  
Old 05-19-2016, 12:46 PM
Jackknifed Juggernaut Jackknifed Juggernaut is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Lenni Lenape Land
Posts: 5,326
We don't have dingoes to blame it on.
  #15  
Old 05-19-2016, 12:51 PM
boffking boffking is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: New England
Posts: 2,388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Where are you getting hundreds of serial killers in the US with 20+ body counts? On this Wikipedia list, I count 10.
Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/list_o...ber_of_victims
If you include the medical professionals who murdered on the job, which are listed on that page, then I count 13. 14, if you want to count Steven Massof, but I don't want to derail this thread with an abortion debate.
  #16  
Old 05-19-2016, 01:09 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 39,268
Quote:
Originally Posted by pool View Post
Specifically three Columbian serial killers . . .
Yeah, but do you really want to dig up 500-year-old cases?
  #17  
Old 05-19-2016, 01:27 PM
Omar Little Omar Little is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Within
Posts: 11,673
Maybe it's because our serial killers are smarter than Aussie serial killers.
  #18  
Old 05-19-2016, 01:57 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,068
Ignoring older, sadistic killers who simply racked up the numbers due to police incompetence or apathy...

One analysis I read said that the problem producing modern serial killers is a lack of social conditioning. Typical human social development consists of social interaction with extended family and the community, mixing generations and age groups. Plus, in poorer societies, children have a role and responsibilities from an early age - i.e. older sisters end up being babysitters and surrogate mothers in a large family. The suggestion was that in the last half-century or more, this socialization has disappeared. The typical serial killer who finally cracks and goes to shoot up or blow up a school or theatre, or keeps to himself and finds victims to murder one by one - these are the type of people who are permitted by social circumstances to sit in a basement rec room, not interact with their peers or family, solitary or with another like-minded individual and stew in their own thoughts without "adult supervision". As one comment said, "adolescence is a lesson in being human, and some people don't get it."

It also tends to explain why the majority such problem offenders seems to be from small families of relatively good income. Someone in a ghetto or poor neighborhood does not have the luxury of solitary space, nor do they have the luxury of having any needs provided for without work.

As to why the higher body counts - "The USA is 15 times the size of Australia". It's also more fragmented, the States model is more like 50 independent countries. I would point out that someone like Bundy went cross country and it took a while before someone noticed that killings in different locales fit a given pattern, Perhaps the "low-count" serial killers stuck to one area, making their pattern more obvious as it was the same law enforcement encountering the evidence?

And again, for a long time targeting prostitutes and the margins of society (loners, migrants, runaways, those with less connections to mainstream society) meant it was less noticed and the police paid less interest to the problem. The Robert Pickton murders (50+ women, mainly prostitutes and junkies from the seedier area of Vancouver, BC - it was a scandal when it broke that the police basically ignored a great deal of evidence since it seemed they couldn't be bothered to investigate. He simply made sure there were no bodies to trigger the investigation.

Last edited by md2000; 05-19-2016 at 01:57 PM.
  #19  
Old 05-19-2016, 02:19 PM
Crazyhorse Crazyhorse is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,035
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
One analysis I read said that the problem producing modern serial killers is a lack of social conditioning. Typical human social development consists of social interaction with extended family and the community, mixing generations and age groups. Plus, in poorer societies, children have a role and responsibilities from an early age - i.e. older sisters end up being babysitters and surrogate mothers in a large family. The suggestion was that in the last half-century or more, this socialization has disappeared. The typical serial killer who finally cracks and goes to shoot up or blow up a school or theatre, or keeps to himself and finds victims to murder one by one - these are the type of people who are permitted by social circumstances to sit in a basement rec room, not interact with their peers or family, solitary or with another like-minded individual and stew in their own thoughts without "adult supervision". As one comment said, "adolescence is a lesson in being human, and some people don't get it."
You didn't mention where you read that analysis, but it's considered to be incorrect by the FBI and the National Center For The Analysis Of Violent Crime.

Quote:
Myth: Serial killers are all dysfunctional loners.

The majority of serial killers are not reclusive, social misfits who live alone. They are not monsters and may not appear strange. Many serial killers hide in plain sight within their communities. Serial murderers often have families and homes, are gainfully employed, and appear to be normal members of the community. Because many serial murderers can blend in so effortlessly, they are oftentimes overlooked by law enforcement and the public.

• Robert Yates killed seventeen prostitutes in the Spokane, Washington area, during the 1990s. He was married with five children, lived in a middle class neighborhood, and was a decorated U.S. Army National Guard helicopter pilot. During the time period of the murders, Yates routinely patronized prostitutes, and several of his victims knew each other. Yates buried one of his victims in his yard, beneath his bedroom window. Yates was eventually arrested and pled guilty to thirteen of the murders.

• The Green River Killer, Gary Ridgeway, confessed to killing 48 women over a twenty-year time period in the Seattle, Washington area. He had been married three times and was still married at the time of his arrest. He was employed as a truck painter for thirty-two years. He attended church regularly, read the Bible at home and at work, and talked about religion with co-workers. Ridgeway also frequently picked up prostitutes and had sex with them throughout the time period in which he was killing.

• The BTK killer, Dennis Rader, killed ten victims in and around Wichita, Kansas. He sent sixteen written communications to the news media over a thirty-year period, taunting the police and the public. He was married with two children, was a Boy Scout leader, served honorably in the U.S. Air Force, was employed as a local government official, and was president of his church.
  #20  
Old 05-19-2016, 02:59 PM
obbn obbn is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 2,343
USA! WE'RE NUMBER ONE, WE'RE NUMBER ONE, WE'RE NUM...... Oh, never mind
  #21  
Old 05-19-2016, 03:03 PM
md2000 md2000 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazyhorse View Post
You didn't mention where you read that analysis, but it's considered to be incorrect by the FBI and the National Center For The Analysis Of Violent Crime.
I got the impression it was more about the Columbine/Sandy Hook type of killer...

Of course, those have better body counts in the USA because firearms are easier to come by.
  #22  
Old 05-19-2016, 03:37 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Posts: 12,801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enola Gay View Post
I'm a little ashamed that our US Serial killers are such underachievers. South America, China and India are all outperforming us
In American culture, firearms are the default first-resort weapon of choice. But few, if any, serial killers are unimaginative enough to use guns, and probably have an aversion to them, preferring to savor the death of their victim, rather than quick hollow points. Guns are inconsistent with the panache of serial killing. Except in the USA, the sound of a gunshot attracts too much attention and thereby militates against the serial killer, whose most positive attribute is patience..

Last edited by jtur88; 05-19-2016 at 03:40 PM.
  #23  
Old 05-19-2016, 04:03 PM
pool pool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Inside
Posts: 3,650
Not sure why people are bringing up Columbine and Sandy Hook, those are categorized as spree killers, this thread is about serial killers, there is a difference. Obviously there is some overlap in personality traits and mental disorders, but they usually fulfill different types of motivations.
  #24  
Old 05-19-2016, 04:06 PM
Crazyhorse Crazyhorse is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,035
A mass murderer isn't necessarily a serial killer. But there are no specific, identifying features or commonalities among either one that anyone can look out for.

Tendency to violence in general is higher among those who had an abusive home life. Substance abuse is frequently a factor. But at the end of the day a lot of people come from abusive homes and abuse substances and still don't make the decision to murder anyone.

It's a complex set of experiences, environment, psychology, possibly biology, but finally, a decision to kill that is just that - a decision. And we don't know what leads to that decision.
  #25  
Old 05-19-2016, 06:49 PM
NeonMadman NeonMadman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 753
Quote:
Originally Posted by running coach View Post
They wouldn't be much of a serial killer if they only knocked off one or two, now would they?

That's what I was thinking; it's sort of in the job description.
  #26  
Old 05-19-2016, 07:13 PM
dropzone dropzone is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Cloud Cuckoo Land
Posts: 28,013
Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45 View Post
Yeah, but do you really want to dig up 500-year-old cases?
One reason I never became a forensic anthropologist is that I prefer my dead folk long dead. And dry. Maybe smelling a bit musty, but no Stiff Whiff. Five hundred years sounds about right.
  #27  
Old 05-19-2016, 07:20 PM
spamforbrains spamforbrains is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,416
According to this https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...-murder-differ
there's a big difference between spree/mass murders and serial killers. Serial killers usually appear perfectly normal between their kills, which seem to be motivated by sexual or other psychological urges, while mass murders are often psychologically troubled and are motivated by revenge and/or a psychotic break from reality.
  #28  
Old 05-19-2016, 11:30 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,561
Alexander Picushkin might rival Ridgway in body count and he's Russian.
  #29  
Old 05-20-2016, 12:44 AM
Seanette Seanette is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atamasama View Post
Alexander Picushkin might rival Ridgway in body count and he's Russian.
Andrei Chikatilo's got them both beat, at 53 he was convicted of, 3 others possible but not proven (even by Soviet "standards").
  #30  
Old 05-20-2016, 01:12 AM
Starving Artist Starving Artist is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 16,172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Yeah, but when the difference is only 10, it's easier to dismiss for reasons like the US has more than 10 times the population of Australia.
Excellent point. The greater Los Angeles area alone has almost as large a population as Australia, with a population of 18.68 million vs Australia's 23.13 million.

And given the overall U.S. population of 318 million, you could multiply each Australian serial killer by almost 14 to arrive at the number of serial killers Australia might have if it's population were as large as that of the U.S.
  #31  
Old 05-20-2016, 07:26 AM
astorian astorian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 33,979
Just because there's a new serial killer on Criminal Minds every week, it doesn't follow that the USA is filled with serial killers in real life.

I assure you, nobody here goes through life terrified of a serial killer around the corner. Such criminals just aren't very common.

Last edited by astorian; 05-20-2016 at 07:27 AM.
  #32  
Old 05-20-2016, 12:21 PM
furryman furryman is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Collinwood, Collinsport
Posts: 3,251
I don't know how true this is but:
French:
Giles de Rais "hundreds killed"

Hungarian:
Elizabeth Bathory "hundreds killed"

Cite: Wikipedia
  #33  
Old 05-20-2016, 12:56 PM
Seanette Seanette is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,443
Isn't Australia's population also more concentrated into the coastal areas, vs. how spread-out the US population is? Makes it a lot easier to keep killing without the crimes being linked if you can easily find prey in a variety of places, instead of having to be limited to a small area.
  #34  
Old 05-20-2016, 01:04 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 36,859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanette View Post
Isn't Australia's population also more concentrated into the coastal areas, vs. how spread-out the US population is? Makes it a lot easier to keep killing without the crimes being linked if you can easily find prey in a variety of places, instead of having to be limited to a small area.
Australia is almost the size of the lower 48 states, with less than one tenth the population, so it's much more sparsely inhabited.
  #35  
Old 05-20-2016, 01:41 PM
Seanette Seanette is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
Australia is almost the size of the lower 48 states, with less than one tenth the population, so it's much more sparsely inhabited.
But doesn't that population cluster around the coastal areas, with lots of uninhabited territory?
  #36  
Old 05-20-2016, 02:51 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
SD Curator of Critters
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Panama
Posts: 36,859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanette View Post
But doesn't that population cluster around the coastal areas, with lots of uninhabited territory?
True. That makes the interior even emptier. However, the two cases mentioned in the OP are not very far from the coasts.
  #37  
Old 05-20-2016, 06:35 PM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeonMadman View Post
That's what I was thinking; it's sort of in the job description.
I've killed at least a dozen boxes of Cocoa Puffs.


what?
  #38  
Old 05-20-2016, 11:54 PM
NeonMadman NeonMadman is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 753
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
I've killed at least a dozen boxes of Cocoa Puffs.


what?
I heard there was a cereal killer in my hometown; they found the mutilated bodies of Tony the Tiger and Captain Crunch in a dumpster behind the local movie theater.

  #39  
Old 05-21-2016, 02:43 AM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by astorian View Post
Just because there's a new serial killer on Criminal Minds every week, it doesn't follow that the USA is filled with serial killers in real life.

I assure you, nobody here goes through life terrified of a serial killer around the corner. Such criminals just aren't very common.
Up here in Washington State we seem to keep producing them (Ted Bundy, Gary Ridgway, even the Beltway Sniper). I grew up in a time when the Green River Killer was active, nobody knew who he was, and he was something of a bogeyman. It's unreal to me now to have him caught and behind bars, I still remember him as something almost mythical and terrifying.
  #40  
Old 05-21-2016, 08:23 AM
astorian astorian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 33,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeonMadman View Post
I heard there was a cereal killer in my hometown; they found the mutilated bodies of Tony the Tiger and Captain Crunch in a dumpster behind the local movie theater.

It was the rabbit. All those years of kids tormenting him and denying him Trix sent him over the edge.

Last edited by astorian; 05-21-2016 at 08:23 AM.
  #41  
Old 05-21-2016, 08:30 AM
running coach running coach is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Riding my handcycle
Posts: 31,374
Quote:
Originally Posted by gigi View Post
I've killed at least a dozen boxes of Cocoa Puffs.


what?
You were cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs
  #42  
Old 05-21-2016, 09:40 AM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Folly View Post
Where are you getting hundreds of serial killers in the US with 20+ body counts? On this Wikipedia list, I count 10.
Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/list_o...ber_of_victims
Maybe he's counting the ones on cop tv shows. There are LOTS of them there.
  #43  
Old 05-21-2016, 10:41 AM
astorian astorian is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: austin tx usa
Posts: 33,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
Maybe he's counting the ones on cop tv shows. There are LOTS of them there.
Yes, and they're always diabolical geniuses.
  #44  
Old 05-21-2016, 10:52 AM
Mdcastle Mdcastle is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chihuahua View Post
Yeah.... I'm going to need a cite for those numbers. I count only ten serial killers with (known) body counts over 20.

Gary Ridgway
Ted Bundy
John Wayne Gacy
Dean Coril
Juan Vallejo Corona
Wayne Williams
Ronald Dominique
Earle Nelson
Patrick Kearney
William Bonin

Further, selection bias also plays a huge role here. How many Australian killers escaped notice and are still at large? How many potential serial killers were caught on their first attempt? How many people did they actually kill, compared to the ones that were proven? What are the populations of the areas the various killings took places? Any attempt to measure the effectiveness of law enforcement has to take all of these things into account.
Most of these had one or more of the following factors:
1) Targeted prostitutes, drifters, the poor, or such that are not readily missed and a big deal isn't made when they disappear. Gacy got caught when he departed from MO and smoked a middle class teen instead of the random person he picked up on the street or that worked with him for a few days.

2) Committed crimes over a wide variety of jurisdictions, like Bundy. The US is more decentralized and less coordinated than, say France.

Last edited by Mdcastle; 05-21-2016 at 10:53 AM.
  #45  
Old 05-21-2016, 11:26 AM
JRDelirious JRDelirious is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Displaced
Posts: 14,564
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
First of all, the premise of the OP is wildly wrong. There are far fewer known serial killers with high body counts in the US than he alleges.
I am at times amused by how every so often I see bandied about the notion that the USA is some sort of wild crimescape where the serial killer (popular incarnation: axe murderer*), child abductor, rapist, etc. roam freely in a continuous feeding frenzy. Crime in the US is highly sensationalized by media coverage, both news and entertainment, and by those seeking to make a political point that things are all going to Hell and taking you down for the ride unless you vote to [select one: crack down/correct injustices].



(*It became a cliché, in the conversation between two characters about meeting someone new there would be "how do you know he's not an axe murderer". Why was it especially important to avoid the axe murderer as opposed to the other possible killers always escaped me.)

Last edited by JRDelirious; 05-21-2016 at 11:27 AM.
  #46  
Old 05-22-2016, 02:37 PM
gigi gigi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Flatlander in NH
Posts: 24,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by running coach View Post
You were cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs
The Twinkie defense has nothing on me.
  #47  
Old 05-22-2016, 02:45 PM
kayT kayT is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Austin
Posts: 4,482
I guess the OP lost interest in this topic after posting it. That seems to happen a lot with this particular OP. I wonder if he comes back and reads the posts or what Hey, OP, are you reading ths? What do you think of the replies so far?
  #48  
Old 05-23-2016, 01:25 PM
Atamasama Atamasama is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,561
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRDelirious View Post
(*It became a cliché, in the conversation between two characters about meeting someone new there would be "how do you know he's not an axe murderer". Why was it especially important to avoid the axe murderer as opposed to the other possible killers always escaped me.)
It's probably the most gruesome portable weapon. Wounds with an axe are going to be deep and large due to the weight and large cutting area. Dismemberment will also be likely. A knife or gun or spear or baseball bat killing just doesn't have the visceral revulsion of an axe killing.

A chainsaw may be worse than an axe, but it's less practical as a weapon (nobody has gone to war using a chainsaw after all).
  #49  
Old 05-23-2016, 03:36 PM
Doyle Doyle is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 675
Yang Xinhai - Would enter victims' homes at night and kill everyone with axes, meat cleavers, hammers, and shovels. Executed in February 2004. Known as the "Monster Killer"

They really had to dig down deep to come up with that nickname.
  #50  
Old 05-24-2016, 03:20 PM
pool pool is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Inside
Posts: 3,650
I think before the advent of ubiquitous cell phones and the internet, along with increased use of surveillance cameras there was a period of time that was sort of the "golden age" of serial killers in America. Prob somewhere between the 70's-early 90's when it was easy to get around and pick off targets but you didn't have to worry much about being tracked by a cell phone or GPS and all that, not to mention DNA Analysis wasn't nearly as sophisticated. But now with all the mass surveillance and ways to track people, along with sophisticated forensic analysis with things like fiber and DNA, and even more its a lot harder to be a serial killer and get away with it for years the way people did back in the day, obviously a good thing.
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:21 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2017 Sun-Times Media, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017